Author Topic: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon  (Read 35126 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online ashwin#1

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 619
  • Gender: Male
  • The Best
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #260 on: May 18, 2011, 04:27:54 AM »
JUAN MARTIN DEL-POTRO WILL BE PLAYING AT THE FRENCH OPEN 2011 !!!! :lmao: :cool:

Del-potro tweeted his entry last night !! : "Con mucho esfuerzo, pero llegamos." NOS VEMOS EN PARIS!!!! Saludos a todos y gracias por sus mensajes!!
( English translation : " With a lot of effort, but we come. " SEE YOU LATER IN PARIS!!!! Greetings to all and thanks for his messages!! )
You can ignore reality, but you can't ignore the consequences of ignoring reality.

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #261 on: May 18, 2011, 10:55:52 AM »
JUAN MARTIN DEL-POTRO WILL BE PLAYING AT THE FRENCH OPEN 2011 !!!! :lmao: :cool:

Del-potro tweeted his entry last night !! : "Con mucho esfuerzo, pero llegamos." NOS VEMOS EN PARIS!!!! Saludos a todos y gracias por sus mensajes!!
( English translation : " With a lot of effort, but we come. " SEE YOU LATER IN PARIS!!!! Greetings to all and thanks for his messages!! )


Good news all around, now to take a few scalps.  :)>>>>


Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #262 on: May 21, 2011, 01:16:30 AM »
Juan Martin del Potro: 'To win, first you have to know how to lose'

The Brian Viner Interview: The 6ft 6in Argentine has been brought low by injury since his 2009 US Open win, but is ready to compete with the best again
Friday, 20 May 2011



Only one man in the world has beaten both Rafa Nadal and Roger Federer in the same Grand Slam event, indeed on consecutive days, and despite the rise and rise of Novak Djokovic, so vertiginous that Nadal, winner of five out of the last six French Opens, starts this year's tournament as only the narrowest of favourites, it is not him.


No, it was the 6ft 6in Argentine Juan Martin del Potro, who put first Nadal and then Federer to the sword in the semi-final and final of the 2009 US Open. And as the rumbustious New York crowd saluted his singular achievement with whoops and cheers, it seemed as though the world was at Del Potro's feet, no matter that he has to look further down than most of us to see them. He had become the tallest man ever to win a Grand Slam title, and it seemed likely that there would be several if not many more. He was only 20 years old.

As he basked in the glory, however, he was not to know that he was less on the cusp of fabulous success than intense frustration. Damage to tendons in his right wrist wiped out most of his 2010 season, and his world ranking, once as high as four, duly plummeted. I meet a fellow desperate to reassert his formidable presence at the top table of men's tennis, which he signalled by winning the Estoril Open in Portugal recently. His English is not marvellous, but it is clear that he is a bright and thoughtful young man, for whom such a serious injury could hardly have come at a worse time.

"It is so difficult when you are out for a year, not just because you are not playing, but because other players are still playing," he says. "They are in competition all the time, so when you come in again and try to play them at the same level, with the same intensity, it is very hard." He was sustained, he adds, by a barrage of supportive texts from other top players, among them Federer, Nadal, Djokovic and Andy Murray. "That was a nice signal," he says. "It showed they were still thinking of me. That [kind of fraternity] is more important than the actual game. If the others care about you it means you are a good person. For me that's more important than playing good tennis."

This emotional succour did not entirely lift his gloom, however, which was compounded by the time it took for his injury even to be properly diagnosed. "For three or four months I saw many doctors," he tells me. "They couldn't agree. One says I need rest, another says I need surgery. Finally, I saw the right doctor, Richard Berger at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. I had confidence in him. I had surgery, and he fixed it."

Had it crossed his mind that he might never play again, or at least never as wonderfully as before? "If I say not, I would be a liar. You think about everything when you have so much time to think. And the tennis life is very short. But I am really Catholic, and I believe that God knows everything."

I already had an inkling of his religious faith, having seen him intently cross himself on clinching victory. But now he tells me something I didn't know, that there is a deeply poignant dimension to his prayers. "I had a sister who died many years ago, and I believe that she protects me from the sky. She was eight years old. It was a car accident in Argentina. I was five or six, so it was much worse for my parents."

Del Potro was raised in the mountains of Buenos Aires province, in Tandil, a city of little more than 100,000 people, celebrated in tennis circles as the birthplace in the last 40-odd years of no fewer than six men who would later reach the world top 100. Del Potro is the most illustrious of them, but another, Juan Monaco, briefly rose to 14th in the world, wonderful statistics for Tandil but dispiriting reading for the British, our entire country trumped by a smallish South American city.

So what is it about Tandil, I ask, that produces such fine tennis players? And footballers too, for that matter. Mauro Camoranesi, once of Juventus and Italy, grew up in Tandil, as did the Argentina international Mariano Gonzalez. Is it anything the Lawn Tennis Association could learn from? He smiles and shrugs. "I don't know. The beef maybe. And there is a very good coach, Marcelo Gomez, who was my coach when I was young. There are good coaches there, good courts, good gyms, good weather." They are powerful assets.

On his return to Tandil following his triumph at Flushing Meadows, practically the entire populace turned out to welcome him home. He was paraded through the streets on the back of a fire engine, strangely enough, and rather aptly turned on the waterworks. "I was crying. It was amazing. There were 100,000 people on the street, for sure. The tennis life is very short, as I say. And my first goal is always to be a good person. But it was amazing."

It was an amazing reception to mark an amazing achievement; not just the hoisting of the trophy, but the back-to-back defeats of Nadal and Federer. "Yes, that was very difficult in two days," he says, somewhat unnecessarily. "Against Rafa I said to myself, 'Maybe my tournament is done', but then I beat him 6-2, 6-2, 6-2 in an hour and a half. So then I said to myself, 'OK, now I am in the final of the best tournament in the world.' To me, the US Open was always the Grand Slam I wanted to win most. And I was close to reaching that goal. But Federer had not lost for five years. I tried not to think about that. I won [an epic five-setter] by taking it point by point."

It was his first Grand Slam final, and the way he dealt with the pressure rather raises the question of why Murray, in his first Grand Slam final, on the same court against the same opponent the previous year, had crumbled. "I don't know. It's very difficult for Murray, because he is the only player from your country. He's a really nice player. For me, he will win Grand Slams. He has everything. He can beat Nadal, Federer, Djokovic on all surfaces. I have never beaten Djokovic. But to win, first you have to know how to lose. Maybe he needs to lose more finals to win one."

Del Potro didn't. Played one, won one, is his Grand Slam finals tally. So how, in more detail, did he cope with the psychological burden of playing Federer in the arena where the great man had not lost since 2003? Was it not like going to Oz and taking on the wizard? A smile. "The night before the final I was talking all night with my friends, on the phone, friends from Tandil I have known since I was a young boy. I couldn't sleep, so I said 'Talk to me all night'. Without that, I would have been very nervous. So we talked for maybe four hours, not about tennis at all."

Winning the US Open, he adds gnomically, "changed everything, and changed nothing. It helped with contracts, tournaments, respect, but the really important things didn't change: my [relationship with my] parents and friends, my routine."

Nonetheless, the sports-mad Argentines took him to their collective hearts and his popularity, at least briefly, rivalled that of some of the nation's favourite footballers, if not perhaps those at the top of the tree.

"Carlos Tevez," says Del Potro, "is loved even more than Lionel Messi. Messi is a better player, and the most famous sportsman in Argentina, but Tevez is even more popular. He's a simple guy, they like that. He is a good friend of mine. In 2009 in London [at the ATP World Tour Finals] Tevez came on court and I played tennis with him for a few minutes. He made a good choice, becoming a soccer player." (He's not kidding; if you look on YouTube, Tevez looks as if he's never held a racket before).

Speaking of different sports, Del Potro's father was a keen amateur rugby player, but his own first love was football. "It was one day when I arrived early at soccer practice, and I had nothing to do, that a friend gave me a tennis racket. I hit a ball against a wall, and then I said to my parents that I wanted to start playing tennis as well. I played both until I was 12 years old, then I chose tennis. But I still love soccer."

If, then, I were to offer him a World Cup winners' medal with Argentina instead of his US Open victory, would he take it? He laughs. "No, I'll still take the US Open. But I think maybe in the future I can play soccer professionally. After my tennis career is over, it is in my mind. I am a centre-forward like Martin Palermo. Do you know him? He plays for Boca Juniors, my team." At the mention of Boca, and Palermo, his voice rises and he sits forward, eyes shining. But then he seems to remind himself what he is and where we are. "First I want to become a better tennis player. To become No 1. But it will take longer, after the injury."

The wrist problem was followed by a torn hip muscle that threatened his participation in the forthcoming French Open. On Wednesday, happily, he declared himself fit for Roland Garros, and after that his thoughts will turn to grass, a surface he has yet to master. He will play at Queen's, then Wimbledon, and dismisses the suggestion that his prodigious height is a disadvantage on grass because of the lower bounce.

"I think it helps me, because of my serve, and my movement. I have played at Queen's twice, but both times I lost against Nadal. He wasn't so good on grass either, at first. But the biggest players are the ones who know how to win on grass, so it will be good this year to see what I can do on that surface. I still have many things to learn, like serve and volley. I'm different from most Argentinian players: I want to get better on grass. And I really like London, when it doesn't rain." He grins. "Maybe Tevez will be there this year."

Juan Martin del Potro will compete against Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray and Andy Roddick in the AEGON Championships at the Queen's Club, 6-12 June. For more information, go to www.aegonchampionships.com

Del Potro's highs and lows

Born 23 September, 1988, Tandil, Argentina

Professional debut May 2004

Highest ranking No 4 (January 2010)

Current rank No 27

Career titles 9

Grand Slam wins US Open 2009

Began his tennis career at the age of six and made his professional debut against Matias Niemiz in 2004, aged 15.

2005 Turns pro and becomes youngest ever player to feature in top 200.

2006 Grand Slam debut at French Open, losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero

2007 Plays in first Wimbledon, going out to eventual winner Roger Federer

2008 Makes top 10 for first time. Wins first ATP title at Mercedes Cup in Stutt-gart, beating Richard Gasquet, first of four consecutive tournament wins. Loses to Andy Murray in last eight of US Open.

2009 Wins first Grand Slam, beating Roger Federer in US Open final. Finalist in ATP Tour finals.

2010 Achieves career-high ranking of No 4. Misses most of year with wrist injury.

Alex Corrigan

« Last Edit: May 21, 2011, 01:17:22 AM by swish »

Offline Start da Game

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 6785
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #263 on: May 21, 2011, 01:30:32 PM »
swish, del potro has a big bro in india.......

Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #264 on: May 23, 2011, 05:46:50 PM »
swish, del potro has a big bro in india.......




Bring him down to RG.......   ;-()




Offline FedFanForever

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 3734
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #265 on: May 23, 2011, 05:54:03 PM »
Glad to see DelPo took out the trash...
Then we will fight in the shade.

Offline Start da Game

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 6785
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #266 on: August 03, 2011, 12:29:07 PM »
del potro is one of the players to beat at the us open........top 4 better don't take him lightly.......he's looked really good at french open and wimbledon........
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline Jovan

  • Tennis Player
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #267 on: August 06, 2011, 02:05:17 AM »
Juan Martin del Potro: 'To win, first you have to know how to lose'

 "That [kind of fraternity] is more important than the actual game. If the others care about you it means you are a good person. For me that's more important than playing good tennis."

 "The tennis life is very short, as I say. And my first goal is always to be a good person. But it was amazing."


i like this.  :cool:

Offline tonaiden

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 1668
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #268 on: August 31, 2011, 10:20:34 PM »
6-3, 6-1, 6-1



Q.  How does it feel to get your first win after your title here?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  I feel really glad.  Was a short match, you know, against Volandri, but I served well.  I was improving my game during the match. And so be playing here after win here, it's special.  It's my favorite tournament, so I'm really happy to take the opportunity to play here again.

Q.  Last time you were here you won the championship.  What does it feel like to be back?  If you couldn't defend your title, maybe this is, in a way, a defense of your title from two years ago, if you will.

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Yeah.  Has been a really sad year, 2010, for me, and I always say. This year to be playing the US Open, it's amazing, it's great, and I'm feeling really glad to see the crowd again, to see the Argentinian fans come to see me specially play here in the US Open. I'm really exciting to keep improving my game, to keep winning here.  Hopefully be ready for my next match and win again.

Q.  You have called it your favorite tournament several times.  A lot of players say this is crazy and noisy compared to the other Grand Slams.  Do you find that to be helpful, or are you just able to shut it all out or what?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  I don't know.  When I was so young, I so want to be at this tournament, I say, Okay, this is my favorite.  It will be a dream if I win this tournament, and then the dream comes true. I'm really enjoy the crowd, the fans are crazy, and they are very excited.  Every match, the crowds are full every match. For me that's help me to fight.  I remember in the final two years ago when I was two sets to one down and they help me, started cheering more for me than Roger, and that's help me a lot to win the final.

Q.  Do you feel like in your mind you're the defending champion and you're defending your title because you won here last year? [Sic]

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Well, I am feeling very special these couple of days, because I wasn't here last year so I couldn't see my name in the locker room, you know, and many things.  That's special, but are pretty little details. But, you know, it's an honor be part of the champions of this tournament.

Q.  You said last year was a sad year for you.  Was that just because of the wrist surgery, or was there other stuff going on?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Yeah, just for my wrist problem.  It took a long time to fix it and then to come back, but I think that was the past.  Completely behind me.  I can play the tennis again.

Q.  Do you ever feel any residual pain or discomfort in your wrist?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Sometimes when the weather is very humid I feel something, but nothing dangerous.  I play in all surface this year and I'm doing well season, so I'm very glad just to be playing. Hopefully next year I will be ready for play in same conditions as the top 10 players.  I don't know if I gonna be there, but I will try.

Q.  Where do you feel your game is right now compared to how it was in '09?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  I don't know.  I keep improving very slowly.  That's important.  I'm serving    I think I'm serving much better than two years ago or in the beginning of this year. I know that other players are playing much better than me at this moment, especially the top 10 players.  But I repeat:  to be here playing this tournament, for me it's a great signal for my future.  I know I'm getting closer to my best level, and that's important.

Q.  What were your emotions when you stepped onto the grounds here for the first time since having won the championship?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  It's very, very strong, you know, see the fans, the crowds.  After the match the guy who was with the microphone, he say the only player who beat No. 1 No. 2 of player of the world in the Grand Slam.  You know, it's an honor. And I want to say thank you to the fans, to the Argentinian people who come to see me play here.  I know who was behind me in the right moments and I know who are in this moment, too.

Q.  Is it hard to believe it was two years ago, or does it seem like it was two years ago?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Yeah, to be honest, I feel like the final was yesterday, because when I was walking around the street or when I talk with the fans, they say, I remember your final; you can repeat; you can win again. It's every, every day, every time say or talk about this tournament.

Q.  If you have to make a list of what is missing your game, where do you start from?  It will be a little bit probably of everything, but what specifically more?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  More consistent, I think.  It's difficult to remain in a good level all the year.  I need matches and tournaments to do that.  I am improving my serve and I improve my game on grass court, and I play really a great game against Nadal there. That's a signal to my future.  I know I have to be more focused in the important moments playing against top 10 players, but, you know, that takes time. I myself want to be healthy this season, and then training hard for the next season.

Q.  You said the fans were encouraging you and telling you that you could win again.  Do you believe you can?

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  I don't know, but if I made once, you never know what can happen.  I won here, and then the last year I couldn't play in any tournament. So maybe in the future. But at this time, for me, just be here playing this tournament or playing tennis again, it's amazing.

Q.  You sound like you trust more yourself for 2012 than in 2011.

JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO:  Yeah, can be true.  I know I'm getting closer, but today many players are playing better than me. But this is tennis.  Every player can beat anyone, especially in Grand Slam, five set matches, you know, and two weeks of tournament. So just be focused, and then if you have the chance or if you see the chance, go to it.

Offline Start da Game

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 6785
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #269 on: September 01, 2011, 02:10:51 PM »
del potro is one of the players to beat at the us open........top 4 better don't take him lightly.......he's looked really good at french open and wimbledon........
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline Alex

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 12236
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #270 on: September 05, 2011, 09:21:49 AM »
del potro is one of the players to beat at the us open........top 4 better don't take him lightly.......he's looked really good at french open and wimbledon........
and what happened?  :zipped:

Offline Start da Game

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 6785
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #271 on: September 05, 2011, 11:53:58 AM »
del potro is one of the players to beat at the us open........top 4 better don't take him lightly.......he's looked really good at french open and wimbledon........
and what happened?  :zipped:

he probably wasn't in top condition for this event.......by the way yesterday was pretty high humid day in new york and even simon looked gassed out at the end........a cooler day, maybe we would have had the expected result but there's no excuse of course........nadal cramped up in the presser after his match........it was hilarious, he was speaking in spanish and suddenly he got cramps in the right leg........

 

Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline monstertruck

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 12316
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #272 on: September 05, 2011, 01:06:33 PM »
del potro is one of the players to beat at the us open........top 4 better don't take him lightly.......he's looked really good at french open and wimbledon........
and what happened?  :zipped:
Oh, you're just beggin' for it, aren'tcha?
CONK da ball!!!

Online ashwin#1

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 619
  • Gender: Male
  • The Best
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #273 on: December 06, 2011, 07:26:24 AM »
Del Potro’s Outfit for the year’s first Major ( aus open 2012), and the next picture underlines the Argentine’s shoes and other pieces from the collection.




« Last Edit: December 06, 2011, 07:31:01 AM by ashwin#1 »
You can ignore reality, but you can't ignore the consequences of ignoring reality.

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #274 on: December 07, 2011, 10:58:11 PM »
Here's some news a few days old.
 
Nadal: Del Potro will crack top 4 in 2012
Ticker - Monday, December 5, 2011
 
 
 
After beating Juan Martin Del Potro in a long four-set match to clinch the Davis Cup for Spain, Rafael Nadal says that the Argentine might be able to reach the top of the game in 2012.

"Del Potro has a very high level as a player," he told reporters of the 2009 U.S. Open champion. "It's all relative. For a long time he was giving incredible shots that nobody else can do. He will be a very good player. It's clear that he's a candidate for No. 1. He will be amongst the first four players in the world next year.  He's a very complete player. He doesn't have any cracks in his game. He's very solid. He will be unstoppable next year if the [wrist] injury allows him."

 
 

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #275 on: December 07, 2011, 10:59:08 PM »
Del Potro’s Outfit for the year’s first Major ( aus open 2012), and the next picture underlines the Argentine’s shoes and other pieces from the collection.






 
Nice stuff, colors are brilliant.
 

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #276 on: December 10, 2011, 12:35:24 AM »
The Apia International Sydney will be held at Sydney Olympic Park Tennis Centre from
Sunday 8 to Saturday 14 January 2012.


Del Potro To Begin 2012 Season In Sydney
Sydney, Australia

World No. 11 and former US Open champion Juan Martin del Potro has confirmed he will begin the 2012 season at the Apia International Sydney.

The Argentine will return to the Sydney Olympic Park Tennis Centre in January for the second straight year and will join fellow former top 10 players Lleyton Hewitt and Marcos Baghdatis in the men’s draw.


Del Potro, who was granted a wild card into the event earlier this year, said he had great memories of his time in Sydney and was looking forward to returning. “Sydney is a great city and I like the tournament very much,” del Potro said. “In Sydney they gave me one of the first wild cards after my injury and I appreciate this very much from them.

“The people at the tournament and also in Sydney were very nice to me and my team and I remember this. I hope I can do very well in January because the tournament has a great history and tradition and a lot of players from Argentina have played in it and done very well. I would love to see all the fans from Argentina come to the tennis to support me.”

Tournament Director Craig Watson welcomed the addition of del Potro to the Apia International Sydney  men’s field. “We are delighted that Juan Martin del Potro will begin his season at the Apia International Sydney again,” Watson said. “He played one of the matches of the tournament in 2011 against Feliciano Lopez in the first round and I know he won a lot of new fans in Sydney with that gutsy performance.

“He is close to getting back to the form that took him to the US Open title in 2009, as well as wins over Federer and Nadal. “I understand that many observers believe that he will be back in the world’s Top 5 before too long and another Grand Slam title could be on the cards in 2012. I’m certain he will come to the Apia International Sydney early in the New Year fired up and ready to get his season off to a winning start.”

The 23-year-old del Potro began 2011 ranked No. 258 after battling a wrist injury throughout the 2010 season. ATP World Tour titles in Delray Beach in February and Estoril in April, along with strong showings in Vienna (finalist), Indian Wells and Valencia (semi-finalist) saw del Potro finish the year as World No. 11.

Del Potro also led Argentina to the Davis Cup final in Spain last weekend after defeating defending champions Serbia in the semi-finals.


Offline FedFanForever

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 3734
  • Gender: Male
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #277 on: December 10, 2011, 04:15:21 AM »
I get the feeling that Juan is just about to bust loose big time again. He's the X-factor.
Then we will fight in the shade.

Offline propstoart

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 635
  • Gender: Male
  • Fighting Fair
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #278 on: December 10, 2011, 05:04:23 AM »
I get the feeling that Juan is just about to bust loose big time again. He's the X-factor.
The way Del Potro plays, he better start winning tourneys before he busts his wrist again.. He has one of the flattest forehands in the game and he plays from way back in the court - I wonder if JMDP can do anything to lessen the stress on his wrist or will he carry on in the same vein and hope for good fortune and good health!! :(
« Last Edit: December 13, 2011, 01:32:20 PM by propstoart »

Offline Swish

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 10283
  • Gender: Male
  • How Many Times?
Re: The Juan Martín del Potro Bandwagon
« Reply #279 on: December 10, 2011, 04:02:02 PM »
I get the feeling that Juan is just about to bust loose big time again. He's the X-factor.
The way Del Potro, he either start winning tourneys before he busts his wrist again.. He has one of the flattest forehands in the game and he plays from way back in the court - I wonder if JMDP can do anything to lessen the stress on his wrist or will he carry on in the same vein and hope for good fortune and good health!! :(

I think he'll continue the way he always had, he doesn't have too many other options.