Author Topic: VAMOS RAFA !!! (Post match-reviews, pictures,articles, videos etc. about Nadal)  (Read 361109 times)

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Offline conchita

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The men's singles final in figures
By Guillaume Baraise

2 Rafael Nadal is the second ever champion to have won four consecutive titles in the French Open’s history. Björn Borg accomplished the same feat between 1978 and 1981.

2 It is only the second time in the history of the open era that a singles Grand Slam final line up was identical for three years running. Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg went head-to-head at Wimbledon in 1988, 1989 and 1990.

3 Roger Federer has notched up three finals so far at Roland Garros and has lost them all. He has won all twelve other Grand Slam finals he has played in.

4 It is only the fourth time in the Open era that a men’s singles champion has won without dropping a single set. Before Rafa, only Ilie Nastase in 1973, and Björn Borg in 1978 and 1980 managed this feat.

4 With four victories under his belt, Rafael Nadal has equaled Henri Cochet’s record, who won in 1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932. Only Björn Borg, with six titles, beats the Spaniard in his number of wins at Roland Garros

5 This was the fifth consecutive Grand Slam final to be fought between two Europeans. Chilean Fernando Gonzalez, finalist in the 2007 Australian Open, was the last non-European to play in a major tournament final.

15 This was Roger Federer’s fifteenth Grand Slam final. Only ten players have ever equalled this in the history of the Open. The record is held by Ivan Lendl, who notched up 19 finals.

17 This was Nadal and Federer’s seventeenth head-to-head, and takes the Spaniard’s lead to 11-6.

28 Rafa has won all 28 matches he has played at Roland Garros. He now holds the position of fifth best winning streak in a Grand Slam tournament. The record is 41 consecutive victories, held by Björn Borg at Wimbledon between 1976 and 1981.

44 Rafael Nadal has chalked up his 44th win on the ATP tour this year. He overtakes Novak Djokovic, who has won 37 times so far.

149 Roger Federer’s Grand Slam victory tally stalls at 149. He has now lost a total of 24 times.

2001 The last number one seed to win the men’s singles final was Gustavo Kuerten in 2001.

1.000,000 Nadal takes away a cool one million euros for his win today.
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline Start da Game

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the only thing that comes to my mind when i hear or see rafa getting injured is the amount of hardcourt tennis that he plays.to me these injuries of his r all due to his heavy participation on those no cushion,stressful hardcourts.......well, it might look funny but what i feel is,all the reasons y rafa gets injured so frequently boil down to one serious thing n that's the flat forehand that he's reluctant to use on hards.......one flat forehand of his ll prevent him from running for 3 to 4 extra shots every point which helps his body enormously over a length of time.......added to his voes, he is playing doubles in every HC tourney which can be reasoned as his dedication towards olympic medal for his country.now that hell of a lot tennis.....i m sure he won't play doubles again after olympics.

as far as HC tennis is concerned,i ve always felt that rafa shud only take part in all the masters events n GS with the exemption of chennai open coz he needs a warm up before a GS like oz open, not that coz i m an indian ;-().......that ll keep him fresh n ll make him raring to go.......too much of anything is good for nothing.maybe he wudn't ve cared much about his HC defeats but definitely this defeat of his ll remind him the  gruelling amount of tennis that he's playing........

Lots of players play on hard courts and don't have the same issues. Yes his effort level is a step above most, but is it that much more that he can't stay healthy where others can?
He has to play on hards because that's almost half the rankings points. In addition 4 of the MS and one GS are on hards. He has to show up for the MS tourneys as they are mandatory, and he has to do well in them to maintain his ranking. Not playing on hard courts is not an option.
yes, he shud play all the mandatory events.that's what i meant. there r 7 MS on hards(if u include the carpet event in paris n yr end masters cup) n 3 on clay. he shud play all those events along with the 4 GS. never said against that. now the remaining 4 or 5 events(to round off the 18 or 19 events for the ATP rankings) that he plays shud be on clay but not on hards.......he shud skip tournos like dubai,rotterdam,etc. added to that he's playing doubles in atleast 9 to 10 events out of those 18 or 19.......now that's tons n tons of tennis............
but he plays the small tourneys because he wants to improve on hard courts, I agree he should play on clay in Latin America instead of hards, look at the list of champions there, he should won all the small touneys on clay
2009 schedule should be:
4 grand slams, 9 MS and 3 500 events: Acapulco, Barcelona - clay, Valencia carpet and two small but prestigious tourneys like Stuttgart or Kitzbuhel, Queens and Chennai -to get ready for SW19 and AO.
agree with that. not to forget TMC as well........chennai n the 7 MS(including TMC) shud form his HC schedule.so overall 8 HC tourneys in a yr is ok......i don't quite buy that theory that he wud improve on hards if he plays more n more HC tennis.......coz it's not the age now to do so.he's an established ATP player already. he shud ve experimented with his HC schedule in his junior days........he shud plan his HC tourneys cleverly n give his best shot at them.that keeps him fresh always........
yes, I agree it's not the age to do so...he should play more on hist best surface and forget all hardcourts tourneys that are not MS! Last year he played 20 tourneys including Masters Cup. that could be a great schedule for 2009:
1-Chennai (hards)
2-GS-AO (hards)
3-Brazil (clay)
4-500 Acapulco (clay)
5-MS Indian Wells (hards)
6-MS Miami (hards)
7-MS Monte Carlo (clay)
8-500 Barcelona (clay)
9-MS Rome (clay)
10-MS Madrid (clay)
11-GS-FO (clay)
12-Queens (grass)
13-GS-Wimby (grass)
14-Stuttgart (clay)
15-MS Canada (hards)
16-MS Cincy (hards)
17-GS-USO (hards)
18-MS Shanghai (hards)
19-500 Valencia (carpet)
20-MS Paris (carpet)
then Masters Cup in London! 7 torneys on clay, 8 on hards, 2 on grass and 2 on carpet -he can add Baires or Kitzbuhel on clay and he should not play in 500 Rotterdam, 500 Dubai but he can win some valuable points in the asian swing: 500 Beijing, 500 Tokyo -and not play in 500 Basel-
correct me if i m wrong, aren't the no. of events considered for ATP rankings 18? so y does he need to take part in 21 events? doing so,he wud tax his body so much.......so, i don't really mind if he skips acapulko, cincy(despite a masters event, tell u y) n valencia........cincy is a masters event which just like hamburg following rome, starts right after the roger's cup.......now, bear in mind it's hard court stuff n wud exhaust rafa before US instead of serving him well for the US open...... moreover he's got nothing to lose at cincy this yr, as he retired very early in the tourno last yr.......so, it ll be better if he makes a habbit of skipping cincy.......remember rafa never played hamburg til last yr so y not do that at cincy where his chances wud be little to gain anything.......i m a firm believer that a player like rafa doesn't need much practice(he wud get that in rogers cup), given his style of play. instead a good rest for a week or 10 days before a big tourney like US open wud charge his batteries considerably n keep him fresh........
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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Nadal destroys Federer to win French Open   


PARIS (Reuters) - Rafael Nadal produced a flawless exhibition of claycourt tennis to demolish world number one Roger Federer 6-1 6-3 6-0 on Sunday and win his fourth straight French Open title.

The Spaniard was at his relentless best as he tore Federer apart in one hour 48 minutes to deny the Swiss a career grand slam and equal Bjorn Borg's feat of four consecutive titles at Roland Garros.

"I played a perfect match," said Nadal, who was presented with the trophy by Borg.

"I'm sorry for that final but you played well," he told Federer. "I want to thank Roger for his attitude on the court."

Federer, beaten in the final by Nadal in the two previous years, had promised to attack but made too many errors early on as Nadal ripped through the first set.

The Swiss raised himself in the second set and had a break point at 3-3 but Nadal slammed the door shut and crushed a hapless Federer in the third to clinch the title without losing a set, leaving Federer stuck on 12 grand-slam titles.

"I would have hoped to do better than four games but Rafael is very, very strong," Federer told the crowd.

"He dominated this tournament like maybe no one before except Borg, so congratulations Rafa.

"It was still a good week. Losing in a final is never easy but I will try again next year."

Nadal broke the world number one three times as he raced through the first set in 32 minutes.


Federer, chasing the only grand-slam title to elude him, began shakily and three forehand errors gave second seed Nadal the break in the first game.

IMMEDIATE RESPONSE

The Spaniard saved two break points in the next game and though Federer saved two more break points in his next service game, he was broken to love two games later as Nadal surged ahead 4-1.

Top seed Federer tried to get to the net whenever he could but Nadal passed him at will and broke for a third time to take the set as Federer put a forehand volley long.

The Swiss looked shell-shocked and when he dropped his serve to trail 2-0 in the second set, he had won just 16 points in the entire match.

His response, though, was immediate and he broke back in the next game with his best all-round tennis of the match.

Becoming more aggressive and serving-and-volleying at times, Federer saved a break point to level at 2-2, then forced a break point at 3-3, only to net a backhand as Nadal held on.

That proved to be the turning point of the set and Nadal rifled a backhand down the line to break in the next game and served out for a two-set lead.

Though Federer saved two break points in the opening game of the third set, Nadal snatched the break on his third chance when Federer netted a forehand.

Nadal repeated the feat twice and served out to take the title when Federer's forehand went long.

It was the first time that Federer had lost a set to love since the first round of the Queen's Club tournament in London in 1999, against Zimbabwean Byron Black.

It was the shortest French Open men's final in terms of games played since 1977 and the quickest final, at 108 minutes, since 1980.
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the only thing that comes to my mind when i hear or see rafa getting injured is the amount of hardcourt tennis that he plays.to me these injuries of his r all due to his heavy participation on those no cushion,stressful hardcourts.......well, it might look funny but what i feel is,all the reasons y rafa gets injured so frequently boil down to one serious thing n that's the flat forehand that he's reluctant to use on hards.......one flat forehand of his ll prevent him from running for 3 to 4 extra shots every point which helps his body enormously over a length of time.......added to his voes, he is playing doubles in every HC tourney which can be reasoned as his dedication towards olympic medal for his country.now that hell of a lot tennis.....i m sure he won't play doubles again after olympics.

as far as HC tennis is concerned,i ve always felt that rafa shud only take part in all the masters events n GS with the exemption of chennai open coz he needs a warm up before a GS like oz open, not that coz i m an indian ;-().......that ll keep him fresh n ll make him raring to go.......too much of anything is good for nothing.maybe he wudn't ve cared much about his HC defeats but definitely this defeat of his ll remind him the  gruelling amount of tennis that he's playing........

Lots of players play on hard courts and don't have the same issues. Yes his effort level is a step above most, but is it that much more that he can't stay healthy where others can?
He has to play on hards because that's almost half the rankings points. In addition 4 of the MS and one GS are on hards. He has to show up for the MS tourneys as they are mandatory, and he has to do well in them to maintain his ranking. Not playing on hard courts is not an option.
yes, he shud play all the mandatory events.that's what i meant. there r 7 MS on hards(if u include the carpet event in paris n yr end masters cup) n 3 on clay. he shud play all those events along with the 4 GS. never said against that. now the remaining 4 or 5 events(to round off the 18 or 19 events for the ATP rankings) that he plays shud be on clay but not on hards.......he shud skip tournos like dubai,rotterdam,etc. added to that he's playing doubles in atleast 9 to 10 events out of those 18 or 19.......now that's tons n tons of tennis............
but he plays the small tourneys because he wants to improve on hard courts, I agree he should play on clay in Latin America instead of hards, look at the list of champions there, he should won all the small touneys on clay
2009 schedule should be:
4 grand slams, 9 MS and 3 500 events: Acapulco, Barcelona - clay, Valencia carpet and two small but prestigious tourneys like Stuttgart or Kitzbuhel, Queens and Chennai -to get ready for SW19 and AO.
agree with that. not to forget TMC as well........chennai n the 7 MS(including TMC) shud form his HC schedule.so overall 8 HC tourneys in a yr is ok......i don't quite buy that theory that he wud improve on hards if he plays more n more HC tennis.......coz it's not the age now to do so.he's an established ATP player already. he shud ve experimented with his HC schedule in his junior days........he shud plan his HC tourneys cleverly n give his best shot at them.that keeps him fresh always........
yes, I agree it's not the age to do so...he should play more on hist best surface and forget all hardcourts tourneys that are not MS! Last year he played 20 tourneys including Masters Cup. that could be a great schedule for 2009:
1-Chennai (hards)
2-GS-AO (hards)
3-Brazil (clay)
4-500 Acapulco (clay)
5-MS Indian Wells (hards)
6-MS Miami (hards)
7-MS Monte Carlo (clay)
8-500 Barcelona (clay)
9-MS Rome (clay)
10-MS Madrid (clay)
11-GS-FO (clay)
12-Queens (grass)
13-GS-Wimby (grass)
14-Stuttgart (clay)
15-MS Canada (hards)
16-MS Cincy (hards)
17-GS-USO (hards)
18-MS Shanghai (hards)
19-500 Valencia (carpet)
20-MS Paris (carpet)
then Masters Cup in London! 7 torneys on clay, 8 on hards, 2 on grass and 2 on carpet -he can add Baires or Kitzbuhel on clay and he should not play in 500 Rotterdam, 500 Dubai but he can win some valuable points in the asian swing: 500 Beijing, 500 Tokyo -and not play in 500 Basel-
correct me if i m wrong, aren't the no. of events considered for ATP rankings 18? so y does he need to take part in 21 events? doing so,he wud tax his body so much.......so, i don't really mind if he skips acapulko, cincy(despite a masters event, tell u y) n valencia........cincy is a masters event which just like hamburg following rome, starts right after the roger's cup.......now, bear in mind it's hard court stuff n wud exhaust rafa before US instead of serving him well for the US open...... moreover he's got nothing to lose at cincy this yr, as he retired very early in the tourno last yr.......so, it ll be better if he makes a habbit of skipping cincy.......remember rafa never played hamburg til last yr so y not do that at cincy where his chances wud be little to gain anything.......i m a firm believer that a player like rafa doesn't need much practice(he wud get that in rogers cup), given his style of play. instead a good rest for a week or 10 days before a big tourney like US open wud charge his batteries considerably n keep him fresh........
I prefer not to comment about the us open series, 6 weeks in summer with only 2 big events Cincy and Canada. Boring! who really cares about New Haven, Indy, Washington and LA. I hate this part of the year!
but take 6 weeks in the clay season, you will find: Rome, Monte Carlo, Madrid, Barcelona, Estoril-Hamburg-Valencia, and the weeek prior to RG.....
that's UNFAIR and this is the big turning point for Rafa, just imagine for a second taking the ratio of the us open series (only 2 MS in 6 weeks) the claycourt season before RG FOR RAFA should be at least 9 weeks with  7 days before each big MS!
It's obvious that the atp schedule is for american fans (that mostly hate clay) just remember how Rafa reacted when they moved Miami one week later to allow fans to watch college hoops.
that's right conchita........north american HC season is really boring n these days american tennis revolves around glamour leaving aside the actual quality of tennis.as n when wimby finishes, i wait desperately for the indoor season to begin.i get really bored with all that US tournos.......n those must be arrogant a$$***** to give priority to some college games leaving aside an international event like miami masters.......
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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Invincible Nadal makes it four in a row

Rolandgarros.com By Guillaume Baraise

Rafael Nadal made it four French Open titles in a row and emulated Bjorn Borg's record of 28 consecutive wins at Roland Garros with a commanding 6-1 6-3 6-0 victory over Roger Federer in the final.

Nadal did what he did throughout the tournament, playing virtually faultless tennis. Federer was faced with the same dilemma as all of the world No2’s opponents these past two weeks – defend and be ground down or attack and run the risk of being passed, passed and passed again. The Swiss No1 seed tried both tactics and neither paid off.

Before the match, history was beckoning. Nadal was aiming for his fourth consecutive title in Paris, under the watchful eye of Borg who was the only man to have managed the same feat. He was the hot favourite to win, Federer only once having defeated his great rival in nine meetings on clay. The Spaniard had triumphed over the world No1 in their last three meetings at Roland Garros – each time in four sets and twice in the final.

Most of the lucky 14,000 spectators on Philippe Chatrier court were hoping to witness history of another kind, with Federer looking to become only the sixth player of all time to win all four Grand Slam tournaments and the only player apart from Andre Agassi to win them on four different surfaces. And if Federer could finally defeat the undisputed king of clay, he would undoubtedly be considered the greatest player of all time.

And so the match began after a ceremony celebrating the 80th anniversary of the stadium including a parade of former champions including Borg, Wilander, Nastase, Santana, Vilas and of course Yannick Noah who received the loudest round of applause. Then Federer and Nadal were introduced each receiving equally loud cheers from the crowd.

However, the spectators quickly decided that they were on the Swiss player’s side, not out of affection but in an effort to prolong the suspense. Nadal quickly took the lead, breaking Federer in the opening game thanks to three errors on the Swiss player’s forehand. At 2-1 Nadal suddenly swept through the next 26 points, winning 23.

At 6-1, 2-0 it already looked like a massacre. Nadal was unstoppable, firing forehands, seeing every ball and chasing down everything. Federer was being completely outplayed. Neither his serve nor his forehand were hurting Nadal and he seemed to have no idea as to how to react – he was simply being outclassed.

One chance for Federer

With the public cheering him on, Federer finally awoke from his slumber. A cross-court backhand on the line followed by a devastating forehand saw him break back at 2-1 and hold to level at 2-2. But winning one point would not win him the tournament. To do that, he would have to perform a miracle as Nadal was playing at an unbelievable level. The Spaniard was not missing any returns, forehands, backhands or passing shots. In the entire match he committed a paltry seven unforced errors.

At one point in the match – just one – there was a moment of suspense. At 3-3 in the second set the world No1 fought tooth and nail against the Spanish onslaught and finally managed to secure a break point on Nadal’s serve. Chants of “Roger, Roger,” filled Philippe Chatrier court, but a Nadal drop shot forced the backhand error from Federer to wipe out his advantage.

Although it was not yet clear, the match was already over. Federer’s one slim chance had passed and, in the next game, Nadal took the Swiss player’s serve on his fourth break point with an almost relaxed-looking backhand. 5-3 became 6-3 and the scoreboard read two sets to love after one hour and twenty two minutes of play. The twelve-time Grand Slam champion was drowning…

Better than Gottfried, but only just

Sickened by his own poor level of play and disgusted by that of Nadal, the agony would be brief for the world’s best player in the third set. The atmosphere in the stadium was almost one of embarrassment, with the former champions sitting in the presidential box looking shocked in front of such an unbelievable spectacle. Federer had never seemed so lost, and his unforced errors mounted up as Nadal clocked up more and more points.

The Spaniard, however, did not show any mercy. He stuck the knife in, delighting the crowd with some of his famed whipped forehands. A final unforced error from Federer – his 35th – put an end to contest that never was. Rafa meanwhile remained subdued in victory, simply raising his hands to the sky and smiling with satisfaction. 6-1 6-3 6-0 in 1 hour 48 minutes- the fewest number of games lost by a champion since Guillermo Vilas beat Brian Gottfried 6-0 6-3 6-0 in 1977.

Federer looked almost bewildered as he sat down at the end of the match, having lost a set to love for the first time since Queen’s in 1999. In his speech to the crowd he even said “Yes, it’s me,” as if there had been some doubt.

Speaking later on television, Nadal was generous about his rival. “I’m very happy, but I’m also disappointed for Roger. It’s wonderful what he’s done for tennis.” It is also wonderful what the Spaniard has done for tennis. Rarely in the history of the French Open has a player appeared so invincible. Of course, there was Borg, who was on hand to present the Coupe des Mousquetaires to the victor in what could be called a changing of the guard.
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Offline conchita

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Wimbledon - Borg tips Nadal to win Wimbledon

Five-times Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg is tipping Rafael Nadal to end Roger Federer's winning streak at Wimbledon next month.

The Swede, the last man to win the French Open and Wimbledon in the same year, in 1980, said the Spaniard's improvement on grass and overall confidence meant he could win the title at the All England Club.

Last year, world number one Federer equalled Borg's record of five straight Wimbledon titles and he will be a big favourite to make it six this time.

However, Borg, speaking in Paris on the eve of the French Open final which, for the third year in succession, will be between Federer and Nadal, gave the Spaniard his support for Wimbledon.

"If he survives the first two or three rounds this year, then I pick Nadal to win Wimbledon," Borg said on Saturday.

"I was the same. If I survived those matches, then I started to play good tennis. I think it's going to be the same for Nadal.

"He has a little bit more difficulty than Federer coming to Wimbledon but if he survives the first couple (of) rounds, he's going to be really dangerous at Wimbledon."

Borg said the mental and physical effort of winning the French Open was huge but the confidence gained from victory at Roland Garros meant that winning back-to-back in Paris and Wimbledon was possible.

"Of course you're mentally tired after this tournament," he said. "Paris is the toughest tournament mentally and physically to win so to say you're not tired, the players are lying.

"But the thing is that at Wimbledon, if you survive, then you start to play good tennis.

"Nadal's playing really good on the grass. He's feeling very comfortable. The way he played last year, it was an unbelievable final. He was very unfortunate not to win that particular match. He had chances.

"I'm sure after losing a match like that he wants to come back and try to win that championship."

The Wimbledon championships run from June 23 to July 6.

Reuters 
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

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where r u all?
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

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Nadal: I was near perfect!!! 

Rafael Nadal said he played near to perfection in his 6-1 6-3 6-0 drubbing of world number one Roger Federer for his record-equalling fourth consecutive French Open title.

The second-seeded Spaniard, who is unbeaten on the Paris clay since his debut in 2005, prevailed after only one hour and 48 minutes against a clumsy top seed.

"I did not expect a match like this," Nadal said. "I think I played an almost perfect match. Roger played more mistakes than usual and I played more inside the court.

"I improved a little bit since last year. I have more control of the points, I am more aggressive than usual."

The 22-year-old Mallorcan said he was now more of a complete player, having dropped fewer than two games per set en route to his 28th consecutive win in Paris.

"I play more inside the court, not just two metres behind the baseline," said Nadal.

"I improved my slice, I change more directions. I hit more flat shots, especially with the backhand."

Although his level of play suggested he could be a threat to Federer on grass and hardcourts, Nadal shrugged off comparisons with the world number one.

"I feel like the number two because I am the number two and I am closer to the number three than the number one," he said.

Nadal was respectful of his beaten opponent, refusing to celebrate in effusive fashion just after the match point.

"Even if I'm playing my best tennis, I don't win 6-1 6-3 6-0," he said.

"He did not play very well, otherwise this result would not have been possible.

"I did not prepare (for any celebrations). Today it was tough for Roger, I had to show respect. I have a good relationship with him."

Nadal, who looks set to beat Borg's record of six Roland Garros titles, said the match turned his way for good in the seventh game of the second set.

On a break point, Federer anticipated a drop shot and, instead of playing it safe, went for a backhand winner which eventually ended into the net.

"I saved a very good point at 3-3. It was the game of the match," said Nadal.

Reuters 
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

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Monitoring Gotham City from the roofs of the taller buildings.
betta be careful, u might slip into spiderman's underware(rather the overware) from those buildings.that fella always "wizks" between those buildings, a new-sense.......   
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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It was the shortest French Open men's final in terms of games played since 1977 and the quickest final, at 108 minutes, since 1980.
Rafa equals Bjorn Borg's feat of four consecutive titles at Roland Garros.
It is only the fourth time in the Open era that a men’s singles champion has won without dropping a single set. Before Rafa, only Ilie Nastase in 1973, and Björn Borg in 1978 and 1980 managed this feat.
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

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@the batman
nice to have some humorous comments, did i sound a bit bad mate?
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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RAFA NADAL 2008 FRENCH OPEN CHAMPION!!
I could only find some pics!!  :(





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Offline conchita

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RAFA NADAL 2008 FRENCH OPEN CHAMPION!!




Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

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With the advice of some buddies, i ve decided to create this thread. Let all the discussions related to rafa be posted in this thread which is apt.Let the great 'limitaions' thread remain to discuss about rafa's shortcomings.Thanks....... 
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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Nadal shrugs off talk of world's best player

PARIS (AFP) - Rafael Nadal insists his standing as the world's second best player is accurate, but many who witnessed his French Open humiliation of Roger Federer believe the king's crown sits on the wrong head.

The Spaniard's 6-1, 6-3, 6-0 win took him alongside Bjorn Borg as the only man to achieve four successive Roland Garros titles.

His win over the top seed was the shortest final in 27 years and the most comprehensive since Guillermo Vilas gave up just three games in 1977 against Brian Gottfried.

It was also the 22-year-old's 11th win in 17 meetings with Federer and his ninth in 10 on clay.

Furthermore, the French Open mauling will only serve to crank up the pressure on Federer when he defends the Wimbledon title he has won for the last five years.

In his present insecurity, Federer will remember only too well how close Nadal came to snatching his All England Club crown in their epic five-set final in 2007.

But when it comes to rankings and reputation, Nadal believes that Federer, who lost his Australian Open title this year and whose one trophy came via an injury default in Estoril, deserves to be still considered as the top player.

"I feel like No. 2, because I am. I am No. 2, and closer to the No. 3 than the No. 1," said Nadal, ever wary of the growing threat from Novak Djokovic.

"But I am playing at a very good level. I am No. 1 in the race (the annual rankings). That's true, so that's important."

Federer's third successive defeat in the Roland Garros final to Nadal was the worst of his career.

Tellingly, the 22-year-old Spaniard avoided his traditional roll of celebration on the red clay of Court Philippe Chatrier at the moment of victory.

"It was tough for Roger and I have to be respectful with one very good guy," said Nadal of a man who, with his 27th birthday just around the corner, is running out of time to claim an elusive French Open to add to his 12 Grand Slam titles.

"Roger is too good for that be a very important loss for him. For sure, it's not easy to lose a final of Grand Slam. I lost the final at Wimbledon and that was very tough."

Nadal had chances to break Federer in a nerve-tingling final set in last year's Wimbledon final.

Many believe that with solid practice under his belt at Queen's Club this week, the Mallorcan could go on to become the first Spaniard since Manuel Santana in 1966 to win the Wimbledon men's title.

"I'm not saying I'm getting close to him on grass. It's difficult to say that especially when I only work and play on grass for three weeks of the year," added Nadal.

"I need to go through the first rounds, and then you start realizing that you can play well."
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline Start da Game

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Yellowball any word on the Clay Monster. i still feel sick to my stomach. it just doesnt seem right.

one of the most prolific clay courter of our times and he exits one of the most presitigious clay events in the 1st round (technically 2nd since he had a bye in the 1st).

i'm sure he's practicing for hamburg.  i don't think he has a choice but to go there and defend his points.   

right. it may not be about the points now. his preparation for Roland Garros is far from complete. he really needs to win the title in Hamburg and escape from there injury free.
now that's negative from u. the word 'escape' is just not associated with rafa on clay. our king ll return with 'heads' from hamburg. mark my words.
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline conchita

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Rafa Races to Fourth Straight Roland Garros Title   
atp.com

ATP World No. 2 Rafael Nadal captured his fourth straight Roland Garros crown on Sunday with a 6-1, 6-3, 6-0 victory over No. 1 Roger Federer in Paris. The score line reflected the second most one-sided Roland Garros final in the Open Era after the 1977 final, where Guillermo Vilas defeated Brian Gottfried for the loss of just three games.

Nadal becomes just the second player after Swede Bjorn Borg (1978-81) to win four consecutive Roland Garros titles since the event went international in 1925. The achievement also sees him join Federer, Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only players to have won at least four consecutive titles at a Grand Slam in the Open Era.

The 22-year-old Nadal joins Ilie Nastase (1973) and Bjorn Borg (1978, 1980) as just the third player in the Open Era to win the Roland Garros title without dropping a set, and the fifth player to do so at any Grand Slam in the Open Era.

The Spaniard now extends his unbeaten run at Roland Garros to 28-0 and his record in best-of-five set matches on clay to 41-0. He first captured the title on his debut in 2005 (d. Puerta), becoming the first player since Mats Wilander in 1982 to win the event on his first visit. He then won his second and third titles in 2006 and 2007 with victories over Federer.

The Manacor resident has raced through to his fourth title dropping just 41 games. While losing just four games in the final, Nadal was even more devastating in his quarterfinal victory over compatriot Nicolas Almagro, conceding just three games to make it the most one-sided quarterfinal at Roland Garros in the Open Era.

"I think he's played a terrific tournament," said Federer. "He's dominated everybody he played these last two weeks. I didn't come real close today so it's disappointing, because I really thought I was playing well the last few weeks and months."

After contesting closely fought battles in the finals of ATP Masters Series events in Monte Carlo and Hamburg in the lead up to Roland Garros, much was expected when Roger Federer stepped up to face Rafael Nadal in their 17th career meeting. However, in just the second time in the Open Era that the same two players have contested the same Grand Slam final for three consecutive years, the match proved to be the most one-sided encounter between the pair.

Nadal, who for the fourth year had already won three clay court court events prior to arriving in Roland Garros, enjoyed the better start in the match. He broke Federer in the first game courtesy of one of an eventual 49 unforced errors from the Swiss’ racquet. From there, Nadal did not look back and went on to break Federer for a second time with an accurate backhand pass cross court, one of many that would trouble Federer throughout the match. The 26-year-old Federer was unable to claw his way back and surrendered his serve for the third time at 1-5 to concede the set 6-1 as he drifted a forehand volley long.

The second set looked to be going in the same fashion as Nadal capitalized on the Swiss’ many unforced errors to go up an early break. However, Federer immediately hit back, finding some inspiration with an angled backhand to earn himself two break points and he was able to convert as Nadal netted a forehand. With the Parisian crowd urging him on, Federer had a chance to gain a key break through when presented with a break point chance in the seventh game. However a well-worked point from Nadal moved Federer from side-to-side before he placed a drop shot that Federer could only return in the net.

Having secured his own serve, Nadal immediately went after Federer’s. The Swiss No. 1 managed to fend off three break points against him, but on the fourth another backhand pass from Nadal was just out of Federer’s reach and he dropped serve to trail 3-5. Nadal was quick to extend his lead, closing out the set 6-3 as Federer returned serve long.

The third set lasted just 27 minutes as Nadal broke serve three times to secure the match victory after just 1 hr., 48 min., and hand Federer his first bagel set since June 1999, as Federer fired a forehand long prompting muted celebrations from Nadal after the comfortable win.

"I didn't expect a match like this," said Nadal. "But I think I played an almost perfect match. Roger made more mistakes than usual and I played more aggressively than usual."

This is the fewest number of games that Federer has won in 173 Grand Slam matches, his previous lowest was seven games against Andre Agassi (l. 6-1, 6-2, 6-4) in the fourth round at the 2001 US Open. It is also the fewest games he has won in the 372 matches since he has been at No. 1 in the South African Airways ATP Rankings, going back to February 2004.

"I mean, key for me is the way Rafa played," said Federer. "I mean, no doubt he played excellently. He hardly made any unforced errors, and when he's on the attack, he's lethal. To come up with a performance like this under pressure shows what a great champion he is."

Federer, who won his 54th ATP title and first of the year in Estoril in April (d. Davydenko), was bidding to capture the one Grand Slam title to still elude him and earn a career Grand Slam. The last player to win all four Grand Slam titles was American Andre Agassi, who captured Roland Garros in 1999.

Federer is the only the third player in the history of the sport, together with Ken Rosewall and Rod Laver, to reach the final at least three times in all four Grand Slam tournaments.

The Swiss, who has amassed 12 Grand Slam titles with five Wimbledons, four US Opens and three titles at the Australian Open, was looking to move to within one title of leveling Pete Sampras’ record haul of 14 titles. Federer now slips to a 12-3 record in Grand Slam finals, all three of his losses coming to Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros and falls just one match win short of claiming his 150th Grand Slam victory (149-23).

The Swiss becomes just the second player after Jaroslav Drobny since 1925 to lose his first three Roland Garros finals. Having lost the finals in 1946, 1948 and 1950, Drobny did go on to capture two Roland Garros titles in 1951 and 1952.

Nadal now collects €1,000,000 in prize money and 1000 South African Airways ATP Ranking points, while Federer receives €530,000 and 700 points.
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

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Rafa starts the grass season tomorrow at Queens, doubles match with Marinano Hood against Gonzo/Lapennti!!
Vamos Rafa!! 
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

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THE POWE AND THE PASSION     
By JOEL DRUCKER

Intensity, passion brute strength and extreme fitness make Rafael Nadal one of the most intimidating warriors tennis has ever seen. A fourth consecutive Roland Garros title in Paris in June would strengthen his claim to the title of greatest clay court player in history.

The late Arthur Ashe used the word "snap" to describe the exceptional urgency - an arresting, commanding swagger - certain players imposed on the game. Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker and Steffi Graf were among those at the top of Ashe's list. And then there is Rafael Nadal…

Even off the court, there's a bounce to his step, a heightened alertness radiating not just through Nadal's body, but even in his eyes, which are at once narrow and welcoming. Eyes that are on guard but always engaged as he jokes with friends, greets the many acquaintances that comprise the pro circuit and tosses off kindly winks to those he recognizes but can't quite recall by name.

In his press conferences, when the wear and tear of his latest match is thick in his body and mind, Nadal in conversation is often self-effacing and humble when speaking about his tennis. On the verge of earning a record fourth straight title at Masters Series Monte-Carlo in April, Nadal demonstrated the genuine humility you'd expect from a young man who still occupies the same apartment building as his family.

Yet once Nadal steps on the court, he transforms. From the minute he enters the arena - and that metaphor is exceptionally fitting for Nadal given the matador-like qualities of a Spaniard who excels on clay - his focus is total, his feet bouncing, his eyes sharply on the target.

Occasionally there have been champions who cast tennis in a utopian light. Roger Federer, Pete Sampras and Rod Laver struck the ball with such brilliance that the presence of an opponent was often a non-factor. But at heart, tennis is an interactive game, less an art form and more a battle. "It's a game of errors," says Federer's current coach, Jose Higueras, "and your job is to force them out of your opponent." The history of tennis is filled with attrition-based warriors who grind opponents into physical fatigue and subsequent mental capitulation - from the days of Don Budge in the '30s, on to such recent greats as Connors, Bjorn Borg, Ivan Lendl, Jim Courier and Andre Agassi.

Nadal is the latest exemplar of this tradition. The premise of this playing style is relentless focus and a willingness to slowly tighten the noose as the point grows longer and longer - an urgency to conduct the point oppressively but no hurried need to end it. "I'll tell you," says Courier, "to beat this guy you better be ready to take some serious chances." In some cases, that can mean stretching Nadal wide to his forehand as a means of exposing his backhand. "But you better really get him out there or else he can rocket that shot," says ex-pro and longstanding coach Brad Gilbert. In earning three wins over Nadal, James Blake has often taken advantage of Nadal's second serve by launching massive returns in an effort to take immediate control of the point and rush the Spaniard out of his comfort zone.

The cornerstone of Nadal's game is his topspin forehand. ESPN analyst and Agassi's former coach Darren Cahill says "it's chasing you, pushing you with all that work he has on it. The ball ends up playing you."

The combination of Nadal's whipping forehand and flat, forceful backhand is aided by his off-the-charts court coverage, the problems posed by being left-handed (though a righty in all other activities) and, most of all, his sheer love of the competitive cauldron. Says Gilbert, "What I love best about Nadal is his body language. Most times in tennis you look at the court and you can tell by a guy's body language what's the score. Not with Nadal. His competitive nature is great."

While it's impossible to tell if people are born with that kind of spirit, family ties have played a major role in Nadal's ascent. One uncle, Miguel Angel, was a top soccer player with FC Barcelona and Real Madrid, whose career showed young Rafa how much intensity it would take to be a world-class athlete. Even more significant was another uncle, Toni Nadal. If not quite good enough to be an ATP pro, Toni was an accomplished player who handed Rafa a racquet at age four. To say the boy took to the sport was an understatement. Growing up on the tiny island of Mallorca, Nadal rapidly lived and breathed tennis.

In many ways, Nadal's decision to hone his game in Mallorca and decline the chance to train at a national academy further boosted his confidence. Some players need to be surrounded by other coaches and players in order to remain disciplined. But there was never any doubt of young Rafa's drive - an ambition that caught the attention of a fellow Mallorcan, Carlos Moya.

"A few years ago I asked him if he would like to have a career like mine," Moya told the Spanish publication, Metropolitan. "He looked at me with the sincerity that you usually find in small children and said, quite seriously, that he aspired to more. And, I knew that he would be a better player than me."

It also proved oddly beneficial to Nadal that he missed two French Opens early in his career due to injuries. Instead, by the time he made his Roland Garros debut in 2005 he had built an impressive head of steam, first by beating Andy Roddick in the 2004 Davis Cup final and then by earning five clay court titles in the lead up to Roland Garros. He stepped up promptly at the 2005 French Open, becoming the first man to win the title on debut since Mats Wilander in 1982.

Since then just about every time Nadal steps on a clay court he seems to make history. Most notable, of course, is his magnificent 21-0 record at Roland Garros. This year he's aiming to match Borg's mark of four straight French Open titles. Says Nadal, "This is the tournament that I've played with the greatest happiness and joy in all my life."

So just how good is Nadal as a clay court player? There are many ways to examine his prowess. On the one hand, title-wise he's equal with Wilander and Lendl as three-time winners in Paris - and only half as successful as Borg, who won an astounding six French Open titles. Like Nadal, Wilander and Lendl, Nadal has won his share of events in Monte-Carlo, Rome and other notable clay court venues. Heading into the 2008 Roland Garros Nadal had won 108 of his past 110 matches on clay.

Yet another factor is that Nadal is playing in the most clay-skilled era in tennis history. Great as Borg was on clay, he was a true revolutionary, the first player ever to so heavily whip the ball with topspin on both sides - in large part the prototype of contemporary tennis. Borg presided over clay in an era when many of his peers had one-handed slice backhands and were hardly able to match his proficiency or consistency from the baseline.

Ditto, but to a lesser degree, for Wilander and Lendl. Playing styles then were still varied. Many net rushers tried to ply their skills on clay, which from time to time made it easier for skilled baseliners such as Wilander and Lendl to earn clay court victories. But Nadal is playing in a time when his brand of grinding baseline play is the model on just about all surfaces. In other words, he faces versions of himself - albeit of lesser skill - in just about every round he plays.

Add that all up and the thinking here is that Nadal is currently the second-best clay court player in tennis history. After all, regardless of the competition, Borg's six French Open titles represent a massive feat. Should Nadal win more titles at Roland Garros, though, he will likely be regarded as the finest clay courter of all time.

But the Spaniard wants to prove himself a man for all surfaces and make a mark not just in Paris but also in New York, Melbourne and London. The past two years at Wimbledon he's come one match short of equaling Borg's Paris-London double victories. Earlier this year he reached his first Australian Open semifinal.

And yet, though he'll turn a mere 22 on June 3, it's uncertain if Nadal's game lends itself to longevity. His technique is not particularly efficient in the manner of Federer, Agassi and Connors. Over the years little injuries have cropped up, ranging from a serious foot injury in 2005 to a major blister that surfaced during Masters Series Rome in May. So heavily does Nadal throw himself into pursuing victory at Roland Garros that he's often battle-scarred and weary during the second half of the year. Consider: In 2005, 2006 and 2007, Nadal earned a combined 16 tournament titles by the end of June. But while he earned five titles in the second half of '05, over the concluding half of the last two years he's won but one.

The marriage of Nadal's supreme will with his labor-intensive skill figures to be telling. For now, though, it's best to savor all he brings to tennis. Says Gilbert, "He's in the trenches on every point." If for opponents that spells misery, for fans it's made Nadal one of the sport's most popular players. No other player inspires so much chanting everywhere from the Internet to the stands of his matches. As those aficionados are fond of saying, Vamos Rafa. 
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

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Santana has always said that he didnt want to die without watching another spaniard winning at SW19!
Manolo has been waiting for 41 years!! he is desperated to see Rafa winning at Wimby!
Conchita Martinez is the color commentator of all the matches, she is wonderful, better commentating than ASV!
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.