Poll

How do you hit passing shots?

Favor cross court most often
Favor down the line most often
Right at the player or lob most often
Favor one of the above more than others (explain)
I equally mix it up because I am a tennis God

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Offline Tennis4you

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Re: Passing shots poll
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2008, 03:38:45 PM »

Well, ideally you want to play the percentages. But I'd be lying if I said I didn't play the low percentage shot from time to time. I call it my Nadal moments. :rofl_2: It just feels so good when it lands in. :))

I talk a good game, but I don't play smart tennis, and I don't play percentages well in singles. I don't know my limitations anymore, so I'm always trying to hit shots I just can't hit anymore.

Is it because you don't play singles much these days? I don't play much doubles at all. When I do, I find it somewhat hard to adjust to, especially when playing against a very good team. I played some doubles earlier this year, but I felt like my teammate carried me really. I have a pretty good serve and good volley skills but for some reason I'm just not a good doubles player.

Volleys are about the only thing I have left that I feel confident in. My volley stroke is very simple and I think I've always had good hands so it's almost natural. I'm tall and used to have a good serve, and overhead. The serve is average now, and the overhead is poor,  I don't get lobbed often, and I'm pretty quick about the net. Doubles takes advantage of my natural aggressiveness on the court. I can attack knowing I don't have as much court to cover.
I have never played singles much. In college I played about 60/40 singles/doubles. After college it was about 30/70 singles/doubles. Now when I get on court at all, it's nealry always doubles. When I did play singles, it was drilling or just knocking the ball around, sometimes plying 11s, but not playing many matches. So my singles experience may be that of a 3.0 player while my doubles experience may be at 5.0 (though the skills are not there anymore).

Yeah, I played a lot more doubles in college myself, coach wanted it that way. I think the biggest issue with doubles for me is my style of play. I like to work the point with the intention of grinding my opponent down. So it's hard for me to abandon that mentality when playing doubles because it's my natural play style. But hey, right about now I wish I could play period, doubles, singles, whatever. Not even being able to practice, makes things pretty boring these days.

I hear ya on the mentality thing.  I am much more comfortable playing singles.  I like to work the point to, differently that doubles allows of course.  I was telling OSU this the other day, but I never feel rushed in singles and always feel rushed in doubles.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Offline Pacer

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Re: Passing shots poll
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2008, 01:10:00 AM »

Well, ideally you want to play the percentages. But I'd be lying if I said I didn't play the low percentage shot from time to time. I call it my Nadal moments. :rofl_2: It just feels so good when it lands in. :))

I talk a good game, but I don't play smart tennis, and I don't play percentages well in singles. I don't know my limitations anymore, so I'm always trying to hit shots I just can't hit anymore.

Is it because you don't play singles much these days? I don't play much doubles at all. When I do, I find it somewhat hard to adjust to, especially when playing against a very good team. I played some doubles earlier this year, but I felt like my teammate carried me really. I have a pretty good serve and good volley skills but for some reason I'm just not a good doubles player.

Volleys are about the only thing I have left that I feel confident in. My volley stroke is very simple and I think I've always had good hands so it's almost natural. I'm tall and used to have a good serve, and overhead. The serve is average now, and the overhead is poor,  I don't get lobbed often, and I'm pretty quick about the net. Doubles takes advantage of my natural aggressiveness on the court. I can attack knowing I don't have as much court to cover.
I have never played singles much. In college I played about 60/40 singles/doubles. After college it was about 30/70 singles/doubles. Now when I get on court at all, it's nealry always doubles. When I did play singles, it was drilling or just knocking the ball around, sometimes plying 11s, but not playing many matches. So my singles experience may be that of a 3.0 player while my doubles experience may be at 5.0 (though the skills are not there anymore).

Yeah, I played a lot more doubles in college myself, coach wanted it that way. I think the biggest issue with doubles for me is my style of play. I like to work the point with the intention of grinding my opponent down. So it's hard for me to abandon that mentality when playing doubles because it's my natural play style. But hey, right about now I wish I could play period, doubles, singles, whatever. Not even being able to practice, makes things pretty boring these days.

I hear ya on the mentality thing.  I am much more comfortable playing singles.  I like to work the point to, differently that doubles allows of course.  I was telling OSU this the other day, but I never feel rushed in singles and always feel rushed in doubles.

I think that has a lot to do with it. I feel too confined and rushed playing doubles. It's fun to play casually, but as far as competing in doubles, I've never been able adjust well or at least feel comfortable( I don't really like the teammate thing either). Doubles and singles are just two different games as far as strategies go. Singles gives me more opportunity to implement the kind of strategies that I prefer. I suppose as I get older, it will be much easier to transition into doubles. :Confused:
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Offline Tennis4you

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Re: Passing shots poll
« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2008, 07:15:58 AM »

Well, ideally you want to play the percentages. But I'd be lying if I said I didn't play the low percentage shot from time to time. I call it my Nadal moments. :rofl_2: It just feels so good when it lands in. :))

I talk a good game, but I don't play smart tennis, and I don't play percentages well in singles. I don't know my limitations anymore, so I'm always trying to hit shots I just can't hit anymore.

Is it because you don't play singles much these days? I don't play much doubles at all. When I do, I find it somewhat hard to adjust to, especially when playing against a very good team. I played some doubles earlier this year, but I felt like my teammate carried me really. I have a pretty good serve and good volley skills but for some reason I'm just not a good doubles player.

Volleys are about the only thing I have left that I feel confident in. My volley stroke is very simple and I think I've always had good hands so it's almost natural. I'm tall and used to have a good serve, and overhead. The serve is average now, and the overhead is poor,  I don't get lobbed often, and I'm pretty quick about the net. Doubles takes advantage of my natural aggressiveness on the court. I can attack knowing I don't have as much court to cover.
I have never played singles much. In college I played about 60/40 singles/doubles. After college it was about 30/70 singles/doubles. Now when I get on court at all, it's nealry always doubles. When I did play singles, it was drilling or just knocking the ball around, sometimes plying 11s, but not playing many matches. So my singles experience may be that of a 3.0 player while my doubles experience may be at 5.0 (though the skills are not there anymore).

Yeah, I played a lot more doubles in college myself, coach wanted it that way. I think the biggest issue with doubles for me is my style of play. I like to work the point with the intention of grinding my opponent down. So it's hard for me to abandon that mentality when playing doubles because it's my natural play style. But hey, right about now I wish I could play period, doubles, singles, whatever. Not even being able to practice, makes things pretty boring these days.

I hear ya on the mentality thing.  I am much more comfortable playing singles.  I like to work the point to, differently that doubles allows of course.  I was telling OSU this the other day, but I never feel rushed in singles and always feel rushed in doubles.

I think that has a lot to do with it. I feel too confined and rushed playing doubles. It's fun to play casually, but as far as competing in doubles, I've never been able adjust well or at least feel comfortable( I don't really like the teammate thing either). Doubles and singles are just two different games as far as strategies go. Singles gives me more opportunity to implement the kind of strategies that I prefer. I suppose as I get older, it will be much easier to transition into doubles. :Confused:

Yeah, sounds painfully familiar.  I do like the partner aspect though.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Offline djinni9

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Re: Passing shots poll
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2008, 01:41:56 AM »
kind of late to be replying  :) but my few cents.

-i personally think that the crosscourt against a net player is very risky. it takes a lot of effort to produce a perfect, winning passing shot, especially when on the run. if amount of topspin is insufficient the ball will either land in the net or go long, especially considering the shorter distance on the angled crosscourt shot. if not looking to put the ball away outright and force a weak volley, then maybe, but i still think there are better options.
-a good topspin lob - again, difficult when on the run or without preparation- is the better choice for the crosscourt.
-personally, my favorite is down the line. even when the opponent is covering that side, and the margin for error is low, i still find it so tempting to go for this shot. on the backhand side i prefer a low slice. if you actually have a choice between hitting these two (crosscourt vs down-the-line) shots then most likely you will be in a better position to hit down the line; i just think that it requires less preparation.
-hitting at or very near the opponent can be a very good tactic. but there is a risk; if the opponent net player has very good reflexes and can -like i can  :cool:- contort in a split second to get his racquet behind the ball, most likely you're screwed; you'll be stop-volleyed to death!
-one remedy for that last situation is to use as much spin as possible. a hard or medium-strength low slice can do wonders, it has done so for me so many times. it forces your opponent to hit in to the net, because they don't take into account the spin - and even if they did, it would still be a difficult shot when so close to the net (again, it must be hit very low). the downside of the slice is that YOU might hit the ball into the net.
-the alternative shot to the slice when hitting at the net player is the hard-hit topspin. unlike the flat shot, the massive spin will cause the ball to deflect unpredictably if the racquet face of the net player is not ideally aligned. also, by its nature the topspin ball will tend to be at a high point relative to the net player's racquet. both of these facts will work in your favor; you will either get a very weak return volley that you can put away or he will hit the ball out; a stop-volley or anything of that sort is out of the question on such high balls. the downside is that if your shot lacks heavy topspin or maxes out its spin too early and too short, the net player can smash it, angle it, drop-volley it away.
-obviously, as another poster stated, the best possible shot in any situation will of course depend on where you are on the court and where your opponent is.