Author Topic: 2009 OFFICIAL FRENCH OPEN THREAD - ATP  (Read 131029 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2009, 09:17:05 PM »
Location Paris (XVIe)
 France
Venue Stade Roland Garros
Surface Clay / Outdoors
Men's draw 128S / 128Q / 64D
Women's draw 128S / 96Q / 64D
Prize money € 15,264,500

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/index.html

The French Open (French: Les Internationaux de France de Roland Garros or Tournoi de Roland-Garros) is a major tennis tournament held over two weeks between mid-May and early June in Paris, France, at the Stade Roland Garros. It is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar and the premier clay court tennis tournament in the world. It is one of the most prestigious events in tennis,[1] and it has the widest worldwide broadcasting and audience of all events in this sport. Because of the slow playing surface and the five-set men's singles matches without a tiebreak in the final set, some say that the event is the most physically demanding tennis tournament in the world.

History
Officially named in French the Les Internationaux de France de Roland Garros or Tournoi de Roland-Garros (the "French Internationals of Roland Garros" or "Roland Garros Tournament" in English), the tournament is often referred to as the "French Open" and sometimes simply as "Roland Garros".

The event began as a national tournament in 1891 as the Championat de France International de Tennis. The first women's tournament was held in 1897. In 1912, the French tournament was held with a different surface (at the time all tennis played was lawn tennis), a red clay ("terre battue"), made up from the crushed wastes of red brick. The tournament was open only to tennis players who were licensed in France through 1924.

In 1925, the French Championships opened itself to international competitors with the event held on a grass surface alternately between the Racing Club de France and the Stade Francais.[6] After the Mousquetaires or Philadelphia Four (René Lacoste, Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet, and Jacques Brugnon) won the Davis Cup on American soil in 1927, the French decided to defend the cup in 1928 at a new tennis stadium at Porte d’Auteuil. The Stade de France had offered the tennis authorities three hectares of land with the condition that the new stadium must be named after the World War I pilot, Roland Garros. The new Stade de Roland Garros, and its Center Court, which was named Court Philippe Chatrier in 1988, hosted that Davis Cup challenge.

Suzanne Lenglen Court at Roland Garros.From 1945 through 1947, the French Championships were held after Wimbledon, making it the third Grand Slam event of the year.

In 1968, the French Championships became the first Grand Slam tournament to go open, allowing both amateurs and professionals to compete.[6]

Since 1981, new prizes have been presented Prix Orange (the most fair-play and the most press friendly player), Prix Citron (the player with the strongest character, personality) and Prix Bourgeon (the tennis player revelation of the year).

Another novelty, since 2006 the tournament has begun on a Sunday, featuring 12 singles matches played on the three main courts.

Additionally, on the eve of the tournament's opening, the traditional Benny Berthet exhibition day takes place, where the profits go to different charity associations.

In March 2007, it was announced that the event will provide equal prize money for both men and women in all rounds for the first time ever.[7]


Surface characteristics
 
Clay courts slow down the ball and produce a high bounce when compared to grass courts or hard courts. For this reason, clay courts take away some of the advantages of big serves, which makes it hard for serve based players to dominate on the surface. For example, Pete Sampras, a player known for his huge serve, and Roger Federer, a former World No. 1, have never won the French Open. Similarly, John McEnroe, Stefan Edberg, and Boris Becker, three classic serve-and-volley players, never won this tournament.

On the other hand, players whose games are more suited to slower surfaces, such as Björn Borg, Ivan Lendl, Rafael Nadal, and Mats Wilander, have found great success at this tournament. In the open era, the only male players who have won both the French Open and Wimbledon, played on faster grass courts, are Rod Laver, Bjorn Borg, Andre Agassi, and Rafael Nadal.


Champions
Men's Singles, winner of the Coupe des Mousquetaires
Women's Singles, winner of the Coupe Suzanne Lenglen
Men's Doubles, winners of the Coupe Jacques Brugnon
Women's Doubles, winners of the Coupe Simone Mathieu
Mixed Doubles, winners of the Coupe Marcel Bernard
The trophies are all made of pure silver with finely etched decorations on their side, each new singles winner gets his or her name written on the plate holding the trophy.

Winners receive a replica of the won trophy. Pure silver replicas of the trophies are fabricated and engraved for each winner by the Maison Mellerio, located in the Rue de la Paix, Paris.

Records
Record Era Player(s) Nos. Years
Men since 1891
Winner of most men's singles titles Before 1925:  Max Decugis 8 1903, 1904, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1912, 1913, 1914
1925-1967:  Henri Cochet 4 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932
After 1967:  Björn Borg 6 1974-75, 1978-81
Winner of most consecutive men's singles titles Before 1968: 
Max Decugis 3 1907-1909, 1912-14
Frank Parker 2 1948-49
Jaroslav Dorbny 2 1951-52
Tony Trabert 2 1954-55
Nicola Pietrangeli 2 1959-60
After 1967:  Björn Borg  4 1978-81
Rafael Nadal 4 2005-08
 
Winner of most men's doubles titles Before 1968:  Max Decugis 14 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1920
 Roy Emerson 6 1960, 1962 with Neale Fraser, 1961 with Rod Laver, 1963 with Manuel Santana, 1964 with Ken Fletcher, 1965 with Fred Stolle
After 1967:  Paul Haarhuis 3 1995, 1998 with Jacco Eltingh, 2002, Yevgeny Kafelnikov 3 1996-97 with Daniel Vacek, 2002 with Paul Haarhuis
Winner of most consecutive men's doubles titles Before 1968:  Max Decugis 13 1902-14
 Roy Emerson 6 1960-65
After 1967:  Gene Mayer 2 1978 with Hank Pfister, 1979 with Sandy Mayer, Yevgeny Kafelnikov &  Daniel Vacek 2 1996-97 Jonas Bjorkman &  Max Mirnyi 2 2005-06
 
Winner of most mixed doubles titles - Men Before 1968:  Max Decugis 7 1904, 1905, 1906, 1908, 1909, 1914 and 1920 with Suzanne Lenglen
After 1967:  Jean-Claude Barclay 4 1968, 1971, 1973 with Francoise Durr
Winner of most titles (total: singles, doubles, mixed) - men Before 1968:  Max Decugis 29 1902-1920 (8 singles, 14 doubles, 7 mixed)
After 1967:  Bjorn Borg 6 1974-81 (6 singles)
 
Miscellaneous
Youngest winner Men:  Michael Chang 17 years and 3 months
Unseeded Winners Men:  Marcel Bernard 1946
Mats Wilander 1982
Gustavo Kuerten 2007
Gaston Gaudio 2004

« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 06:14:14 PM by conchita »
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #41 on: May 17, 2009, 09:31:28 PM »
List of French Open Men's Singles champions and finalists

This is a comprehensive list of all final results and champions for the men's singles event of the French Open tennis tournament.

Amateur Championships of France (1891-1924)
For these years, very few foreign players entered and no officially professional players were permitted.
Year Champion Runner-up Score
1891  H. Briggs a British resident of Paris  P. Baigneres 
1892  Jean Schopfer  Fassitt 
1893  L. Riboulet  Jean Schopfer 
1894  André Vacherot  Gérard Brosselin 
1895  André Vacherot  L. Riboulet 
1896  André Vacherot  Gérard Brosselin 6-1, 7-5
1897  Paul Aymé  Francky Wardan 4-6, 6-4, 6-2
1898  Paul Aymé  Paul Lebreton 
1899  Paul Aymé  Paul Lebreton 
1900  Paul Aymé  Alain Prévost 
1901  André Vacherot  Paul Lebreton 
1902  Marcel Vacherot  Max Décugis 6-4, 6-2
1903  Max Décugis  André Vacherot 
1904  Max Décugis  André Vacherot 6-1, 9-7, 6-8, 6-1
1905  Maurice Germot  André Vacherot 
1906  Maurice Germot  Max Décugis 
1907  Max Décugis  Robert Wallet 
1908  Max Décugis  Maurice Germot 
1909  Max Décugis  Maurice Germot 
1910  Maurice Germot  François Blanchy 
1911  André Gobert  Maurice Germot 
1912  Max Décugis  André Gobert 
1913  Max Décugis  Georges Gault 
1914  Max Décugis  Jean Samazeuilh 3-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4
1915 no competition due to World War I
1916 no competition due to World War I
1917 no competition due to World War I
1918 no competition due to World War I
1919 no competition due to World War I
1920  André Gobert  Max Décugis 6-3, 3-6, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3
1921  Jean Samazeuilh  André Gobert 6-3, 6-3, 2-6, 7-5
1922  Henri Cochet  Jean Samazeuilh 8-6, 6-3, 7-5
1923  François Blanchy  Max Décugis 1-6, 6-2, 6-0, 6-2
1924  Jean Borotra  René Lacoste 7-5, 6-4, 0-6, 5-7, 6-2


Amateur International Championships of France ("French amateur") (1925-1967)
For these years the tournament was open to foreign players but still closed to officially professional players.
Beginning with 1928 it was held at Roland Garros.
Year Champion Runner-up Score
1925  René Lacoste  Jean Borotra 7-5, 6-1, 6-4
1926  Henri Cochet  René Lacoste 6-2, 6-4, 6-3
1927  René Lacoste  Bill Tilden 6-4, 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 11-9
1928  Henri Cochet  René Lacoste 5-7, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3
1929  René Lacoste  Jean Borotra 6-3, 2-6, 6-0, 2-6, 8-6
1930  Henri Cochet  Bill Tilden 3-6, 8-6, 6-3, 6-1
1931  Jean Borotra  Christian Boussus 2-6, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4
1932  Henri Cochet  Giorgio de Stefani 6-0, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3
1933  Jack Crawford  Henri Cochet 8-6, 6-1, 6-3
1934  Gottfried von Cramm  Jack Crawford 6-4, 7-9, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3
1935  Fred Perry  Gottfried von Cramm 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3
1936  Gottfried von Cramm  Fred Perry 6-0, 2-6, 6-2, 2-6, 6-0
1937  Henner Henkel  Henry Austin 6-1, 6-4, 6-3
1938  Don Budge  Roderik Menzel 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
1939  Don McNeill  Bobby Riggs 7-5, 6-0, 6-3
1940 no competition due to World War II
1941  Bernard Destremau   
1942  Bernard Destremau   
1943  Yvon Petra   
1944  Yvon Petra   
1945  Yvon Petra   
1946  Marcel Bernard  Jaroslav Drobný 3-6, 2-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3
1947  József Asbóth  Eric Sturgess 8-6, 7-5, 6-4
1948  Frank Parker  Jaroslav Drobný 6-4, 7-5, 5-7, 8-6
1949  Frank Parker  Budge Patty 6-3, 1-6, 6-1, 6-4
1950  Budge Patty  Jaroslav Drobný 6-1, 6-2, 3-6, 5-7, 7-5
1951  Jaroslav Drobný  Eric Sturgess 6-3, 6-3, 6-3
1952  Jaroslav Drobný  Frank Sedgman 6-2, 6-0, 3-6, 6-4
1953  Ken Rosewall  Vic Seixas 6-3, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2
1954  Tony Trabert  Art Larsen 6-4, 7-5, 6-1
1955  Tony Trabert  Sven Davidson 2-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2
1956  Lew Hoad  Sven Davidson 6-4, 8-6, 6-3
1957  Sven Davidson  Herbert Flam 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
1958  Mervyn Rose  Luis Ayala 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
1959  Nicola Pietrangeli  Ian Vermaak 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1
1960  Nicola Pietrangeli  Luis Ayala 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3
1961  Manuel Santana  Nicola Pietrangeli 4-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-0, 6-2
1962  Rod Laver  Roy Emerson 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 9-7, 6-2
1963  Roy Emerson  Pierre Darmon 3-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4
1964  Manuel Santana  Nicola Pietrangeli 6-3, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5
1965  Fred Stolle  Tony Roche 3-6, 6-0, 6-2, 6-3
1966  Tony Roche  Istvan Gulyas 6-1, 6-4, 7-5
1967  Roy Emerson  Tony Roche 6-1, 6-4, 2-6, 6-2

Professional International Championships of France ("French Pro") (1930-1968 and 1920-1932)
In 1930 the "Association Française des Professeurs de Tennis (AFPT)" held its first pro tournament, entitled "Championnat International de France Professionnel" (French Pro Championships) in 18-22 June 1930.
This tournament was reserved for the "official professional" players, and played on clay at Roland Garros (unless noted).

In 1953, from Saturday 21 November to Sunday 22 November, a 4-man (Sedgman winner, Gonzales runner-up, Segura 3rd and Budge 4th) professional tournament was held in Paris on indoor red cement at the Palais des Sports but there is no mention anywhere that this tournament was a French Pro : in particular in the January 1954 edition of Tennis de France, the french magazine, run by Philippe Chatrier (future president of the ILTF) who made the report of this tournament by interviewing Frank Sedgman, winner of the tournament. Joe McCauley included this tournament in his list of French Pro tournaments but he precised in his book "History of Professional Tennis": "May not have been considered at the time as an official French Pro". In January 1950 in the same site Pancho Segura defeated Jack Kramer.

Year Winner Runner-up Score
1930  Karel Koželuh  Albert Burke 
1931  Martin Plaa  Robert Ramillon 
1932  Robert Ramillon  Martin Plaa 
1933  not held
1934  Bill Tilden  Martin Plaa 
1935  Ellsworth Vines  Hans Nusslein 
1936  Henri Cochet  Robert Ramillon 
1937  Hans Nusslein  Henri Cochet 
1938  Hans Nusslein  Bill Tilden 6-0, 6-1, 6-2
1939  Don Budge  Ellsworth Vines 
1940-1955 not held
1956  Tony Trabert  Pancho Gonzales 
1957 not held
1958  Ken Rosewall  Lew Hoad 
1959  Tony Trabert  Frank Sedgman 
1960  Ken Rosewall  Lew Hoad 
1961  Ken Rosewall  Pancho Gonzales 
1962  Ken Rosewall  Andrés Gimeno 
1963[4]  Ken Rosewall  Rod Laver 6-8, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4
1964[4]  Ken Rosewall  Rod Laver 6-3, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3
1965[4]  Ken Rosewall  Rod Laver 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
1966[4]  Ken Rosewall  Rod Laver 6-3, 6-2, 14-12
1967[4]  Rod Laver  Andrés Gimeno 
1968  Rod Laver  John Newcombe 

Nevertheless before 1930 some tournaments were sometimes labelled "Professional Championships of France" : the Bristol Cup (held from 1920 to 1932), the most important pro tournament in the world in the 1920s, was sometimes referred as the French Pro  as well as the World Pro tournament held at Deauville in 1925. Therefore two different tournaments were both considered as French Pro Championships in 1925 (World Pro at Deauville and Bristol Cup at Cannes) and from 1930 to 1932 (Roland Garros and Bristol Cup at Beaulieu).

Date Event and city Winner Runner-up Score
1920 Bristol Cup, Cannes Romeo Acquarone   
1921 December Bristol Cup, Cannes John C. S. Rendall   
1922 19-23 December Bristol Cup, Menton  John C. S. Rendall  J. Negro 6-1, 0-6, 6-4, 6-2 (or 6-1, 0-6, 6-4, 6-1)
1923 December ?-20 Bristol Cup, Menton  John C. S. Rendall  J. Negro 6-2, 6-3, 7-5
1924 late December Bristol Cup, Cannes (Court Métropole)  Albert Burke  Ramon Najuch 7-5, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1
1925 August World Pro, Deauville  Karel Koželuh  Albert Burke 2nd 
1925 December ?-26 Bristol Cup, Cannes (Court Métropole)  Albert Burke  Ramon Najuch 0-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1
1926 13-16 December Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Albert Burke 3-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-0
No Bristol Cup in December 1927 : delayed to January 1928
1928 9-12 January Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Ramon Najuch 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
1929 January Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Albert Burke 6-3, 6-1, 6-0
1930 January Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Ramon Najuch 6-3, 6-3, 6-4 (or 6-3, 6-4, 6-4)
1931 10-17 January Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Albert Burke 6-3, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4
1932 5-10 January Bristol Cup, Menton  Karel Koželuh  Martin Plaa 6-1, 6-4, 1-6, 6-0

Open International Championships of France ("French Open") (since 1968)
Tournament open to amateurs and professionals.
Year Champion Runner-up Score
1968  Ken Rosewall  Rod Laver 6-3, 6-1, 2-6, 6-2
1969  Rod Laver  Ken Rosewall 6-4, 6-3, 6-4
1970 Jan Kodeš  Željko Franulović 6-2, 6-4, 6-0
1971  Jan Kodeš  Ilie Năstase 8-6, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5
1972  Andrés Gimeno  Patrick Proisy 4-6, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1
1973  Ilie Năstase  Niki Pilić 6-3, 6-3, 6-0
1974  Björn Borg  Manuel Orantes 2-6, 6-7(1), 6-0, 6-1, 6-1
1975  Björn Borg  Guillermo Vilas 6-2, 6-3, 6-4
1976  Adriano Panatta  Harold Solomon 6-1, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6(3)
1977  Guillermo Vilas  Brian Gottfried 6-0, 6-3, 6-0
1978  Björn Borg  Guillermo Vilas 6-1, 6-1, 6-3
1979  Björn Borg  Víctor Pecci 6-3, 6-1, 6-7(6), 6-4
1980  Björn Borg  Vitas Gerulaitis 6-4, 6-1, 6-2
1981  Björn Borg  Ivan Lendl 6-1, 4-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-1
1982  Mats Wilander  Guillermo Vilas 1-6, 7-6(6), 6-0, 6-4
1983  Yannick Noah  Mats Wilander 6-2, 7-5, 7-6(3)
1984  Ivan Lendl  John McEnroe 3-6, 2-6, 6-4, 7-5, 7-5
1985  Mats Wilander  Ivan Lendl 3-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2
1986  Ivan Lendl  Mikael Pernfors 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
1987  Ivan Lendl  Mats Wilander 7-5, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6(3)
1988  Mats Wilander  Henri Leconte 7-5, 6-2, 6-1
1989  Michael Chang  Stefan Edberg 6-1, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2
1990  Andrés Gómez  Andre Agassi 6-3, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4
1991  Jim Courier  Andre Agassi 3-6, 6-4, 2-6, 6-1, 6-4
1992  Jim Courier  Petr Korda 7-5 6-2 6-1
1993  Sergi Bruguera  Jim Courier 6-4, 2-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3
1994  Sergi Bruguera  Alberto Berasategui 6-3, 7-5, 2-6, 6-1
1995  Thomas Muster  Michael Chang 7-5, 6-2, 6-4
1996  Yevgeny Kafelnikov  Michael Stich 7-6(4), 7-5, 7-6(4)
1997  Gustavo Kuerten  Sergi Bruguera 6-3, 6-4, 6-2
1998  Carlos Moyà  Àlex Corretja 6-3, 7-5, 6-3
1999  Andre Agassi  Andrei Medvedev 1-6, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4
2000  Gustavo Kuerten  Magnus Norman 6-2, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6(6)
2001  Gustavo Kuerten  Àlex Corretja 6-7(3), 7-5, 6-2, 6-0
2002  Albert Costa  Juan Carlos Ferrero 6-1, 6-0, 4-6, 6-3
2003  Juan Carlos Ferrero  Martin Verkerk 6-1, 6-3, 6-2
2004  Gaston Gaudio  Guillermo Coria 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6
2005  Rafael Nadal  Mariano Puerta 6-7(6), 6-3, 6-1, 7-5
2006  Rafael Nadal  Roger Federer 1-6, 6-1, 6-4, 7-6(4)
2007  Rafael Nadal  Roger Federer 6-3, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4
2008  Rafael Nadal  Roger Federer 6-1, 6-3, 6-0


By country
Modern (Open Era)

Country #
 Spain 10
 Sweden 9
 Czechoslovakia 5
 United States 4
 Brazil 3
 Argentina 2
 Australia 2
 Russia 1
 Austria 1
 Ecuador 1
 France 1
 Italy 1
 Romania 1


(Entire History)
Country #
 France 41
 Australia 21
 United States 16
 Spain 12
 Sweden 10
 Czech Republic 6
 Germany 5
 Italy 3
 Brazil 3
 Argentina 2
 United Kingdom 2
 Egypt 2
 Russia 1
 Austria 1
 Ecuador 1
 Romania 1
 Hungary 1
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline Chris1987

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 40084
  • Gender: Male
  • Maria!!- Victoria!!- Elena V!!- Maria K!!
    • http://www.mariasharapova.com
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #42 on: May 18, 2009, 01:04:54 AM »
Chris, you have to take pictures of - you know who - for me, please?

 :innocent:

I'm responding just for the newbies here that don't really KNOW us:

I want pictures of:
Blake
Stan
Bolilli
Venus
Serena
Patty
Victoria
and...................... a guy named Federer

Blake?   :)~

Well, him too... :innocent:

You must mean Stan then... ;-()

I'll definitely be looking out for some of those players more than others Dallas, as you know Victoria and for sure Roger  :) I really hope this year I'll get to see Roger on court- that would be fantastic  :) I'm there 2nd week so Williams Sisters will be out by then  :)~
« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 01:10:41 AM by Chris1987 »
Career Grand Slam! 20 time English Champions!


Maria, Manchester United, Victoria, Elena V, Maria K, Rafa Nadal, LA Lakers, England Cricket

Maria Sharapova's number 1 Fan!

Offline Dallas

  • Global Moderator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 30585
  • Gender: Female
  • Federer-Wawrinka-Serena-Venus-Victoria
    • http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2007/01/monday_net_post.html#comment-27147061
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #43 on: May 18, 2009, 09:48:15 AM »
I'm there 2nd week so Williams Sisters will be out by then  :)~

Not so sure.  They usually come to play in the grand slams. ;-()

miro

  • Guest
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #44 on: May 18, 2009, 12:14:36 PM »
Location Paris (XVIe)
 France
Venue Stade Roland Garros
Surface Clay / Outdoors
Men's draw 128S / 128Q / 64D
Women's draw 128S / 96Q / 64D
Prize money € 15,264,500

The French Open (French: Les Internationaux de France de Roland Garros or Tournoi de Roland-Garros) is a major tennis tournament held over two weeks between mid-May and early June in Paris, France, at the Stade Roland Garros. It is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar and the premier clay court tennis tournament in the world. It is one of the most prestigious events in tennis,[1] and it has the widest worldwide broadcasting and audience of all events in this sport. Because of the slow playing surface and the five-set men's singles matches without a tiebreak in the final set, some say that the event is the most physically demanding tennis tournament in the world.

History
Officially named in French the Les Internationaux de France de Roland Garros or Tournoi de Roland-Garros (the "French Internationals of Roland Garros" or "Roland Garros Tournament" in English), the tournament is often referred to as the "French Open" and sometimes simply as "Roland Garros".

The event began as a national tournament in 1891 as the Championat de France International de Tennis. The first women's tournament was held in 1897. In 1912, the French tournament was held with a different surface (at the time all tennis played was lawn tennis), a red clay ("terre battue"), made up from the crushed wastes of red brick. The tournament was open only to tennis players who were licensed in France through 1924.

In 1925, the French Championships opened itself to international competitors with the event held on a grass surface alternately between the Racing Club de France and the Stade Francais.[6] After the Mousquetaires or Philadelphia Four (René Lacoste, Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet, and Jacques Brugnon) won the Davis Cup on American soil in 1927, the French decided to defend the cup in 1928 at a new tennis stadium at Porte d’Auteuil. The Stade de France had offered the tennis authorities three hectares of land with the condition that the new stadium must be named after the World War I pilot, Roland Garros. The new Stade de Roland Garros, and its Center Court, which was named Court Philippe Chatrier in 1988, hosted that Davis Cup challenge.

Suzanne Lenglen Court at Roland Garros.From 1945 through 1947, the French Championships were held after Wimbledon, making it the third Grand Slam event of the year.

In 1968, the French Championships became the first Grand Slam tournament to go open, allowing both amateurs and professionals to compete.[6]

Since 1981, new prizes have been presented Prix Orange (the most fair-play and the most press friendly player), Prix Citron (the player with the strongest character, personality) and Prix Bourgeon (the tennis player revelation of the year).

Another novelty, since 2006 the tournament has begun on a Sunday, featuring 12 singles matches played on the three main courts.

Additionally, on the eve of the tournament's opening, the traditional Benny Berthet exhibition day takes place, where the profits go to different charity associations.

In March 2007, it was announced that the event will provide equal prize money for both men and women in all rounds for the first time ever.[7]


Surface characteristics
 
Clay courts slow down the ball and produce a high bounce when compared to grass courts or hard courts. For this reason, clay courts take away some of the advantages of big serves, which makes it hard for serve based players to dominate on the surface. For example, Pete Sampras, a player known for his huge serve, and Roger Federer, a former World No. 1, have never won the French Open. Similarly, John McEnroe, Stefan Edberg, and Boris Becker, three classic serve-and-volley players, never won this tournament.

On the other hand, players whose games are more suited to slower surfaces, such as Björn Borg, Ivan Lendl, Rafael Nadal, and Mats Wilander, have found great success at this tournament. In the open era, the only male players who have won both the French Open and Wimbledon, played on faster grass courts, are Rod Laver, Bjorn Borg, Andre Agassi, and Rafael Nadal.


Champions
Men's Singles, winner of the Coupe des Mousquetaires
Women's Singles, winner of the Coupe Suzanne Lenglen
Men's Doubles, winners of the Coupe Jacques Brugnon
Women's Doubles, winners of the Coupe Simone Mathieu
Mixed Doubles, winners of the Coupe Marcel Bernard
The trophies are all made of pure silver with finely etched decorations on their side, each new singles winner gets his or her name written on the plate holding the trophy.

Winners receive a replica of the won trophy. Pure silver replicas of the trophies are fabricated and engraved for each winner by the Maison Mellerio, located in the Rue de la Paix, Paris.

Records
Record Era Player(s) Nos. Years
Men since 1891
Winner of most men's singles titles Before 1925:  Max Decugis 8 1903, 1904, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1912, 1913, 1914
1925-1967:  Henri Cochet 4 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932
After 1967:  Björn Borg 6 1974-75, 1978-81
Winner of most consecutive men's singles titles Before 1968: 
Max Decugis 3 1907-1909, 1912-14
Frank Parker 2 1948-49
Jaroslav Dorbny 2 1951-52
Tony Trabert 2 1954-55
Nicola Pietrangeli 2 1959-60
After 1967:  Björn Borg  4 1978-81
Rafael Nadal 4 2005-08
 
Winner of most men's doubles titles Before 1968:  Max Decugis 14 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1920
 Roy Emerson 6 1960, 1962 with Neale Fraser, 1961 with Rod Laver, 1963 with Manuel Santana, 1964 with Ken Fletcher, 1965 with Fred Stolle
After 1967:  Paul Haarhuis 3 1995, 1998 with Jacco Eltingh, 2002, Yevgeny Kafelnikov 3 1996-97 with Daniel Vacek, 2002 with Paul Haarhuis
Winner of most consecutive men's doubles titles Before 1968:  Max Decugis 13 1902-14
 Roy Emerson 6 1960-65
After 1967:  Gene Mayer 2 1978 with Hank Pfister, 1979 with Sandy Mayer, Yevgeny Kafelnikov &  Daniel Vacek 2 1996-97 Jonas Bjorkman &  Max Mirnyi 2 2005-06
 
Winner of most mixed doubles titles - Men Before 1968:  Max Decugis 7 1904, 1905, 1906, 1908, 1909, 1914 and 1920 with Suzanne Lenglen
After 1967:  Jean-Claude Barclay 4 1968, 1971, 1973 with Francoise Durr
Winner of most titles (total: singles, doubles, mixed) - men Before 1968:  Max Decugis 29 1902-1920 (8 singles, 14 doubles, 7 mixed)
After 1967:  Bjorn Borg 6 1974-81 (6 singles)
 
Miscellaneous
Youngest winner Men:  Michael Chang 17 years and 3 months
Unseeded Winners Men:  Marcel Bernard 1946
Mats Wilander 1982
Gustavo Kuerten 2007
Gaston Gaudio 2004



Is this really true? If I have to guess it would be Wimbledon.

Offline tennis08

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 984
  • Gender: Male
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #45 on: May 18, 2009, 12:40:56 PM »
It’s safe to say the two best players on clay behind Nadal are Nole and Roger.  Since Nadal and Roger will be on the opposite side of the draw, I don’t think neither of them(and their fans) want Nole to be on their side.

I have a feeling if Nole ends up in Rafa half again, some of his fans will say the organizers favors Roger and want to see him in the final again.  It’s all about money driven b/c Nadal/Roger final attracts the most viewers.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 01:00:58 PM by tennis08 »

Offline Dallas

  • Global Moderator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 30585
  • Gender: Female
  • Federer-Wawrinka-Serena-Venus-Victoria
    • http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2007/01/monday_net_post.html#comment-27147061
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #46 on: May 18, 2009, 01:28:08 PM »
It’s safe to say the two best players on clay behind Nadal are Nole and Roger.  Since Nadal and Roger will be on the opposite side of the draw, I don’t think neither of them(and their fans) want Nole to be on their side.

I have a feeling if Nole ends up in Rafa half again, some of his fans will say the organizers favors Roger and want to see him in the final again.  It’s all about money driven b/c Nadal/Roger final attracts the most viewers.

It will be interesting to see how the draw pairs out.  Someone on another board said Nole has been on Rafa's side too many times.  I said Nole had been ranked #3 all this time and if he has been on Nadal's side so many times, how ironic would it be that during this French Open, the #3 players was drawn to be on Roger's side.  Guess Nole can't help it that he's now #4 and may be on Rafa's side again?  Just wondering... But it's all speculations right now until the actual draw comes out.

All I can say is that past history says that the 2 players with the best chance of reaching the French Open final would be Nadal and Roger...based on history and past results.  Of course, anything can happen!  I can't worry about where Nole or Murray will fall.  I have to worry about Roger getting through his matches, one match at a time. ;-()

Offline tennis08

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 984
  • Gender: Male
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2009, 02:40:46 PM »
I think Nole in 2007 or before wouldn’t make any different if he was in Nadal or Roger’s draw b/c he wouldn’t of beaten them anyway.  However, in 2008 he was playing well and people question if he could of beat Roger in the semifinal instead of having to deal with Rafa.  If Nole is in Rafa’s half again this year, then Roger will avoid him twice, and arguably he can take out Roger. 

Offline TheEternalCowboy

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 2974
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2009, 02:48:19 PM »
It’s safe to say the two best players on clay behind Nadal are Nole and Roger.  Since Nadal and Roger will be on the opposite side of the draw, I don’t think neither of them(and their fans) want Nole to be on their side.

I have a feeling if Nole ends up in Rafa half again, some of his fans will say the organizers favors Roger and want to see him in the final again.  It’s all about money driven b/c Nadal/Roger final attracts the most viewers.

People were previously complaining that Murray was always on Nadal's side.  Regardless of how things pan out, fans of all players will find ample reasons to complain into the void of the internet, because they can. 

On that note, if Rainer Schüttler is on Federer's side I am going to be pissed. 

Offline tennis08

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 984
  • Gender: Male
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2009, 02:55:31 PM »
It’s safe to say the two best players on clay behind Nadal are Nole and Roger.  Since Nadal and Roger will be on the opposite side of the draw, I don’t think neither of them(and their fans) want Nole to be on their side.

I have a feeling if Nole ends up in Rafa half again, some of his fans will say the organizers favors Roger and want to see him in the final again.  It’s all about money driven b/c Nadal/Roger final attracts the most viewers.

People were previously complaining that Murray was always on Nadal's side.  Regardless of how things pan out, fans of all players will find ample reasons to complain into the void of the internet, because they can. 

On that note, if Rainer Schüttler is on Federer's side I am going to be pissed. 

Right!

It's a 50/50 chance for #3 or #4 player to fall into Rafa(#1) draw.  Luck plays part of the game.

I think Nole's fans will be pissed if Safin is in his draw at SW19.


Offline medwatt

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 795
  • Gender: Male
  • I am the most beautiful
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #50 on: May 18, 2009, 03:00:57 PM »
Is Roland Garros/French Open an ATP event? :confused1:
The world awaits no genius

Offline Tatiana

  • Tennis Addict
  • ****
  • Posts: 318
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #51 on: May 18, 2009, 05:16:40 PM »
You know what's going to look really funny and fishy? If Nole is in Rafa's half at the FO but then Murray is in Rafa's half at Wimbledon...  Since Nole is considered a bigger threat than Murray at the FO but for some reason Murray is considered the bigger threat at Wimbledon. People are going to start thinking tennis is as corrupt as football.....

Offline Dallas

  • Global Moderator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 30585
  • Gender: Female
  • Federer-Wawrinka-Serena-Venus-Victoria
    • http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2007/01/monday_net_post.html#comment-27147061
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #52 on: May 18, 2009, 05:26:40 PM »
You know what's going to look really funny and fishy? If Nole is in Rafa's half at the FO but then Murray is in Rafa's half at Wimbledon...  Since Nole is considered a bigger threat than Murray at the FO but for some reason Murray is considered the bigger threat at Wimbledon. People are going to start thinking tennis is as corrupt as football.....

Hey, it's a 50/50 shot.  Look how many times Ivo falls in Roger's half; or Rainer... as Babbs call it.  ALL the time :rofl_2: It's just the 'luck of the draw'.  I said earlier that it seems like the #3 seed has gotten in Nadal's half more..so the odds say the #4 seed will now fall in Nadal's half.  (but then... the #3 and #4 people just exchanged positions... so Djokovic still has a shot at falling in Nadal's half) :rofl_2:

But my philosophy is... to win a grand slam, you beat who you have to beat... whether it's #1, #3, #100... just take care of business... one match at a time. ;-()  So I don't care who is in Roger's half of the draw.  He needs to just take care of business one match at a time.

Offline tennis08

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 984
  • Gender: Male
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #53 on: May 18, 2009, 05:27:49 PM »
You know what's going to look really funny and fishy? If Nole is in Rafa's half at the FO but then Murray is in Rafa's half at Wimbledon...  Since Nole is considered a bigger threat than Murray at the FO but for some reason Murray is considered the bigger threat at Wimbledon. People are going to start thinking tennis is as corrupt as football.....

But 2008 AO champion Nole was in Roger’s half at 2009 AO.  Nole was more of a threat at 2008 SW19 than Murray, but he end up in Roger’s half.  He was also was more of a threat at the 2008 USO, and he was in Roger’s half. 

I think it’s about time for Nole to be in Nadal’s half, don’t you?

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: Roland Garros
« Reply #54 on: May 18, 2009, 06:23:33 PM »
what are your thoughts about the proposal for the development of Roland Garros?
Pam, can you give us details, new Court Central in another location 500 meters away from the current one, with a roof.
no time yet to see the project in links on internet, seems they need the approval of the city council.   


Everything (+ a video) is on this link:
http://www.fft.fr/filinfos/default.asp?ID=4933

The project was chosen 2 days ago:

- In the new complex, there will be 3 courts: one main court (with the roof) (14600 seats) and 2 annexes (1500 and 700 seats).
- We dont' know yet how we can go from the former complex to the new one...the idea of a tramway is contemplated...or maybe there will just be a "gate"...
-The roof can be opened in 5 minutes, and it is labelled high environmental quality (photovoltaic cells, etc.)  (they say...)
- The inclination of the grandstand will allow the sun to enlighten the court directly from 9 a.m to 19 a.m (so I suppose there won't be too much shadow...)

All of this is scheduled for 2012 (the new main court AND the 2 annexes will have a roof by 2012 normally)

But they first need to obtain the building construct.


And last information: the current central court (Philippe Chatrier) will have a roof in 2011.



I don't know if you learnt anything new...


I heard the news during the AO, the big critics at the time were about the new stadium breaking all the ambient-atmosphere at Roland Garros, like building the main stadium outside of the tennis center. it was obvious they need to upgrade the facilities, no changes in a decade. why go there, since they opened court A in 1997?? that leaves the USO as the complex who is not upgrading facilities, I also heard the cost of a roof on Ashe will be too expensive, so they could put a roof on Armstrong.



 In a few years time, the Roland Garros stadium will have taken on a whole new look, with a brand new complex featuring three courts designed on the Georges Hébert site between the Porte d'Auteuil and Porte Molitor.

The main court will have a sliding roof that can be put in place in five minutes and will have 14,600 seats. To the west, side panels will also be fitted to close off the court in the space of two minutes. The stands will be asymmetrical, with the one facing south and facing the court lengthways (which will have the most sunlight) being higher than the three others.

The roof meanwhile will be fitted with photovoltaic cells which, along with other features, will mean that the stadium is of a high environmental standard. The angle of the stands will enable sunlight to shine directly onto the court from 9 o'clock in the morning until 7 in the evening. A wide walk-way will encircle centre court.

At the north of the site, two outside courts (with 1,500 and 750 seats respectively) will be positioned alongside centre court. They will primarily be for practice and have a garden overlooking them which will be open to the public all year round while serving as a place for fans to meet during the tournament. "We want to include the Bois de Boulogne woodland as much as possible within Paris, up as far as the Boulevard Murat," Mimram explains.

Include the Bois de Boulogne

The entrances to this new centre for the French Open will be redesigned, as will those at the "historic" stadium some 450 metres away. With widened footpaths, the planting of trees and even the possibility of a tram being built along Boulevard Murat, the area around the Place de la Porte d'Auteuil will certainly be taking on a new look.

With the foundations of the building work being set very deep, the new complex on the Georges Hébert site will not alter the view of the local residents unfavourably. The sliding roof covering the main court will also act as a "horizontal noise-prevention wall", Mimram adds. The complex will also house offices, a state-of-the-art players' lounge, a press centre and ample reception areas, all spread across various levels.

"What I really liked about this project are the contours of the stadium which Marc Mimram himself penned," said Jean Gachassin, FFT president. "I also like the area of greenery which will provide a winter garden for the local residents."

Discussions will now be held between the FFT and Paris city hall regarding the renewal of the Roland Garros stadium rights and those for the Georges Hébert site, which is what will decide when the next stages – the granting of building permission and then the start of construction – can get under way.

"We were under real pressure to evolve and to expand, and this project has given us the kind of answers that we were looking for," added Gilbert Ysern, CEO of the FFT and tournament director of the French Open. "We will no doubt encounter a few difficulties along the way, but there is no way that an architectural project of this magnitude in Paris would be free of problems. The main thing is to face them head on and overcome them before we request a building permit from Paris city hall."
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline TheEternalCowboy

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 2974
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #55 on: May 18, 2009, 06:26:31 PM »
You know what's going to look really funny and fishy? If Nole is in Rafa's half at the FO but then Murray is in Rafa's half at Wimbledon...  Since Nole is considered a bigger threat than Murray at the FO but for some reason Murray is considered the bigger threat at Wimbledon. People are going to start thinking tennis is as corrupt as football.....

That's going to look as funny and fishy as flipping heads on a coin, and then flipping tails right after that. 
 

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #56 on: May 18, 2009, 06:27:43 PM »
QUALIFYING DRAW IS OUT!  :)

Fabio Fognini ITA [1] vs. Kyu-Tae Im KOR
Victor Estrella DOM vs. Mikhail Kukushkin KAZ
Giovanni Lapentti ECU vs. Benoît Paire FRA [WC]
Robert Smeets AUS vs. Michail Elgin RUS [23]

Leonardo Mayer ARG [2] vs. George Bastl SUI
Thiemo de Bakker NED vs. Marsel Ilhan TUR
Santiago Gonzalez MEX vs. Stéphane Robert FRA
Brydan Klein AUS vs. Kevin Anderson RSA [31]

Marcos Daniel BRA [3] vs. Prakash Amritraj IND
Ivan Dodig CRO vs. Caio Zampieri BRA
Ryler DeHeart USA vs. Alex Bogdanovic GBR
João Souza BRA vs. Somdev Devvarman IND [26]

Victor Crivoi ROU [4] vs. David Marrero ESP
Rajeev Ram USA vs. Julien Obry FRA [WC]
Ricardo Hocevar BRA vs. Tobias Kamke GER
Andre Miele BRA vs. Lukas Rosol CZE [30]

Guillermo Cañas ARG [5] vs. Paolo Lorenzi ITA
Daniel Muñoz-De la Nava ESP vs. Martin Alund ARG
Joseph Sirianni AUS vs. Martin Fischer AUT
Jonathan Dasnières de Véigy FRA [WC] vs. Ilija Bozoljac SRB [21]

Brian Dabul ARG [6] vs. Pablo Santos ESP
Grega Zemlja SLO vs. Sébastien de Chaunac FRA
Sergei Bubka Jr. UKR vs. Scoville Jenkins USA
Alejandro Falla COL vs. Daniel Brands GER [20]

Frank Dancevic CAN [7] vs. Jean-René Lisnard MON
Luka Gregorc SLO vs. Dick Norman BEL
Boris Pashanski SRB vs. Nicolas Mahut FRA
Niels Desein BEL vs. Lamine Ouahab ALG [24]

Flavio Cipolla ITA [8] vs. Dominik Meffert GER
Luis Horna PER vs. Pere Riba ESP
Julian Reister GER vs. Todd Widom USA
David Guez FRA [WC] vs. Santiago Giraldo COL [19]

Sergiy Stakhovsky UKR [9] vs. Rik de Voest RSA
Stéphane Bohli SUI vs. Ryan Sweeting USA
Alexander Flock GER vs. Adrian Ungur ROU
Peter Luczak AUS vs. Chris Guccione AUS [27]

Simon Greul GER [10] vs. Mathieu Rodrigues FRA [WC]
Dieter Kindlmann GER vs. Michael Lammer SUI
Karol Beck SVK vs. Michel Koning NED
Tomas Tenconi ITA vs. Pablo Cuevas URU [18]

Roko Karanusic CRO [11] vs. Ricardo Mello BRA
Peter Polansky CAN vs. Fernando Vicente ESP
Antonio Veic CRO vs. Marinko Matosevic AUS
Mariano Zabaleta ARG vs. Olivier Rochus BEL [22]

Michael Berrer GER [12] vs. Filippo Volandri ITA
Joshua Goodall GBR vs. Amer Delic USA
Simon Stadler GER vs. Franco Ferreiro BRA
Yuri Schukin KAZ vs. Jesse Huta Galung NED [29]

Thiago Alves BRA [13] vs. Jaroslav Pospisil CZE
Edouard Roger-Vasselin FRA vs. Adrian Cruciat ROU
Bruno Echagaray MEX vs. Björn Rehnquist SWE
Axel Michon FRA [WC] vs. Lukasz Kubot POL [25]

Santiago Ventura ESP [14] vs. Michael Russell USA
Marc López ESP vs. Tsung-Hua Yang TPE [WC]
Matthias Bachinger GER vs. Eric Prodon FRA
Brendan Evans USA vs. Mathieu Montcourt FRA [17]

Horacio Zeballos ARG [15] vs. Ruben Bemelmans BEL
Jiri Vanek CZE vs. Jonathan Eysseric FRA [WC]
Dominik Hrbaty SVK vs. Alessio Di Mauro ITA
Riccardo Ghedin ITA vs. Olivier Patience FRA [32]

Rui Machado POR [16] vs. Marco Crugnola ITA
Miguel Angel Lopez Jaen ESP vs. Giancarlo Petrazzuolo ITA
Thierry Ascione FRA [WC] vs. Juan-Pablo Brzezicki ARG
Sebastian Decoud ARG vs. Jesse Levine USA [28]

Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline medwatt

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 795
  • Gender: Male
  • I am the most beautiful
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #57 on: May 18, 2009, 06:34:27 PM »
Looks like Djokovic is causing a typhoon here. Where is he gonna be put? :whistle: That doesn't matter at all. Look, the same scenario occured last year. Djokovic was on the verge of beating Nadal at Hamburg and on edge of the number two ranking and he almost did it. Everyone said it was close and maybe the next time he'll beat him.
They were drawn together in Paris and we all expected a tough encounter like Hamburg. Instead Nadal won in straight. So lets forget where he's going to drop.

And guys here are underestimating Murray. Mind you there's only about 1000 points difference between Federer and Murray and Murray went out last year in the early stages so there's a lot of points he can collect.

Murray can even think of the number 1 spot. Yeah imagine Nadal loosing first round or more realisic he had to retire. He'll lose 2000 points bringing him to 12000 and also imagine Murray winning the French Open and gains 2000 points adding to his total to get 11000 points. So Murray starts big thinking.

Maybe all what I've written is rubbish. Sorry for taking your time. ;-()
« Last Edit: May 18, 2009, 06:44:20 PM by medwatt »
The world awaits no genius

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #58 on: May 18, 2009, 06:47:25 PM »
Qualifying Day 1: Tuesday, 19 May, OOP

Court 6 09:00 Start   

Sergiy Stakhovsky (UKR)[9] v.   Rik De Voest (RSA)
Riccardo Ghedin (ITA) v.   Olivier Patience (FRA)[32]
Matthias Bachinger (GER) v.   Eric Prodon (FRA)
Guillermo Canas (ARG)[5] v.   Paolo Lorenzi (ITA)
Leonardo Mayer (ARG)[2] v.   George Bastl (SUI)
Giovanni Lapentti (ECU) v.   Benoit Paire (FRA)
 
Court 7 09:00 Start   
Thierry Ascione (FRA) v.   Juan Pablo Brzezicki (ARG)
Edouard Roger-Vasselin (FRA) v.   Adrian Cruciat (ROU)
Mariano Zabaleta (ARG) v.   Olivier Rochus (BEL)[22]
Boris Pashanski (SRB) v.   Nicolas Mahut (FRA)
Santiago Gonzalez (MEX) v.   Stephane Robert (FRA)
Fabio Fognini (ITA)[1] v.   Kyu tae Im (KOR)
 
Court 8 09:00 Start   
Sebastian Decoud (ARG) v.   Jesse Levine (USA)[28]
Jiri Vanek (CZE) v.   Jonathan Eysseric (FRA)
Roko Karanusic (CRO)[11] v.   Ricardo Mello (BRA)
Frank Dancevic (CAN)[7] v.   Jean-Rene Lisnard (MON)
Victor Crivoi (ROU)[4] v.   David Marrero (ESP)
 
Court 9 09:00 Start   
Stephane Bohli (SUI) v.   Ryan Sweeting (USA)
Yuri Schukin (KAZ) v.   Jesse Huta Galung (NED)[29]
Peter Polansky (CAN) v.   Fernando Vicente (ESP)
Sergei Bubka (UKR) v.   Scoville Jenkins (USA)
Brydan Klein (AUS) v.   Kevin Anderson (RSA)[31]
 
Court 10 09:00 Start   
Rui Machado (POR)[16] v.   Marco Crugnola (ITA)
Horacio Zeballos (ARG)[15] v.   Ruben Bemelmans (BEL)
Antonio Veic (CRO) v.   Marinko Matosevic (AUS)
Jonathan Dasnieres De Veigy (FRA) v.   Ilia Bozoljac (SRB)[21]
Ryler Deheart (USA) v.   Alex Bogdanovic (GBR)
 
Court 11 09:00 Start   
Alexander Flock (GER) v.   Adrian Ungur (ROU) 
Joshua Goodall (GBR) v.   Amer Delic (USA)
Santiago Ventura (ESP)[14] v.   Michael Russell (USA)
Karol Beck (SVK)[33] v.   Pablo Santos (ESP)
Thiemo De Bakker (NED) v.   Marsel Ilhan (TUR)
 
Court 12 09:00 Start   
Dieter Kindlmann (GER) v.   Michael Lammer (SUI)
Simon Stadler (GER) v.   Franco Ferreiro (BRA)
Marc Lopez (ESP) v.   Tsung-Hua Yang (TPE)
Joseph Sirianni (AUS) v.   Martin Fischer (AUT)
Andre Miele (BRA) v.   Lukas Rosol (CZE)[30]

Court 14 09:00 Start   
Simon Greul (GER)[10] v.   Mathieu Rodrigues (FRA)
Michael Berrer (GER)[12] v.   Filippo Volandri (ITA)
David Guez (FRA) v.   Santiago Giraldo (COL)[19]
Alejandro Falla (COL) v.   Daniel Brands (GER)[20]
Marcos Daniel (BRA)[3] v.   Prakash Amritraj (IND)
Victor Estrella (DOM) v.   Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ)
 
Court 15 09:00 Start   
A Alternate (FRA) v.   Michel Koning (NED)
Thiago Alves (BRA)[13] v.   Jaroslav Pospisil (CZE)
Julian Reister (GER) v.   Todd Widom (USA)
Daniel Munoz-De La Nava (ESP) v.   Martin Alund (ARG)
Ricardo Hocevar (BRA) v.   Tobias Kamke (GER)

Court 16 09:00 Start
Miguel Angel Lopez Jaen (ESP) v.   Giancarlo Petrazzuolo (ITA)
Dominik Hrbaty (SVK) v.   Alessio Di Mauro (ITA)
Flavio Cipolla (ITA)[8] v.   Dominik Meffert (GER)
Luka Gregorc (SLO) v.   Dick Norman (BEL)
Joao Souza (BRA) v.   Somdev Devvarman (IND)[26]

Court 17 09:00 Start   
Peter Luczak (AUS) v.   Chris Guccione (AUS)[27]
Axel Michon (FRA) v.   Lukasz Kubot (POL)[25]
Brendan Evans (USA) v.   Mathieu Montcourt (FRA)[17]
Grega Zemlja (SLO) v.   Sebastien De Chaunac (FRA)
Rajeev Ram (USA) v.   Julien Obry (FRA)
Robert Smeets (AUS) v.   Michail Elgin (RUS)[23]
 
Court 18 09:00 Start   
Tomas Tenconi (ITA) v.   Pablo Cuevas (URU)[18]
Bruno Echagaray (MEX) v.   Bjorn Rehnquist (SWE)
Luis Horna (PER) v.   Pere Riba-Madrid (ESP)
Niels Desein (BEL) v.   Lamine Ouahab (ALG)[24]
Ivan Dodig (CRO) v.   Caio Zampieri (BRA)
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 14553
  • Gender: Female
Re: ATP - 2009 French Open: May 5 - May 31
« Reply #59 on: May 18, 2009, 07:21:20 PM »
it has the widest worldwide broadcasting and audience of all events in this sport.


Is this really true? If I have to guess it would be Wimbledon.

http://www.fft.fr/cms/GetDoc.asp?Type=5&ID=9616
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.