Author Topic: Young Generation  (Read 4294 times)

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Offline williamchung7

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2012, 03:49:58 PM »
It looks like Indian Wells, Ryan Harrison did better than Bernard Tomic. I remember both of them entered some ATP250 before went into Indian Wells.

Memphis round 32
Delray Beach QF after losing Inser

In other hand, Ryan Harrison
San Jose SF after losing Roanic
Memphis Round 16
« Last Edit: March 20, 2012, 07:42:09 PM by williamchung7 »

Offline Nole nº1

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2012, 04:17:47 PM »
Tomic and Harrison are good players.

Online Babblelot

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2012, 06:55:06 AM »
Hard to discount Nishikori because of his ranking, but I will anyway. I don't see it in his game and I suspect he's at his career high ranking.

Milos is the preeminent youngster.

Harrison, Dolgolopov, and Tomic are teases right now.

Dmitrov is making an ass of himself.
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2012, 08:56:25 AM »
I like the variety of Tomic.

I like the fact that Harrison isn't afraid to move into the forecourt.

I have the highest hopes for Raonic.
Surely this means he will fail miserably.
CONK da ball!!!

Offline Swish

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2012, 09:07:35 AM »
Raonic and Harrison.
 
It was very impressive how Harrison played Simon at his own pushing game at only 19 and gave him a real match.
Raonic will improve also, has the killer serve as his starting base.
 
These two I wouldn't call teasers and they are mature well beyond their age. I believe both will work on areas of their game that need it.
 
 

Offline Nole nº1

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2012, 09:22:10 AM »
Raonic and Harrison.
 
It was very impressive how Harrison played Simon at his own pushing game at only 19 and gave him a real match.
Raonic will improve also, has the killer serve as his starting base.
 
These two I wouldn't call teasers and they are mature well beyond their age. I believe both will work on areas of their game that need it.

They are good players.

Offline Swish

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2012, 10:37:59 AM »
Raonic and Harrison.
 
It was very impressive how Harrison played Simon at his own pushing game at only 19 and gave him a real match.
Raonic will improve also, has the killer serve as his starting base.
 
These two I wouldn't call teasers and they are mature well beyond their age. I believe both will work on areas of their game that need it.

They are good players.

They are getting better.
 
I like your posts!   :gleam:
 
 

Offline Nole nº1

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2012, 12:05:15 PM »
Raonic and Harrison.
 
It was very impressive how Harrison played Simon at his own pushing game at only 19 and gave him a real match.
Raonic will improve also, has the killer serve as his starting base.
 
These two I wouldn't call teasers and they are mature well beyond their age. I believe both will work on areas of their game that need it.

Thanks Swish.

They are good players.

They are getting better.
 
I like your posts!   :gleam:

Offline Nole nº1

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2012, 12:05:56 PM »
Raonic and Harrison.
 
It was very impressive how Harrison played Simon at his own pushing game at only 19 and gave him a real match.
Raonic will improve also, has the killer serve as his starting base.
 
These two I wouldn't call teasers and they are mature well beyond their age. I believe both will work on areas of their game that need it.

They are good players.

They are getting better.
 
I like your posts!   :gleam:

I like your posts too.

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2012, 08:18:15 PM »
2012 Sony Ericsson Open 2R R. Federer v R. Harrison part1


2012 Sony Ericsson Open 2R R. Federer v R. Harrison part2

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2012, 06:48:41 PM »


http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/lessons-learned-in-a-loss-to-federer/


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

March 25, 2012, 3:45 pm
Lessons Learned in a Loss to Federer
By CRAIG O'SHANNESSY
Before Roger Federer was Roger Federer, he was Ryan Harrison.

That’s to say that before he won 16 Grand Slam singles titles and $70 million in prize money, Federer was also a promising teenager who also lost to the best in the game on center court, like Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin.

Federer defeated Harrison 6-2, 7-6 (3), on Saturday in the second round of the Sony Ericsson in Key Biscayne, Fla., in a match that both players can ultimately feel good about.

For Federer, it’s all about adding another title, which would be a record 20th Masters Series championship.

For Harrison, a 19-year-old American, it’s all about not freaking out. It’s about gaining experience and composure and putting himself in situations where he can learn the art of winning big matches.

Harrison’s new coach, Grant Doyle, was not happy with how the match began but saw hope and promise with how it ended.

Doyle, an Australian former tour player based in Austin, Tex., worked with Harrison part time for most of 2011 and took over full-time duties last November.

“Ryan started the match hitting the ball too short, with too much spin on his forehand, and just waiting for Roger to miss,” Doyle said. “He has got to get himself in these situations more often to learn how to better handle it.”

Harrison was broken twice in the opening set, getting in only 48 percent of his first serves. When his first serve did go in, he won 10 of 12 points (83 percent), but missing so many gave him major exposure to his second serve, on which he won only 4 of 13 points (31 percent). Federer made 13 of 19 (68 percent) of his first serves, which meant he had to hit only six second serves, where he won four.

Lesson No. 1 — the first serve is the protector of the second serve.

Doyle also did not like how the patterns of play were developing, with Federer able to control the baseline rallies with his run-around forehand.

“In the first set, Roger was just standing in the ad court and teeing off,” Doyle said. “I had a feeling he would come out hot after Indian Wells. He was just camping in the backhand corner and dominating. His defense in the ad court is phenomenal as well.”

Doyle’s strategy to counter Federer’s strength was to get Harrison to run him hard to the deuce court, where his forehand is more likely to break down.

Lesson No. 2 — it is more important to hit the ball where you opponent does not want it than where you want to hit it.

Harrison settled down in the second set and was able to impose himself a little more in rallies, particularly in breaking Federer when he served for the match at 6-2, 5-3.

With the match in the balance, it was the Federer forehand that all of a sudden started spraying balls everywhere.

Harrison said he felt better at controlling his side of the court and was therefore able to apply more pressure to the other side.

“I started hitting my ball cleaner and with more authority,” he said. “My body language and energy got better, and that put some pressure on him. It was about keeping my cookies together when things were not going well.”

Lesson No. 3 — good things happen when your mind is not fighting itself.

What looked comfortable for Federer suddenly became a dogfight. “I felt like I had to win the match like three times at the end, so I was relieved to come through,” Federer said.

In the second set, Harrison made 52 percent of his first serves, which was a slight improvement from the first, but he got a lot tougher on his second-serve points, winning 13 of 21 (62 percent). Federer still won this battle, winning 9 of 13 points (69 percent) on his own second serve, but Harrison was now in the hunt.

Federer’s wayward forehand suddenly settled down and behaved in the tiebreaker. Doyle was happy with Harrison’s comeback and said he thought he was a little unlucky in the tiebreaker.

“Ryan played a good tiebreaker; Roger painted a couple of lines, and that’s why he is the best player in the world,” Doyle said. “At the end of the day it was close, but we have still got a long way to go.”

Doyle said he was working on making Harrison’s first serve a more consistent weapon, but pointed out that Harrison’s second serve is one of the best in the game. Harrison hits huge topspin on his second serve and in his mind thinks he swings harder at it than on his first serve.

“I hit my second serve with everything I have got and I just hope that it comes down,” Harrison said in a discussion we had in line at the pasta bar during the week.

“I learned to hit my second serve first, and my first serve is just a flatter version of it,” Harrison said.

Doyle is also working on flattening Harrison’s forehand, which produces big topspin but too often lands too short in the court and does not hurt his opponent.

“His backhand was also a weakness last year, but that is getting a lot stronger as well,” Doyle said.

Harrison is 9-8 this year and is ranked 73rd — not far off his career high of 65 in February.

Doyle is no stranger to developing American talent; he also directed Sam Querrey for more than five years during his ascent into the world’s top 50. He also works with a South African, Fritz Wolmarans.

Doyle said the goal for Harrison in 2012 is to break into the top 30. “If he can get there and be seeded in the big events, he won’t have to play an opponent like Federer in the second round,” Doyle said.

Lesson No. 4 — position yourself for success.

Matches like these are steppingstones for Harrison; the real value is not in winning the match but in developing and preparing his mind. The reality of tennis is that good losses, like this one, precede good wins. Before Harrison can beat a player like Federer, he must first lose to him.

This match was a physical test to see what works and what has to improve. It was also a mental test to see if Harrison can handle playing a legend of the game on center court.

Lesson No. 5 — in order to succeed, you must first fail. Be thirsty to learn from your opponent.

This match is an integral part of Doyle’s 2012 master plan, and the lessons learned from playing Federer will serve Harrison well as his goals and beliefs merge as the year unfolds.

Offline pawan89

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2012, 11:36:08 PM »
Look who just picked up their first top 10 win ... Dimitrov against Berdych. We'll see if he can put himself in this mix at the top of the young guns again. Harrison has made some noise in the US swing - mostly in impressive losses, Raonic has made some noise again with a title and finalist which still is the best showing. Tomic is missing in action and that leaves Dimitrov who has lost ranking but a strong showing this year could see him crack the top 30.


Offline monstertruck

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Re: Young Generation - Bernard Tomic & Ryan Harrison
« Reply #32 on: March 26, 2012, 04:35:24 AM »
Some nuggets in that interview William.
Sounds like Ryan's coach has a solid grasp of how to approach a tennis career.

I missed the Dimitrov v. Bercych match. :(
Was he 'on' or did the Birdman just fly away?
CONK da ball!!!

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2013, 11:56:47 PM »
I watched some of Hopman Cup matches, a 16 years Aussie stunned me. He has potential and hope his trainer can make good transformation for this young kid.

Tennis Hopman Cup 2013.Group B. Kokkinakis - Verdasco.XviD.RU (03.01.2012)
« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 11:58:46 PM by williamchung7 »

Offline Swish

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #34 on: January 05, 2013, 11:33:18 AM »
I like the fire Harrison has.
Carrying that to practice I don't know about but that's where champions are made.
 
 

Offline Orange Wombat

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2013, 12:03:08 PM »
To me Harrison is nothing but an angry hamster.  :whistle: Weak backhand, spinny forehand, terrible return serve, and a crazy temper also.
Goffin and Dimitrov are where it's at. Dimitrov may have had a bad attitude in the past (like middle-fingering and pushing umpire), but his game is incredibly smooth. He's like Federer, except more athletic.


Offline FreakyGOAT > CD

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2013, 12:35:05 PM »
To me Harrison is nothing but an angry hamster.  :whistle: Weak backhand, spinny forehand, terrible return serve, and a crazy temper also.
Goffin and Dimitrov are where it's at. Dimitrov may have had a bad attitude in the past (like middle-fingering and pushing umpire), but his game is incredibly smooth. He's like Federer, except more athletic.

I remember at Wimbledon ESPN interviewed Harrison, and he said he had been working on his mental game and stopped having mental breakdowns.

A few weeks later at the Olympics (at Wimbledon, of course) Harrison loses first round to Giraldo, and goes absolutely apes**t. If I recall correctly, once Giraldo had won he ran to the net to shake hands. Meanwhile, Harrison smashes his racquet into a billion pieces. I've never seen any player have a meltdown after their opponent had won.

To conclude this amazing anecdote, Harrison is a douche.
Oh Sheesh Y'all T'was A Dream

Offline Gawdblessya

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2013, 02:06:48 PM »
Nice thread, Williamchung. & some interesting comments here about the "promising" younger players. Some of them were playing Brisbane 2013, and here are some clips:

I like Goffin's game. Here he is against Ebden:

Matthew Ebden v David Goffin - Highlights Men's Singles Round 1: Brisbane International 2013


I wanted to see the Dimitrov -v- Raonic match, but couldn't & can't find a clip either. So here is Dimitrov against Baghdatis:

M. Baghdatis v G. Dimitrov - Highlights Men's Singles Semi Finals: Brisbane International 2013


Dolgopolov / Nishikori:

 
A. Dolgopolov v K. Nishikori - Highlights Men's Singles Quarter Finals: Brisbane International 2013


Harrison / Robredo:

Tommy Robredo v Ryan Harrison - Highlights Men's Singles Round 1: Brisbane International 2013


« Last Edit: January 06, 2013, 02:12:46 PM by Gawdblessya »
Carpe Diem

Offline tio_toni

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Re: Young Generation
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2013, 07:31:48 PM »
Tomic:  A headcase with WTA-esque power.

Dimitrov:  Fed copycat and mental midget/choker.

Raonic:  Big serve but limited game overall.

Nishikori:  More fragile than my 88 yr. old grandma.


Offline Tennis4you

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Young Generation
« Reply #39 on: January 06, 2013, 09:29:39 PM »
Tomic:  A headcase with WTA-esque power.

Dimitrov:  Fed copycat and mental midget/choker.

Raonic:  Big serve but limited game overall.

Nishikori:  More fragile than my 88 yr. old grandma.

Lol, the last one made me laugh out loud.  Tennis' future needs a boost.  We are spoiled rotten right now, and I wonder how that will affect tennis and its viewers in 5 years from now...
Good Luck on the Court!!!
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