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do you believe in God?

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huntingyou:

--- Quote from: jesse james on April 10, 2013, 05:05:01 PM ---
Ok, well i can't be authoritative about Cremo's stuff, as i've only limited knowledge of it, based on one book,  but what i think is that Cremoís credo falls short genuine science because he tends to gravitate towards complex contentious claims rather than building those claims upon simpler hypothosis. Itís apparoach ĎForbidden Archaeologyí also uses many outdated sources, which for someone claiming a work is pretty unacceptable.
  I think one of itís central thesis is an attempt to charaturise the scentific Ďesablishmentí as in some way conspiritorial, itís an approach shared by creationism too, and i guess it's this latter idea that your trying to shift the debate towards.
  Thatís not to say iím against the slaughtering of bloated, theoretical, sacred cows, but the de-bunking of such has to be
rigerous in an age of scepticism that sometimes borders cynicism.

Evolution isnít necessarily to be viewed as some far flung accademic understanding of the world, on the contrary,
hybridized organisms form the basis of our everyday existance-foods such as wheat, tomatoes etc are specifically selected
to be useful to us, and that selection process is easily observed, just as the owners of dogs select preferences in order to
create a new breed-you can see that biological process at work, but instead of being selected for suitability to a specific environment, instead itís human agancy which brings about the change.

As religion has been painted into a corner by modernity, creationism has tried to kick against that modernity by undermining it, rather than seeing-as catholicism for example did with Darwins revolution, scripture as alagorical (the catholic church was actually laid back about itís conclusion). The debate regarding creationism and evolution is over, it was over by the late 19th century.
  Itís a difficult dance that religion now has to do, it either refutes modernity and scientific rationalism, or allows scripture and belief to be seen as flexible, if it chooses the latter it can then bend with secular evidence. Either way it has problems, but the obvious problem with literalism (and it never is literal, but as a shorthand the idea is useful) is that youíre endlessly fighting battles that you simply canít win.

--- End quote ---

Not trying to shift the debate since we share similar opinions and observations when it comes to religion and overall understanding of today's ruthless elites struggle to advance their control. Last time we spoke about this was two years ago so maybe you don't remember.

The reason I asked you this question is because I'm genuinely interested on what what you have to say regarding establishment's theory on the beginning of the human race.

It's obvious at this point in time, that creationism as presented by organized religions fails at so many levels that's not even worth our time discussing. What grasp my attention is the search for explanation to many mysteries found in our distant past....especially, the early civilizations we have account of.

Going back to evolution, the model painted by scientists today is severely lacking as well. The link they try to accommodate from apes to the modern man doesn't stand the test of observation based on archaeological findings from all over the world and biological understanding of evolutionary anatomy. Even the great migration patterns are being revised as we speak thanks to DNA and mtDNA findings in different archaeological sites in North and South America for example.

So, modern scientists are now comfortable with admitting modern man presence 100,000 BC............the problem is some of the evidence points toward much earlier than that; think millions of years.

 
So how all this connect? Well, it seems to me the little recollection we have of early civilizations (those the catholic church didn't burn nor the secret societies has confiscated for themselves) gives us glimpse into the "god" question and the true nature of man. Their monolithic ruins that have survived through time and the ones we recently discover under bodies of water; certainly indicates knowledge and even technology that has been lost through millenniums.   

Just curious where you stand. You kind of dismissed conspiracies talk presented by cremo on his book hidden history. I mean, the guys has holes in his presentation sure; like you said earlier....don't throw the bath water with the baby in it. If there is really a global elite behind the scenes manipulating economies, policies and cultural movements; certainly their tentacles would extend into academia as well. Knowledge is power for those people...certainly any knowledge pertaining to our distant past would be against their interest to be reveal. I know christianity would agree  :innocent:        how many books does the Vatican hold in it's library? I would give anything to open those vaults...........


 

Emma:
I am going to post a few more quotes from Einstein. His quotes are so eloquent and self-explanatory that I donít believe they require any further explanation. I am glad we have him to look up to especially in time of need and not some intelligent fools whose only ability is to make things bigger, more complex and more violent Ė not to mention, create more confusion with their limited knowledge. Having said that, Iíve deliberately chosen these quotes to make my point. The second and the last quotes are very to the point as far as this discussion goes.   
 
- Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction.

- We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.

- God did not create evil. Just as darkness is the absence of light, evil is the absence of God.

- Creativity is intelligence having fun.

- Time is an illusion.

- When the solution is simple, God is answering.

- The only real valuable thing is intuition.

- I love Humanity but I hate humans.

- A true genius admits that he/she knows nothing.

- I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God. We see a universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws, but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations.
 
 

Swish:

--- Quote from: Emma on April 11, 2013, 08:23:15 AM ---I am going to post a few more quotes from Einstein. His quotes are so eloquent and self-explanatory that I don’t believe they require any further explanation. I am glad we have him to look up to especially in time of need and not some intelligent fools whose only ability is to make things bigger, more complex and more violent – not to mention, create more confusion with their limited knowledge. Having said that, I’ve deliberately chosen these quotes to make my point. The second and the last quotes are very to the point as far as this discussion goes.   
 
- Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction.

- We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.

- God did not create evil. Just as darkness is the absence of light, evil is the absence of God.

- Creativity is intelligence having fun.

- Time is an illusion.

- When the solution is simple, God is answering.

- The only real valuable thing is intuition.

- I love Humanity but I hate humans.

- A true genius admits that he/she knows nothing.

- I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God. We see a universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws, but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations.
 
 

--- End quote ---

Emma, don't worry about god or if he's this or if he's that.
 
Knowing who god is won't change anything, nothing to be proved and nothing can be proved I doubt.
 
Do something constructive.  :smartie:

themoneymaker99:
Best reason?
Because I breathe, that's why God exists!
It's not about religions or beliefs, it's just about that we all people are connected energies made by a Creator, whom we like to name God.
So Yes I believe in something that created us all, in this perfect alignment of the universe.

Start da Game:
einstein is overrated, emma.......a no. of myths created by west(particularly about india and hinduism) are being busted one by one.......time to wake up and embrace your roots, emma........forget einstein, forget others......just post something which came out of your region........

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