Author Topic: Senolytics: Anti-ageing Drugs and Nutrients  (Read 68 times)

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Offline Swish

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Senolytics: Anti-ageing Drugs and Nutrients
« on: March 28, 2015, 02:25:18 PM »
Looks good and the research is promising.  :king:
 
It's a combination of a drug and a over the counter nutrient (quercetin), each do their own part at removing senescent cells.
 
Quote
Published in the journal Aging Cell, the study reveals how the newly discovered drugs - named "senolytics" - successfully target and kill aging-related senescent cells without damaging other cells nearby.

Senescent cells are cells that stop dividing as we age. They accumulate in various body tissues, secreting proteins that cause damage to surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Senescent cells speed up the aging process and play a significant role in the development of age-related diseases.

 
 
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/290655.php
 
 
« Last Edit: March 28, 2015, 02:26:07 PM by Swish »

Offline Swish

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Re: Senolytics: Anti-ageing Drugs and Nutrients
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2015, 02:49:51 PM »
Another related article.  :cool:
 
 
 
Quercetin
 
Quercetin among new class of drugs for aging identified
 
March 25 2015. A new class of drugs labeled senolytics that may combat some of the factors associated with aging has been identified by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute. Senescent cells are those which have stopped dividing, and their accumulation has been associated with accelerated aging.
 
In an article published online on March 9, 2015 in Aging Cell, Paul Robbins, PhD, and colleagues document their discovery of increased expression of pro-survival networks in senescent cells. Compounds that target these networks, dubbed senolytics, include the drug dasatinib and the nutrient quercetin, which is found in fruits and vegetables, and is also available as a nutritional supplement. While dasatinib was found to reduce senescent human fat cell progenitors, quercetin showed a greater effect against senescent human endothelial cells and mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.  The combination of both compounds was shown to eliminate senescent mouse embryonic fibroblasts.
"We view this study as a big, first step toward developing treatments that can be given safely to patients to extend healthspan or to treat age-related diseases and disorders," stated Dr Robbins. "When senolytic agents, like the combination we identified, are used clinically, the results could be transformative."
 
"In animal models, the compounds improved cardiovascular function and exercise endurance, reduced osteoporosis and frailty, and extended healthspan," reported research team member Laura J. Niedernhofer. "Remarkably, in some cases, these drugs did so with only a single course of treatment."
 
"Senescence is involved in a number of diseases and pathologies so there could be any number of applications for these and similar compounds," Dr Robbins added. "Also, we anticipate that treatment with senolytic drugs to clear damaged cells would be infrequent, reducing the chance of side effects."
 
 

Offline FedFanForever

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Re: Senolytics: Anti-ageing Drugs and Nutrients
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2015, 09:15:34 PM »
I'm more interested in the 3-D printing of organs. That would be a revolutionary step in medicine and human longevity. Of course one thing you can't replace is the brain.
Then we will fight in the shade.