Author Topic: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!  (Read 634 times)

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Offline conchita

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Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« on: March 04, 2012, 11:44:56 AM »
on a personal note, this is probably the most important topic I have posted here at T4Y,
so happy, I can not post my comments yet!

Spanish tennis great Manuel Orantes to be inducted to the International Tennis Hall of Fame
NEWPORT, R.I., USA, February 23, 2012  — Manuel Orantes, a Spanish tennis star of the 1970s and 1980s, who defeated top top-seeded Jimmy Connors to capture the 1975 US Open title and played an instrumental role in Spain’s Davis Cup efforts for many years, will be inducted to the International Tennis Hall of Fame this year. Orantes is the third member of the Class of 2012 to be announced, and he is the only inductee in the Master Player Category. It was previously announced that tennis administrator and promoter Mike Davies has been elected in the Contributor Category and that Randy Snow has been elected in the Recent Player Category for his great achievements as a wheelchair tennis player. Additional members of the Class of 2012 will be announced within the month ahead. The Induction Ceremony will be hosted on July 14 at the International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum in Newport, R.I.

"Manuel Orantes’ 1975 US Open victory is in the books as one of the most impressive in tennis history,” said Tony Trabert, 1970 Hall of Famer and Chair of the Enshrinee Nominating Committee. “That achievement, as well as his many other victories, and his leadership as a dedicated Davis Cup player for Spain make him a true legend of tennis. He is well deserving of induction to the International Tennis Hall of Fame and we look forward to celebrating with Manuel at the induction ceremony in July, along with honoring the additional inductees, the remainder of whom will be announced shortly.”
 
Orantes, 62, who is originally from Granada and now resides in Barcelona, reached the world No. 2 ranking in 1973, and he remained in the year-end world top-10 for five consecutive years. In addition to his notable US Open victory over Connors, he was runner up to Bjorn Borg at the 1974 French Open. In all, Orantes won 33 singles titles, and compiled an impressive record of 647-247. He has a career doubles record of 298-155 and won 22 titles.
 
Orantes was an integral member of the Spanish Davis Cup team from 1967-1980. In his first year playing, 1967, the team advanced to the final, falling to the Australians. In Davis Cup records, Orantes is tied for the most number of years played (14) with Sergio Casal and Manuel Santana. Orantes' Davis Cup career resulted in 60 wins and 27 losses, including 39 singles victories. In 2009, Orantes was presented the Davis Cup Award of Excellence by the International Tennis Hall of Fame and the International Tennis Federation. He was also a member of the victorious Spanish team that won the 1978 World Team Cup.
 
Located in Newport, Rhode Island, the International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the history of tennis and honoring its greatest champions and contributors. Induction to the International Tennis Hall of Fame is based on the sum of one’s achievements and accomplishments in tennis and is the highest honor a player or leader in the sport can receive. Since 1955, the International Tennis Hall of Fame has inducted 220 people from 19 countries. Orantes is the fifth Spanish inductee to the International Tennis Hall of Fame. The other Spanish legends who have been inducted are Manuel Alonso, Andrés Gimeno, Arantxa Sánchez -Vicario, and Manuel Santana.
 
Eligibility & Voting
Inductees to the International Tennis Hall of Fame are elected in the categories of Recent Player, Master Player and Contributor.
 
Orantes has been elected to the Hall of Fame in the Master Player Category. Eligibility criteria for this category is as follows: competitors in the sport who have been retired for at least 20 years prior to consideration; a distinguished record of competitive achievement at the highest international level, with consideration given to integrity, sportsmanship, and character.
 
The International Masters Panel, which consists of Hall of Fame inductees and individuals who are highly knowledgeable of the sport and its history, votes on the Master Player. To be inducted in any category, an affirmative vote of 75% is required.
 
Induction Ceremony
The Class of 2012 Induction Ceremony will be hosted on July 14 at the International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum in Newport, R.I. The ceremony is held in conjunction with the Campbell's Hall of Fame Tennis Championships, an ATP World Tour event. Tickets for that day include seats for the Induction Ceremony and the tournament semi-finals, and tickets are available now on tennisfame.com or by phone at 866-914-FAME (2363).

Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline conchita

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2012, 11:49:53 AM »
Steve Tignor on tennis.com  (the famous comeback and leak in the bathroom.)


1975 U. S. Open Semi Final Manuel Orantes vs. Guillermo Vilas

 Manolo Orantes has always been a ghost in my tennis-watching memories. I started to understand tennis just as the Spaniard was disappearing from the top of the sport, or at least from the finals of Grand Slams. My earliest memory of hearing his name came during the 1977 U.S. Open final, a match that itself exists at the far edge of my conscious past, on a 10-inch black-and-white TV in my family’s kitchen.

That afternoon Guillermo Vilas was building a fourth-set lead over Jimmy Connors, a fact that caused CBS's commentators, Tony Trabert and Pat Summerall, to begin mentioning Orantes’ name in ominous tones. I didn’t know it at the time, but two years earlier, in the semifinals of the same tournament, Vilas had been up two sets to one and 5-0 in the fourth on Orantes before falling apart, squandering five match points, and losing it in the fifth. It’s still right at the top of the list of all-time comebacks, or, depending on your point of view, all-time chokes. For now we’ll go with comebacks, because yesterday Orantes was belatedly but deservedly inducted into the tennis Hall of Fame.

The night after the Vilas match, Orantes got back to his hotel room late, only to find that there was a leak in the bathroom. The plumber came and went, and Orantes finally went to sleep sometime in the wee hours. This being the U.S. Open, he had to go out and play the final against Jimmy Connors the next afternoon. Exhausted but nerve-free, he cruised past the defending champ in straight sets for the only Grand Slam title of his career.

I remember watching Orantes just once, a couple of years later, when he again beat Jimbo in a smaller event. His lefty feel seemed to be perfect for the softball style that was in vogue against Connors in those days. Orantes was an inheritor, from another Manolo—Santana—of Spain’s touch-game tradition, and as you can see above, he knew his way around the net. He won 33 tournaments and reached the French Open final in 1974. There he was an early victim of the soon-to-be-patented Bjorn Borg comeback. Orantes won the first two sets against the 18-year-old Swede; over the last three, he won just two games.

For me, Orantes will always be the guy who pulled off one of the most unlikely doubles in history, when he beat Vilas and Connors at the 1975 Open—even in the brief highlights from that match above, he looks appropriately ghostly. And how about some of the shots he hit to save those match points? An overhead on the line, a defensive lob near the line, and a lob approach that he placed an inch from the baseline. I'm surprised that Vilas was able to play tennis again after that match.

Only one day between the semi and final at a major? No sweat, Manolo might tell today’s spoiled pros, just stay up all night.
Self-praise is for losers. Be a winner. Stand for something. Always have class, and be humble.

Offline Alex

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2012, 10:28:20 PM »
who the hell is Manolo  :rofl_2:. too funny. oh yeah he def. Connors at the USO '75. just fooling with you Conchita. I still find this tennis hall of fame to be silly. who cares?

Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2012, 05:45:40 AM »
It's about respect, recognition, and tradition.
A wonderful history of the game is on full display.


Witness the origins of the game-  Real Tennis.




A visit there might change your mind.

http://www.tennisfame.com/museum-grounds/museum-overview


Don't forget your racquet, the grass courts are quite nice.





CONK da ball!!!

Online Babblelot

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2012, 02:24:50 PM »
Nice video find, conchi  :gleam:

I saw a couple of S&Vs in there. I'm still trying to wrap my head around the reason no one learns to S&V today is that the courts are too slow. Pat Rafter didn't have a big serve. In fact, Pat hit nothing but well placed kick serves. IMO the slower ball gave him more time to get in an advantageous position for his volley.

monster, what am I missing??? :dunno:
1995 USO, 1997 USO, 2004 USO, 2005 RG, 2005 USO, 2006 RG, 2006 USO, 2007 USO, 2008 RG, 2008 USO, 2009 USO, 2010 USO, 2011 USO, 2012 USOhttp://www.gifsoup.com/view4/1856936/2005safin-o.gif
http://www.gifsoup.com/view1/1857331/2004gaudio-o.gif

Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2012, 08:53:20 AM »
While there is some merit to the arguement that technology has made it easier for players to hit the ball harder, I personally think there's much more to it than that.

It is easier for developing players to learn groundstrokes and the lateral movements associated with baseline play.  As we all know, the path to success on court at any level is consistency and gaining proficiency from the backcourt is much easier (and fun for some folks!) than laying the foundation for an all-court or attacking game.  Therefore, that's what's being taught by today's pros and low level coaches (stateside at least).  Parents want immediate success for their prospective 'prodigy' and the ground game offers the easiest path early on.

I mean think about it, what sort of junior/parent wants to suffer through the tedium of hitting effective serves (1st and 2nd), learning the staccato movements necessary to transition to the forecourt only to be faced with the fearsome passing shots that even young teens can deliver these days?  Much easier to play patty cake from the backcourt. ;-()

I believe that you'll see the next 'Roger Williams' parent/coach take advantage of this situation and build a player modeled after the strengths Sampras and Agassi.  Great serve, great return, excellent mover, stalk the baseline and move forward at EVERY opportunity.  It's all about time and space.

Witness the improvements in Nole's game over the past year where he gives no ground on the baseline and is willing to stand in and take the ball on the rise.  He has also sharpened his serve though there is still room for improvement on that shot.
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2012, 09:30:43 AM »
Well said and I couldn't agree more especially with the "need" for early results. But I do wonder what your thoughts are about the slow court explanation. Is there that much validity to this, or are they using it as an excuse? It seems to me that a lot of the problem is that their initial volley is from too deep in the court allowing the ball to dip. I'm thinking if they had more time they could catch ball before it dips too much. I suppose the ball stays lower on a faster surface but that doesn't explain how Rafter got away with following in a kickserve. So, granted no one wants to learn a more aggressive style, how much credance do you give the slow surface explanation?
1995 USO, 1997 USO, 2004 USO, 2005 RG, 2005 USO, 2006 RG, 2006 USO, 2007 USO, 2008 RG, 2008 USO, 2009 USO, 2010 USO, 2011 USO, 2012 USOhttp://www.gifsoup.com/view4/1856936/2005safin-o.gif
http://www.gifsoup.com/view1/1857331/2004gaudio-o.gif

Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2012, 10:29:16 AM »
Let's use 'Our Pat' as an example.
As you've mentioned previously, his serve was NOT a blazer.
I remember him having great variety & consistency.
Who can forget 'The Kicka' out wide in the ad court setting up the world renowned and oft repeated 'wide to wide' tactic.  Even when the opponent knew it was coming it was still VERY effective.
Enough waxing :)).....back to my example of slow courts blunting an S&V or an attacking all-court game with Rafter as the example.

His slam record seems to back up this theory.

 Australian (15-9), French (12-8), Wimbledon (29-9), US. (20-7).

While The Kicka gave him time to close, I think the clay muted the effect of the variety in his serve.  Opponents could hang a bit further back on returns and get a better crack at him.  I suppose one could counter that the clay adversely reflected his movement and return game even more, but that would require a bit more delving into the facts than I've got time for at the moment. :)

In summary, I think slower courts in general reward the patty cake player and faster courts reward those courageous enough to step foot over the baseline in anything less than a flat out winning position.  After all, who wants to fail 40-50% of the time even though you still win the match.  Today's mindset especially amongst the pros is that all points carry equal weight and are worthy of full effort.  As you may have guessed, I believe nothing could be further from the truth. :))

I propose that for today only, I be nicknamed BabbleAlot! :rofl_2:
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2012, 06:36:57 PM »
Pat taking care of Blanco in the quarters of 1997 RG. He lost to Bruegura in the semis, not a bad result. Interesting look at S&V and C&C on clay  :cool:

Rafter Blanco French Open 1997 (1/2)


Rafter Blanco French Open 1997 (2/2)
1995 USO, 1997 USO, 2004 USO, 2005 RG, 2005 USO, 2006 RG, 2006 USO, 2007 USO, 2008 RG, 2008 USO, 2009 USO, 2010 USO, 2011 USO, 2012 USOhttp://www.gifsoup.com/view4/1856936/2005safin-o.gif
http://www.gifsoup.com/view1/1857331/2004gaudio-o.gif

Offline Alex

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2012, 09:50:32 PM »
Babs, regarding the court speeds, I think that Djokovic and Rog would still benefit. they can play well on fast courts, Nadal would not do well. I, personally don't want to see 3 points game at eg W any more.

Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2012, 07:01:50 AM »
How dare you drag mention of those players into this thread! :)>>>>

JFC Alex, now you're doing it too! :mad1:

We're talking tennis here.
Not how it relates to the current top 4.
Enter the discussion and stay on topic for crying out loud. :crying:

In addition to the smileys you & Sid suggested, might I add that I'd like to see one of an exploding head.  Sometimes yous guys drive me nuts with your mindless chatttttttering about your favorite players. :cursing:

 There are a few of us here that actually love tennis.  It's not about the pro players and not every thread has to include mention of them. :ranting:

Rant over.
I still love you. :))
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2012, 07:06:38 AM »
Pat taking care of Blanco in the quarters of 1997 RG. He lost to Bruegura in the semis, not a bad result. Interesting look at S&V and C&C on clay  :cool:

Rafter Blanco French Open 1997 (1/2)

Rafter Blanco French Open 1997 (2/2)
Great stuff B!!!

I think that because of their excellence with their skill set, the best S&V players did do fairly well on clay against all but the best clay courters.  I think that's why folks like Pat & Pete were able to beat lesser players but just couldn't perform consistently enough to punch through and win big clay court titles.

I think the same logic would apply to all but the very best clay courters attempting to play their style on grass.  A mere handful have been able to make the necessary adjustments in order to achieve on their least favorite surface.
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2012, 08:45:06 AM »

After all, who wants to fail 40-50% of the time even though you still win the match.


I never thought about this before, but after watching that clip of Rafter and Agassi   :bright idea:  When Roger decided he needed to become more aggressive, he hired Paul Anacone. But if Roger fails on his first S&V attempt, he abandons it. I've always noticed that about Roger. Being willing to lose +40% of the time is a big ask of anyone.

Very interesting, Hoss :good:
1995 USO, 1997 USO, 2004 USO, 2005 RG, 2005 USO, 2006 RG, 2006 USO, 2007 USO, 2008 RG, 2008 USO, 2009 USO, 2010 USO, 2011 USO, 2012 USOhttp://www.gifsoup.com/view4/1856936/2005safin-o.gif
http://www.gifsoup.com/view1/1857331/2004gaudio-o.gif

Offline monstertruck

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Re: Manolo Orantes elected to the Hall of Fame!
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2012, 08:59:52 AM »

After all, who wants to fail 40-50% of the time even though you still win the match.


I never thought about this before, but after watching that clip of Rafter and Agassi   :bright idea:  When Roger decided he needed to become more aggressive, he hired Paul Anacone. But if Roger fails on his first S&V attempt, he abandons it. I've always noticed that about Roger. Being willing to lose +40% of the time is a big ask of anyone.

Very interesting, Hoss :good:
You got it!!!
Witness Andy (not Murray).
He was completely unwilling to accept that fact.

It takes a mighty heart to accept the repeated passes, missed opportunities and the knowledge that it may look like you're getting beaten repeatedly.  Only confidence in your preparation and effort level can guide you through that tangled web of self-doubt.

I've said this before, most of today's players from hacker to pro don't like losing points.  They'll extend a rally with a low risk shot and attempt to not lose the point rather than have the courage to win the point.  A great example of this at the pro level are the 20+ shot rallies in ATP finals on hardcourts and grass!  Pardon me while I puke. :sad angel: :sick:
CONK da ball!!!