Author Topic: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)  (Read 31778 times)

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Offline tennisfan78

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #840 on: September 10, 2012, 10:04:45 PM »

This season we had 4 different winners at the 4 majors. That is just awesome!

Djoker winning his most dominant slam, so does Rafa and Federer. Now Murray wining his favorite slam.

Offline Babblelot

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Re: Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #841 on: September 10, 2012, 10:12:35 PM »

This season we had 4 different winners at the 4 majors. That is just awesome!

Djoker winning his most dominant slam, so does Rafa and Federer. Now Murray wining his favorite slam.

You could have just quoted me and said, "That's brilliant Bab, as usual! You're cool!!"
1995 USO, 1997 USO, 2004 USO, 2005 RG, 2005 USO, 2006 RG, 2006 USO, 2007 USO, 2008 RG, 2008 USO, 2009 USO, 2010 USO, 2011 USO, 2012 USOhttp://www.gifsoup.com/view4/1856936/2005safin-o.gif
http://www.gifsoup.com/view1/1857331/2004gaudio-o.gif

Offline FreeBird

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OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #842 on: September 10, 2012, 10:25:39 PM »

This season we had 4 different winners at the 4 majors. That is just awesome!

Djoker winning his most dominant slam, so does Rafa and Federer. Now Murray wining his favorite slam.

You could have just quoted me and said, "That's brilliant Bab, as usual! You're cool!!"

He was just setting you up - throwing you a little softball so you could expound upon your - well, uh, your abundance of arrog - er, I mean self-confidence.  And you didn't disappoint! :)
Good luck on the court is nice to have, but it's usually extraneous when playing against Baker.

Offline tennisfan78

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Re: Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #843 on: September 10, 2012, 10:29:05 PM »

This season we had 4 different winners at the 4 majors. That is just awesome!

Djoker winning his most dominant slam, so does Rafa and Federer. Now Murray wining his favorite slam.

You could have just quoted me and said, "That's brilliant Bab, as usual! You're cool!!"

If you have predicted this before, then kudos to you Bab!!!

Offline tennisfan78

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #844 on: September 10, 2012, 10:30:03 PM »

any body know how the rakings will be after this?

Offline TheLogo

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #845 on: September 10, 2012, 10:33:12 PM »
Congrats to Murray! 

Of the big 4, he definitely has had the best year (Wimby final, Olympic Gold and US Open Slam).  Hopefully the rankings reflect that.
The Logo Knows!!!

Offline HarryWild

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #846 on: September 11, 2012, 01:32:54 AM »

any body know how the rakings will be after this?

I am just guessing and you ask so; here goes:
 
 1.Novak Djokovic Serbia   
 2.Roger Federer Switzerland 
 3.Andy Murray Scotland   
 4.Rafael Nadal Spain   
 5.David Ferrer Spain   
 6.Tomas Berdych Czech Republic
 7.Juan Martin del Potro
 8.Janko Tipsarevic
 9.Jo-Wilfried Tsonga France   

Others I did not take the time to figure out at 10 and below!  Other then say that James Blake is at 102 and Donald Young is 122? 
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 01:36:58 AM by HarryWild »

Offline Start da Game

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #847 on: September 11, 2012, 03:22:39 AM »
:rofl_2:

Murray is just hitting the ball hard enough to get it over the net. Nole keeps slugging.
Quote
...so I am going to bed.
Good. That way we don't have to put up with your silly posts.

 :rofl_2: :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

din't you see how murray through out the first set tried the slice tactic and it paid dividends in the form of throwing novak off his rhythm........though his slice was punished a few times novak just doesn't like that shot........din't you also see how he rolled those forehands down the middle without trying to attack with it and kept it mostly to the middle of the court? he employed the rafa tactic there........i knew it was going to be one of those tactics.........

i also kept saying that djokovic looks very beatable.........just that his draw was a silly joke he reached the final........d pot should have won that quarterfinal.........

overall well done to andy, he ended this long wait........this slam win also takes the pressure off rafa when facing murray.........murray being his best friend, rafa was becoming too soft when playing murray having taken him out thrice in the semis of slams last year........now he can be back to his ruthless best again........

Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline Start da Game

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #848 on: September 11, 2012, 03:30:06 AM »

any body know how the rakings will be after this?

I am just guessing and you ask so; here goes:
 
 1.Novak Djokovic Serbia   
 2.Roger Federer Switzerland 
 3.Andy Murray Scotland   
 4.Rafael Nadal Spain   
 5.David Ferrer Spain   
 6.Tomas Berdych Czech Republic
 7.Juan Martin del Potro
 8.Janko Tipsarevic
 9.Jo-Wilfried Tsonga France   

Others I did not take the time to figure out at 10 and below!  Other then say that James Blake is at 102 and Donald Young is 122?

djokovic does not deserve to be at the top.......murray does........how funny that this year now belongs to murray as he won two prestigious prizes compared to one each of rafa, djoko and fed........

2012 belongs to murray by a slight margin........with fed having to defend truck load of points and djokovic looking very beatable everywhere, he should just go on a tear and finish the year no.1........he deserves it........he should target this period post us open where most of the players show up tired and there are 1000s of points to be collected........this is not the time to lose focus........he has a chance of achieving the top spot in a field of legends........make the most of it........
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline Gawdblessya

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #849 on: September 11, 2012, 04:08:58 AM »
l omitted to congratulate Djokovic fans upon his excellent run at the USO.   Sorry that he couldn't make more of the 5th set, but despite playing less than his best tennis at times, he put up a fight, and displayed his superb skills at times too, to take it to 5 sets.   I hope he won't be too disappointed - he has had an excellent year to date, winning the AO, being a finalist at the FO & the USO & a semi-finalist at Wimbledon. He hasn't looked as compelling as last year, but he has nevertheless had a very good year. He should be proud of his efforts, particularly as he has played an awful lot in an effort to defend his ranking, and this has taken its toll. It can't be easy - well done to him for his efforts.   

Carpe Diem

Offline monstertruck

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #850 on: September 11, 2012, 05:10:20 AM »
Congrats to Murray! 

Of the big 4, he definitely has had the best year (Wimby final, Olympic Gold and US Open Slam).  Hopefully the rankings reflect that.
Agreed.
Banner year for The Scot.
Should make for an interesting 2013 as I don't expect any of the other top 3 to just lay down and go away.  Least of all Nole.  Perhaps this loss will light a fire under him so that he will push the game to new heights. ://

Nice to see Andy(not Roddick) lift the cup.
It's been a long wait and he's earned it.
CONK da ball!!!

Offline euroka1

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #851 on: September 11, 2012, 05:48:44 AM »

any body know how the rakings will be after this?


Are people familiar with this web site ?

http://live-tennis.eu/

It is not always right but it does keep a pretty close accounting on a day-by-day basis.

Offline Dallas

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #852 on: September 11, 2012, 11:24:57 AM »
An interview with: ANDY MURRAY

Monday, September 10, 2012

PRINT
THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

 

Q.  First of all, congratulations.  From my perspective, it looked like you played like a man just possessed out there.  Just talk about the fight that you had and the feeling of having this trophy in front of you.

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, it was obviously a very tough match.  You know, mentally, the last three, four days have been pretty tiring.  You know, when the conditions have been like they have been, you need to focus so hard, you know, on almost every shot because, you know, the ball is very hard to control.  So mentally it was challenging, you know, aside from it being, you know, a slam final and having not won one before, playing against Novak who, you know, on this surface is ‑‑ I mean, in the slams I don't think he's lost for, you know, a couple of years.  So it was an incredibly tough match, and, yeah, obviously it felt great at the end.  "Relief" is probably the best word I would use to, you know, describe how I'm feeling just now.  Yeah, very, very happy that I managed to come through because if I had lost this one from two sets up, that would have been a tough one to take.

 

Q.  You just said "relief."  Is there a moment where you thought, "exultation" too?

ANDY MURRAY:  I don't know what that means.  (Laughter.)

 

Q.  Thrilled, you know, excitement.

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah.  I mean, obviously you're feeling a lot of things.  You know, like I was obviously very emotional.  You know, I cried, you know, a little bit on the court.  You're not sad; you're incredibly happy.  You're in a little bit of disbelief because when I have been in that position many times before and not won, you do think, you know, Is it ever going to happen?  Then when it finally does, you just ‑‑ yeah, you're obviously very, very excited.  But, yeah, mainly relieved to have got over that, that last hurdle.

 

Q.  For 76 years British players have carried a millstone around their neck.  What is it like to have finally done it?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, when you're on the court, you don't necessarily feel it, but I know when I was serving for the match, there's a sense of how, you know, how big a moment that is in British tennis history really.  So, you know, that obviously adds to it.  I know more than most, you know, British players, I have been asked about it many times when I got close to winning Grand Slams before.  I get asked about it more and more even after I won the Olympics.  I still got asked, When are you going to win a Grand Slam?  So, yeah, it's great to have finally done it, and I said in one of the interviews after the match, I hope now, you know, it inspires some kids to play tennis and also takes away the notion that British tennis players choke or don't win or it's not a good sport.  You know, it's in a very good place in the UK right now.  Obviously Laura has done very well.  The Olympics was great for us.  Liam Broady was in the final here in the juniors.  It's in a good place.  I hope it stays that way.

 

Q.  When Novak took that timeout, what was going through your mind?  And how did you keep focused on doing the job?

ANDY MURRAY:  Actually, I felt fine after I got that break to serve for it at 5‑2.  I was still obviously very nervous around sort of 3‑2, 4‑2.  You still are a long way from the finish line.  When the conditions are like that, really anything can happen.  You know, I got myself up after a minute or so of sitting down and just went to the back of the court and thought, you know, Where are you going to serve, first point?  Once I got that first point, I settled down and felt fine.  I have served matches very well my whole career.  I have never really had a problem with it.  Yeah, today was the same.

 

Q.  How tough was it at the start of the fifth set when he had come back?  Did the other finals go through your mind at all?

ANDY MURRAY:  No, I wasn't thinking about the other finals.  I was thinking a bit more about what happened the last couple of sets and the situation I kind of found myself in after I guess it was nearly four hours of play by that stage.  I went to the toilet after the fourth set and just, you know, had a think and, you know, said, It's just one more set.  Give everything.  You don't want to come off this court with any regrets.  Don't get too down on yourself.  Just try and fight.  I got a bit fortunate to get the break at the beginning of the set, and that helped.  I got a net cord on the slice backhand.  Then I settled down a bit after that.

 

Q.  I'm sure you're going to be asked this question a lot:  Can you give us a sense how different this was to winning the gold medal in the Olympics?  One, a huge victory for the country; the other, a huge victory for you, vindication.  How do you compare and contrast them a bit?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, it's definitely different.  You know, at the Olympics there was so much going on, you know, with all of the other sports and everyone was doing really well.  There was a lot of momentum and stuff.  You know, I had also the mixed doubles to focus on a bit.  When you know you're guaranteed a couple of silver medals, that also maybe helped me a little bit going into the final there.  Whereas here, you know, I was still doubting myself right up to a few minutes before you go on to play the match.  You're thinking, you know, Are you going to be able to do this?  This is going to be tough.  The match against him always is going to hurt, you know, as well.  Physically it's challenging.  Yeah, it's something I have never done before.  I have been in this position many times and not managed to get through.  So there is a lot of things you're thinking about before you go out on the court.  I am just so relieved, like I said, to finally have got through and can put this one behind me and hopefully win more.

 

Q.  What are your thoughts now on just how difficult the personal road has been for you to get to this first Grand Slam championship?

ANDY MURRAY:  I mean, it's been tough because, you know, I have lost a lot of tight matches and semifinals and lost comfortably in my first few slam finals, as well.  I mean, obviously not everyone in here sees all of the stuff that goes on away from the court in terms of the training that you do and, you know, I guess the physical sort of suffering, the stuff you put your body through on a weekly basis to try and prepare for these moments so you can play for four‑and‑a‑half hours at a high intensity.  That's what's tough.  I mean, my life is still very, very good.  Still very fortunate to be able to do this for a living.  But, you know, when you get so close to achieving really my last goal I had left to achieve in tennis in winning a Grand Slam, and when you have been there many times and not done it, it is easy to doubt yourself.  You know, I'm just, like I say, glad I managed to finally do it.  Happy I was able to do it for all the guys I work with, as well, because they have been with me pretty much from the start and seen all of those things that go on away from the court.

 

Q.  How old were you when you first felt that weight of, you know, the British history?  Secondly, when it was slipping away a bit, two sets to Love lead, did you get scared and think, Oh, my God, I'm going to let this slip away from me?

ANDY MURRAY:  I didn't feel scared, but it's something that you do ‑‑ like I said, at the end of the fourth set, you are thinking, What's gone on here the last couple of sets?  What can I do to try and change it?  Obviously when you're playing against someone like Novak who he has come back in a lot of matches, especially here, and he is in very good shape, you're going to have to match him right up until the end.  So, yeah, even during the match you're still questioning yourself a bit and you're still doubting yourself a little bit.  Yeah, I just managed to stay tough enough today and get through.

 

Q.  How old were you when you first felt that weight?

ANDY MURRAY:  I mean, I don't know exactly.  I mean, probably when I lost in the Aussie Open final, that may be the first time really, you know, I was starting to feel like, you know, something that kind of everyone was maybe expecting to happen.  But I knew deep down how tough it was to do it because of the people you were competing against.  So I started to question whether I was going to be able to do it, you know, around that age.  But I always worked hard and tried to do all the right things.  I'm glad it finally happened.

 

Q.  You have obviously had this fabulous tournament, this fabulous summer, but looking back on the process you just talked about, you may have shared this before, but what was the toughest stretch, the toughest moment or when you had the most doubt?

ANDY MURRAY:  After I lost to Novak in Australia last year, I wasn't feeling good at all for pretty much into the clay court season.  So that was a good three‑month stretch, three‑, four‑month stretch where I really struggled with my game.  I struggled, you know, for motivation.  I lost and I think I lost in the first round of Indian Wells and Miami.  You know, I really wasn't playing well, wasn't enjoying it so much, and I stopped working with Alex Corretja around that time, as well.  That was also hard.  I mean, since I come on the tour, that was probably the hardest part.

 

Q.  Having four different winners this year in the slams and having you won the Olympics and being in the final of Wimbledon, do you consider yourself the most successful player of the year until now, more or less?  Another question:  I remember you didn't like to play in wind.  You told us many, many times.  Did you attend a navigation college in South Hampton to improve your attitude towards playing in the wind?

ANDY MURRAY:  No, I didn't.  I don't think I have had the best year on the tour, no.  I think the last few months have been great for me, but, you know, there is more to the tennis tour than just the Grand Slams.  You know, Novak has played great tennis in most of the Masters Series, as well.  Roger has got himself back to No. 1.  You know, I think it is important to remember the tennis season.  It starts in January, finishes in November, there is four slams, but there is also many other tournaments to get to No. 1 in the world, which I think if you're No. 1 you deserve to be the player of the year.  You can't just rely on only playing the Grand Slams.  You need to do well at the other events, as well.  I haven't done as well as I have needed to get to No. 1 in the world.  I would say Novak or Roger would be the best players this year.  But there is still a few months left.  And, no, I didn't do the South Hampton thing.

 

Q.  There is a term in American sports, 'act like you've been there before.  Is this utter fatigue you're going through?  You appear as if you're coming in here after a big loss, not like the culmination ‑‑ there is the first smile.  That's what I'm looking for.  You showed so much personality after the loss in Wimbledon and winning the Olympics.  Emotionally, what level of euphoria are you going through now that you have this huge accomplishment behind you as opposed to in front of you?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, it's hard to describe because I'm thinking a lot just now.  I'm thinking a lot about a lot of different things.  I have obviously just seen the guys that I work with, I saw my girlfriend, my mom, you know, all those people.  I think everyone is just in a little bit of shock, to be honest, that it's kind of happened.  I see my mom after I have lost in slam finals and stuff, and she's been really upset.  Everyone is really, really happy, but...

 

Q.  This would be a good time to show it.

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah.  (Laughter.)  Exactly.  I think we're sort of learning from Lendl a little bit.  (Laughter.)

 

Q.  Learn the on‑the‑court stuff, not the off.

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah.  He doesn't smile a whole lot.  (Laughter.)  Yeah, it's hard to explain.  It's been a long, long journey to this point.  So I'm just ‑‑ I don't know.  I don't know if it's disbelief or whatever.  I'm very, very happy on the inside.  I'm sorry if I'm not showing it as you would like.

 

Q.  Back to 1936 for a minute.  I have been in this room many, many times.  I have heard the topic, the drought brought up with Tim Henman many times and with you.  It's a topic you have had to endure.  With this profession comes a ton of pressure.  How much pressure has it been, the hopes Britain has had upon you?  And it was that way with Tim before and others.  Talk about that.  And also how great a relief is it to finally have shed that?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I did get asked about that all of the time for the last few years.  Most press conferences I would do I would get asked a question along those sort of lines, and it does build pressure a little bit.  You try not to think about it much when you're playing, but like I said, when I was serving for the match, it's something that you ‑‑ you know, I realized how important that moment was, and, you know, for British tennis or British sport.  It's something that hasn't happened for a long time obviously in our country.  And, yeah, I'm obviously proud that I managed to, you know, to achieve it, and, yeah, I don't have to get asked that stupid question again.  (Laughter.)

 

Q.  As a follow‑up, I want to ask:  Did the Olympic victory help, too?  A stepping stone?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I think even after Wimbledon this year, I felt much better after losing that match than I had after other slams.  The support I had afterwards was something I hadn't really experienced before.  That also helped me to get over it quickly.  The Olympics was ‑‑ I mean, it was obviously huge for me.  It was the biggest week of my life, for sure.  But still today, you know, before the match, when I was sitting in the locker room beforehand, like I say, there are still doubts.  You're still thinking, If I lose this one, you know, no one's ever lost their first five finals.  You know, I just didn't really want to be that person.  It was good to win.

 

Q.  You talked about feeling different going into the Olympic final after Wimbledon.  Going into this US Open final, did it feel different?  If so, how?

ANDY MURRAY:  Well, going into the Olympic final I felt different than going into the Wimbledon final.  I think I dealt with both situations fairly well.  I wasn't too nervous.  But like I say, today I was very nervous before the match.  You know, like I say, I was doubting myself a bit.  I mean, I don't know whether winning the Olympics helped me today or not, but, you know, I don't think the Olympics victory, when I got into the fifth set there, that wasn't something I was thinking about, you know, at all.

 

Q.  But your mentality going in.  You said the mentality going in after Wimbledon...

ANDY MURRAY:  No, I felt ‑‑ coming to this tournament I felt much better than I had done maybe going into slams in the past.  I felt more comfortable with myself.  But today when you're playing for a Grand Slam and it's something I haven't done before, my mentality wasn't, Well, I won the Olympics, so today is going to be a breeze and I'm going to deal with the situation really well.  You know, I was very nervous in a couple of hours leading up to the match.

 

Q.  The fact you had to fight so hard, the quarters, the semis, beating three tough opponents in a row, and then Novak, does that make the win any more sweet?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I think ‑‑ well, I mean, however I got my first slam after the losses I have had, it was going to feel great.  But this tournament, I didn't really feel like I played my best.  I felt like, you know, the matches maybe sometimes because of the conditions, you just have to try and find a way and get through.  But, yeah, I mean, the final today, I think it meant more to me winning it in four‑and‑a‑half hours and the five‑set match and having been up two sets to nothing and him coming back, you know, will have meant more to me because of that.

 

Q.  You have ticked off various things obviously with two massive wins.  Would becoming world No. 1 about be the next target in your only personal performance?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, all players, once you get near to the top of the game, that's one of the goals is to try and get to the world No. 1.  I can't say this year it's necessarily possible for me to do it because I didn't have a particularly good clay court season and I didn't do well in the Masters Series in Cincinnati and Montreal and also in Indian Wells.  I had too many losses early in those tournaments.  But that is the next step.  To do that, you need to be consistent throughout the whole year.  That's something that Novak and Roger and Rafa have done incredibly well the last few years.  He made it very, very difficult for guys to get up there.  I'm definitely going to try.  It's something I'd love to do, to get to No. 1.  It's a very tough thing to do.

 

Q.  Other than the fan support that you get at Wimbledon and the Olympics, have you ever had this much support on the road?  And were you prepared for Djokovic perhaps to be the fan favorite tonight?

ANDY MURRAY:  I always had very good support in New York since I came the first time.  I mean, I was 18 at the time when I played the seniors here the first time.  I always had really good support.  Tonight I didn't ‑‑you know, I had no real expectations of who they would rather win, you know, but I think they wanted to see a great match.  You know, they wanted to see a long match.  At the start, they were supporting us fairly equally.  Then the third and fourth sets they seemed to be going for him a bit more.  Then the beginning of the fifth, you know, the support was back with me.  It was, yeah, it was just quite up and down.  I think they have obviously seen a lot of tennis here.  They wanted to see a great match.  Yeah, the support at the end and the atmosphere we got to play in tonight was incredible.

 

Q.  Since you're dreaming about winning your Grand Slam, did you make any promise to yourself what happened if I won a Grand Slam?  Can you share it?  When you started the coach‑athlete's relationship, did you make a promise to Ivan if I win a Grand Slam...

ANDY MURRAY:  No.  Knowing him, you know, after we will have a chat about the match tonight and then we will be discussing, unfortunately, the practice schedule for the next few weeks before the tournaments in China.  (Laughter.)  But, I mean, in the past before some of the slams, like in Australia and stuff, I had spoken to the guys I worked with and said, you know, If I win, we will do this.  One of them was jumping out of a plane.  One of them was everyone had to shave their heads.  But, yeah, for this one, we had none, unfortunately.

 

Q.  The late great Fred Perry was a great earthy guy; didn't exactly come through in a traditional British way.  If you could be magically sitting down with him in a back room over here chatting for a moment or two, what would you say to him and what do you think he'd say to you?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, obviously I don't know.  I never got the chance to meet him.  But it would have been nice to have spoken to someone from Britain that had, you know, won major tournaments before.  That definitely would have helped me if I would have got the chance.  But, you know, I used to wear his clothing line when I was growing up.  Yeah, I mean, I'm sure he's smiling from up there that someone has finally managed to do it from Britain.  Yeah, I'm very, very happy, and I just hope it's not a long, long way ‑‑ I hope I can see another British player in my lifetime win a Grand Slam.

 

Q.  You never heard about BBC radio?  He was on the radio.  That was before your time?

ANDY MURRAY:  I think so, or I may have been a very young kid.  But I haven't heard him on the radio.

 

Q.  Talking about smiles, there was a moment when you and Ivan Lendl were able to smile together after the match.  Did he tell you anything that you can tell us after this match?

ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I saw all of the guys in the locker room afterwards, and, yeah, I saw him.  He just said, you know, I'm proud of you; well done.  We had a hug.  Then someone sprayed champagne all down my back and over him.  I think it was Danny.  That kind of ended that.  He started swearing.  (Laughter.)  Yeah, and that was that.

 

Q.  During the past two weeks I don't know if anyone worked harder than you on the practice courts.  What drives you to work so hard?

ANDY MURRAY:  Well, moments like this, I think.  That's why we do it.  It's why we play the game and put all the work in off the court.  You know, if I hadn't trained hard I wouldn't have been able to last.  My match a couple of days ago was four hours; today it was four and a half hours.  So that's really what it's for, for moments like this.  Sometimes you question whether it's all worth it ‑ and I have done that a few times ‑  but after the summer that I have had, you realize that it is worth it.  There's only one way to get where you want to be, and that's with hard work and dedication.

 

Q.  You talked about the doubts that you have had.  What have you proved to yourself today?

ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I proved that, you know, I can win the Grand Slams.  I proved that I can last four‑and‑a‑half hours and come out on top against, you know, one of the strongest guys physically that tennis had probably seen especially on this surface.  So they would probably be the things that I would say I have learned tonight.  But, you know, to not doubt myself physically and mentally from now on.  You know, I'm sure that would have a positive impact in the future.

 

Q.  The easy play for us is to say that Ivan was a game changer for you.  Was he?  If so, how?  What do you think was the key?

ANDY MURRAY:  I think he definitely helped, that's for sure.  I mean, it's hard to say in terms of a percentage how much difference he will have made.  There was a lot of people that around the middle part of this year didn't think that it was working well and I wasn't learning from him that it wasn't just, you know, a good situation.  But, you know, I have enjoyed working with him.  I have listened to him a lot.  You know, he's definitely, definitely helped.  Having him in your corner for any player would be a big bonus.  Not many guys have won as much as he did want to go into coaching or want to be around tennis.  I think because he had such a long break after he finished, you know, he wanted to get back into it.  I think he's enjoying it.  You know, he was obviously one of the most successful tennis players ever.  You know, I'm sure it gave a little boost to his ego tonight, as well, that I won today, you know, after just sort of nine months with him.  (Laughter.)  It's been great so far, and I hope we can keep working well together.

 

Q.  Is there a certain message he gave you, Be more aggressive?  Toughness?  What?

ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I think it was the thing just to try to keep going for my shots and giving 110%, you know, not leave anything out there on the court, because, you know, he knows how hard Grand Slams are to come by and how hard you need to work to give yourself a chance to win them.  You don't want to, you know, step off the court not doing yourself justice.  I felt maybe couple years ago in Australia a couple of years ago when I played Novak in the final there I didn't necessarily do, and that hurt me a lot.  That's probably why I struggled for a few months afterwards.  If I had lost tonight it would have hurt a lot, but I would have known I would have tried my best and given it 110%.  That's what he asks of me.  If I do that, then he's happy.

 

Q.  You spoke a lot about the enormous relief you're feeling at the moment.  How do you think this might change you either as a person or in the way you do business on the court?

ANDY MURRAY:  I hope it doesn't change me as a person.  That would be a bad thing.  I think on the court, you know, hopefully if I get into situations like this in the future I won't be having all the doubts that I was having before the match today.  I will maybe just be a little more confident than I was before this tournament.  That's actually it.  You know, I hope it doesn't change too much.  You know, I'm still gonna going to have all the same friends and family and stay in the same house and train in the same places.  Nothing much is going to change in that respect.  There may be a few more busy press conferences now and a little bit more demands on my time, but that's part of the job and that's worth it.

 

Q.  Getting married?

ANDY MURRAY:  Justin's told me all about married life, and he said it's not all that...

 

Q.  It's way tougher.

ANDY MURRAY:  No.  Well, I don't have any plans for it just now.

 

Q.  Yesterday Victoria Azarenka said after losing to Serena that she felt blessed to play in the era of Serena Williams, a woman who has beaten her 10 out of 11 times.  She said the reason she felt blessed was because it drove her to raise her level of tennis beyond what she was otherwise.  You are playing in an era of greatness as well.  There has been conversation about you breaking into the strata of Roger and Rafa and Novak.  Novak said he felt privileged to play in this era.  Talk about that and what it means to do what you have had to do to crack into what you have done tonight?

ANDY MURRAY:  I mean, I have always said that, you know, playing against these guys makes you much better.  When you see physically how strong someone like Rafa is, I played him many times, you know, that drives you.  You see also how hard he works.  That makes you realize what you have to do nowadays, I think, to get to the top of the game and to compete with those guys.  You know, I obviously played Roger many times, as well.  You know, just the way that he plays, the consistency that he's shown over the last whatever, seven, eight, nine, ten years, I think it's going to be tough to see that again.  Obviously Novak, the last few years, you know, you see the way he moves around the court.  He took things I think especially on a hard court to a new level.  Yeah, I'm very happy to be part of this era in tennis.  I think everyone probably in here would agree it's one of the best ever.  I think playing against them has made me improve so much.  You know, I always said that maybe if I played another era maybe I would have won more, but I wouldn't have been as good a tennis player.  I think that's how you should be judged at the end of your career, not just on how much you're winning but on the people you're competing against and how good a player you actually were.  Those guys are some of the best of all time.

 

Q.  A few minutes ago you spoke of this being a long journey.  What gives you the most satisfaction now of what you have overcome during that journey?

ANDY MURRAY:  I don't know.  I mean, I think probably, I mean, proving to myself that I could do it.  Like I said, there are times where you don't really think ‑‑ you know, I'm sure there are a lot of people that thought ‑‑you know, I have been questioned when I was younger.  I didn't work hard enough and, you know, that I wasn't mentally strong enough and I didn't listen to my coaches and stuff.  You know, I always did listen to my coaches.  I just was very immature sometimes on the court.  I have tried to improve that side of things.  Yeah, I think I just proving to myself is probably the most pleasing part about tonight, because there are times when I didn't know if I was going to be able to do it.

 

Q.  There were a lot of extraordinary points, sort of another aspect of this era, all the great defense.  How does the body feel after four‑and‑a‑half hours of that?

ANDY MURRAY:  It definitely feels a lot better when you win.  (Laughter.)  You know, on this surface especially things hurt a lot in the morning.  I actually normally when I play on hard courts take painkillers most days before matches.  Actually today was the only day I took any painkillers during the tournament.  I felt really good for the most part in terms of, you know, my joints and stuff.  But it does take a lot out of the body, and this is for sure the most demanding surface.  You know, you can wake up with stiff back, hips, knees.  I can't do it, but the way Novak slides on the court I'm sure his ankles and stuff are pretty sore in the morning.  But, yeah, I actually feel fine just now.  I think maybe because it wasn't that warm out there.  I feel fine just now.  I felt fine at the end of the match.  Hopefully I would have been able to go a little bit longer.

                       

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Offline Dallas

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #853 on: September 11, 2012, 11:25:33 AM »
An interview with: NOVAK DJOKOVIC

Monday, September 10, 2012

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THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

 

Q.  Is gonna be the first question in English for you:  You come from Serbia; you are our brother; you showed you are brave; we love you and we admire you and we are very proud to have you as a Serbian.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Thank you.

 

Q.  So how do you feel about this final today?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, any loss is a bad loss, you know.  There is no question about it.  I'm disappointed to lose the match, but in the back of my mind I knew that I gave it all.  I really, really tried to fight my way back through.  I had a great opponent today.  He deserved to win this Grand Slam more than anybody, I'm sure, because over the years he's been a top player.  He's been so close; lost four finals.  Now he has won it, so I would like to congratulate him.  Definitely, you know, happy that he won it.

 

Q.  As you just said, any loss is a bad loss.  Andy has been so close so many times.  You and Roger and Rafa have all said at various times it's bound to happen for him to win one.  If there is any consolation in the loss?  You know, is it nice to see Andy finally ascend to that hierarchy?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  As I said, it's nice, definitely.  There is no doubt that he deserves to win the Grand Slam.  I mean, playing so consistently well and winning against the top players for many times on many surfaces.  He has proven today that he's a champ and he deserves to be where he is, no question about it.

 

Q.  I mean, he looked like a man possessed out there tonight.  Obviously with the gold medal and just not giving up out there.  You have played him so many times on big arenas.  Talk about the way he played tonight.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  He played well.  I mean, it was a struggle for both of us, you know, to deal with the conditions.  Yeah, you know, at times we made a lot of unforced errors; at times we played some great points.  Two sides of the court with two different conditions, you know.  Playing down the wind and against the win is a huge advantage or disadvantage the way you look at it.  But it was the same for both of us.  The beginning of the fifth set was the turning point.  Was crucial, you know.  I should have not lost the two breaks in a row.  After that, it was really tough to come back.  And, you know, I definitely congratulate him, because he came up with big serving when he needed to.  I'm just satisfied and proud of my achievement, you know.  I know that I gave it all.  That's always the goal.

 

Q.  The way you fired that last return of the match kind of reminded me of the return you had last year against Federer.  Did you have similar preparation towards that point as you did a year ago?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Yeah, obviously he was 5‑2 up in serve and 40‑15.  I mean, I didn't give up.  I mean, I had trouble moving already for last couple of games.  I knew that my only chance really was to go for the shots.  It didn't work this time; it worked last year.  That's sport.

 

Q.  Memorable night.  Can you remember running so much in a single match?  Do you think it contributed to what looked like cramping up towards the end?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I think we both did a lot of running.  Yeah, it was unfortunate really to not be able to come up with big shots at the right time.  Yeah, it forced me to go for winners or mistakes.  Unfortunately I did a lot of mistakes on the 2‑4 in the fifth and lost the crucial break.  After that, it was just a routine hold for him.

 

Q.  Obviously he, not enjoys, but handles these conditions very well.  You don't like them.  You didn't like them in your previous match.  You know, you got unlucky with net cords and everything else.  I think it would be very easy for you to say, This is not going to be my night.  Obviously the first two sets it looked that way.  How did you push through that and get to a fifth set?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I had matches to this similar in my career, especially in the last two years.  We had a long around five‑hour match in Australia as well earlier this year.  I really tried mentally to be out there and physically always push myself over the limits, you know.  It's a Grand Slam final and you want to win.  There is no question about it.  We both wanted this trophy.  We were very hungry for it.  You know, if I won that first set and had some chances maybe the match would go a different way.  But look, you know, there is no reason to go back and say, What if?  What if?  He's a Grand Slam winner and he deserves to be there.

 

Q.  Talking about the match, can you talk about the frustration and angry at the conditions?  You fought to the fifth set.  Do you think maybe the start of the match was the key to it?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, we were both frustrated.  It's the same for both players, you know.  It's just the way you handle it.  Even though I was two sets down I still believed I could come back to the match.  I played really well third and fourth.  Yeah, a little bit slow start of the fifth and cost me the victory today.

 

Q.  Every year the journalist have to decide who is the best player of the year.  This year since 2003 is the first year that there are four players who won four different majors, but he won the Olympic Games plus he was in the final in Wimbledon.  Do you think right now even if the year is not over he deserves to be possibly the No. 1 of 2012?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I'm not a journalist.  (Laughter.)  I guess it's on you to decide.

 

Q.  I want to ask you to just reflect on your year, which has been a tremendous year and a lot has gone on.  I want to ask particularly what was physically going on with you at the end of the match?  What was the problem?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, it was great two weeks for me overall.  I played really good tennis when I needed to.  Today it was just not meant to be.  You know, we played almost five hours.  A lot of running, a lot of rallies.  I think that says enough about the effort that we both put, you know, physical, mental effort.  This time I didn't win the match, and that's sport.

 

Q.  You had some good early wins and then you had some real tough times.  You were in the shadow of Rafa and Roger.  You hung in there, kept on going, and then you scored your incredible breakthrough.  Andy now has persevered through many, many losses and has broken through.  My question is:  How does a pro deal with that?  How does he keep on going?  How does he keep his arc of his career going upward?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, I think in my experience it was just a matter of belief, really mentally to mature and to understand what you need to do to become a Grand Slam champion and to become the best in the world.  Andy has all the capacity he needs, all the talent on the court.  He's dedicated; he's professional.  He has proven that many years already, you know, with his results.  Us four, you know, we are taking this game to another level, and it's really nice to be part of such a strong men's tennis era, you know.  Obviously last couple of years ‑‑ I mean, I'm sure he's gonna answer better ‑‑ but it was a necessary experience for him also to understand, you know, what he needs to do to be in the position that he is today.  So it was kind of similar story for me couple years back.  You know, he has done it.

 

Q.  Two years ago after the final you mentioned Rafa made one step; last year you made giant step; this year four different men can day, four gentlemen, four musketeers.  What do you think about today's men's field?  It's so competitive, so close.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I'm not sure what's gonna happen next couple of years.  Obviously nothing is predictable.  You know, I'm trying to think about myself.  As I said, it's a privilege to be part of this era.  It's obvious that the four of us, you know, we get to the later stages of every single Grand Slam.  Andy winning tonight makes it even more competitive and more interesting for people to watch it.

 

Q.  Does it change your approach for the fight for No. 1 in any way?  Andy Murray winning today, does it change in any way your approach to the fight for No. 1?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  No.  My approach is always the same, you know.  I'm going to continue on to do what I've done so far.  I have a great team of people around me.  Being No. 1 of the world this year, end of this year is, yes, one of the objectives.  I'm going to try to recover from this and move on.

 

Q.  You seemed to play a lot of slice tonight especially on the backhand side especially early in the match.  Was that a tactic to adjust to him or to adjust to the wind?  Both?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, yeah, the conditions were requiring a lot of change of pace and variety.  I think we both used the slice efficiently, you know.  It's really difficult to predict because the wind was blowing very strong from all parts of the court.  You know, sometimes ball just sits there and you have to make an extra step to come to it.  You know, it was difficult to play, yeah.

 

Q.  You came around the net to congratulate him and hug him in a very sporting gesture.  You're the first person he sees in an extremely historic moment for Britain.  What did he seem like to have having won it and what did you say to him?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  What I said is what I said to you, that he deserves to win and I'm glad that he has won this trophy.  I mean it.  I mean, it must feel great for him.  It's his first Grand Slam.

 

Q.  Could you see on his face...

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Yeah, I mean, you know, at that point a lot of emotions go through your mind.  He's gonna answer better how he feels.

 

Q.  Going back to the match a little bit, you spiked that ball into the stands to win the fourth set; can you take us into the into your mind going into the fifth set?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I was serving against the wind the first game.  Was 30‑15 up; he played couple good points; then, you know, 4‑2, to make a break, I didn't ‑‑ it was a bit lucky shot.  But, look, you know, that's sport.  You know, you are lucky; the opponent is lucky.  You can't affect that.  You try always to fight and give your best.  Fifth set was decided in first couple of games.

 

Q.  Not many people in Britain can remember the Fred Perry match in 1936.  You have to be I guess in your 90s to have any memory of that.  Do you think that the gold medal match for Andy Murray gave him the self‑confidence, the self‑belief that was the critical psychological issue for him?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  It's again a question for him, I think.  He's gonna answer better.  But from looking at it from the side, I mean, he definitely changed his mindset, I think, you know, towards the big matches.  I mean, he has won gold medal in his country.  A lot of expectations.  He has won it in a very impressive way in finals, so it must have been a great confidence boost for him.

 

Q.  I wasn't here for the first question.  When you played in Australia the long, long match, and this one, can you compare them?  Was this more difficult because of the wind?  Also, you were more tired then or today?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, you know, conditions are there, and you have to adjust as a player.  Both of the Grand Slams are played on hard court but obviously a different setting, a different conditions that you're playing.

 

Q.  The rhythm?  Everything?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Well, yeah.  I mean, as I said, it was obvious.  We had to make a lot of improvization with the shots.  We had to try to stay in there and stay focused and be in a good balance.  You know, the wind was doing everything to keep us out from balance.  So it was tough to play in.

 

Q.  That match in Australia he only had obviously started working with Ivan Lendl.  Now they have been working together for eight months.  What are the main differences that you see?  Is it mainly mental or is there a change in his game?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  I think it's mental in the end mostly.  He has maybe couple of adjustments in his game.  Maybe he goes for forehand more than he used to.  But, you know, he was he was always out there one of the best players to play in the men's game last couple of years.  It was always a challenge to any of us on any surface.  I think it was mental for him in the end to really, you know, make a breakthrough.

 

Q.  What's the key for you to get over this?

NOVAK DJOKOVIC:  Have days without tennis.

                       

     FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Offline sid

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #854 on: September 11, 2012, 01:42:46 PM »
Congrats to Murray! 

Of the big 4, he definitely has had the best year (Wimby final, Olympic Gold and US Open Slam).  Hopefully the rankings reflect that.

Thanks to all who have posted congrats,i had to sleep last night after the match.

Rankings are ATM.

Fed 11,805
Nole 10,470
Murray 8,570
Nadal 7,515
Ferrer 5,915

Offline phoneix

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #855 on: September 11, 2012, 03:30:50 PM »
din't you see how murray through out the first set tried the slice tactic and it paid dividends in the form of throwing novak off his rhythm........though his slice was punished a few times novak just doesn't like that shot........din't you also see how he rolled those forehands down the middle without trying to attack with it and kept it mostly to the middle of the court? he employed the rafa tactic there........i knew it was going to be one of those tactics.........
Murray barely made a slice backhand in the first set. The shot almost lost him the set.

Offline Start da Game

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #856 on: September 12, 2012, 04:33:14 AM »
that means you haven't seen the first set.......
Marian Vajda to Novak Djokovic, "I saw you beat that man like I never saw no man get beat before, and the man KEPT COMING AFTER YOU! Now we don't need no man like that in our lives."

i demand french open to be renamed RAFAEL GARROS

Offline no_1_djoko_fan

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #857 on: September 12, 2012, 11:06:37 AM »
Well done to Andy Murray for winning his first Grand Slam and beating Novak Djokovic. It was a match of the highest quality with the returning from both players out of this world. But physically and mentally Murray was better and deserved to win. He has been working hard for years for this moment and has proved his doubters wrong. One of the best finals I have ever seen, definitely in line with the Nadal/Federer one at Wimbledon.
"Sometimes it feels like you're not on a tennis court, the amount of noise you guys produce and for us it's a great feeling. It's a pleasure playing in front of you. It's my great privilege to be standing here in front of one of the greatest players ever, Rod Laver. "

Offline sid

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #858 on: September 12, 2012, 01:02:23 PM »
For me the key was playing good with the wind @ this Slam,i will never forget when he lost to Nadal when the wind was like this.Ivan Lendl has helped Murray big time & next he will try & become no 1 & who knows he might just get it.

Offline sid

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Re: OFFICIAL 2012 U.S. OPEN (MEN)
« Reply #859 on: September 12, 2012, 01:31:02 PM »

any body know how the rakings will be after this?

I am just guessing and you ask so; here goes:
 
 1.Novak Djokovic Serbia   
 2.Roger Federer Switzerland 
 3.Andy Murray Scotland   
 4.Rafael Nadal Spain   
 5.David Ferrer Spain   
 6.Tomas Berdych Czech Republic
 7.Juan Martin del Potro
 8.Janko Tipsarevic
 9.Jo-Wilfried Tsonga France   

Others I did not take the time to figure out at 10 and below!  Other then say that James Blake is at 102 and Donald Young is 122?

djokovic does not deserve to be at the top.......murray does........how funny that this year now belongs to murray as he won two prestigious prizes compared to one each of rafa, djoko and fed........

2012 belongs to murray by a slight margin........with fed having to defend truck load of points and djokovic looking very beatable everywhere, he should just go on a tear and finish the year no.1........he deserves it........he should target this period post us open where most of the players show up tired and there are 1000s of points to be collected........this is not the time to lose focus........he has a chance of achieving the top spot in a field of legends........make the most of it........

Thats a good point,2012 belongs to Murray & some here won't like this.The top 4 guys are very good,& it's so hard for one tennis player to stand out year after year.Murray had the hardest draw @ the USO & he won it,time will tell if he can keep winning??? if he does not it won't be a player outside the top 4.Potty & birdman might but if i had to bet i would not put my money onit ATM.