Author Topic: Tennis has a steroid problem  (Read 8941 times)

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Offline Alex

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #100 on: February 05, 2013, 08:37:43 PM »
What about that injury timeout by Nole at 2-5 in the fifth set at the 2012 USO final just before Andy was getting ready to serve for the match? How about that 2011 Cincy final where Nole retired in the 2nd set, when Andy was leading the match with a first set win and a couple of breaks in the 2nd? Nole then went on to win the USO in a week time. Begs the question, doesn't it?
the only things that beg is your ignorance. Murray, every time he loses a point, touches his back, his legs, his shoulders, make those moronic facial expressions, oh blisters ... the problem is Murray will never be as good as Djokovic, and that must hurt. It's a known fact that Murray beefed up because he is doping. Unfortunately, dope is not good enough, you need skills, and Murray has NONE.  ::))).  all he knows is push, push, grind. His mom Judy should buy him a decent FH for his birthday. very soon he'll be out of top 10  :gleam:.

Federer is da man. My second favorite player after Nole right now. I can only hope Rafa comes back healthy to teach that Scottish punk how tennis is supposed to be played.  :rasta:
« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 08:52:59 PM by Alex »

Offline propstoart

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #101 on: February 06, 2013, 01:22:00 AM »
Yes, Alex - Rafa had Andy's number most times. However, form will have a big say in whether the trend will continue.. Let's watch how the season evolves..
Muzza dominated Roger in the AO SF - like I've never see him do before {I missed the 2012 Olympics final}. He ended the match, I believe, with more F/h winners than Roger - who would have thunk that? It is safe to say that Muzza is confident he can outhit Roger, while tracking down Roger's groundies with ease. I can't say the same when Muzza plays Nole..

Offline sid

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #102 on: February 06, 2013, 07:24:56 AM »
What about that injury timeout by Nole at 2-5 in the fifth set at the 2012 USO final just before Andy was getting ready to serve for the match? How about that 2011 Cincy final where Nole retired in the 2nd set, when Andy was leading the match with a first set win and a couple of breaks in the 2nd? Nole then went on to win the USO in a week time. Begs the question, doesn't it?
the only things that beg is your ignorance. Murray, every time he loses a point, touches his back, his legs, his shoulders, make those moronic facial expressions, oh blisters ... the problem is Murray will never be as good as Djokovic, and that must hurt. It's a known fact that Murray beefed up because he is doping. Unfortunately, dope is not good enough, you need skills, and Murray has NONE.  ::))).  all he knows is push, push, grind. His mom Judy should buy him a decent FH for his birthday. very soon he'll be out of top 10  :gleam:.

Federer is da man. My second favorite player after Nole right now. I can only hope Rafa comes back healthy to teach that Scottish punk how tennis is supposed to be played.  :rasta:

Ok Alex lets see who's name is here,before i only added the link now i will show the lot.

Tennis Has a Steroid Problem
Taking a close look at doping control in professional tennis. How stringent is it? We also look at other issues related to the integrity of the sport.

Djokovic, Dr. Igor, and William Nelson (Updated #3)
Earlier this year, there was much ado about Novak Djokovic's remarkable physical improvement, starting with his victory at the Australian Open. The New York Times ran a piece about Djokovic that made numerous references to his team, including a Dr. Igor Cetojevic. Dr. Cetojevic is credited with uncovering Djokovic's apparent "gluten allergy" and helping out with the mental part of Novak's game.

The article notes that Djokovic indicated "that Cetojevic has played a significant and wide-ranging role in recent months." Djokovic is quoted as referring to Cetojevic as "a great psychologist" and a "great doctor."


The article also delves a little into Cetojevic's profile:

Cetojevic’s Web site says that he holds a diploma from the Indian Institute of Magnetotherapy in New Delhi and that he specializes in working with advanced biofeedback systems, including S.C.I.O., or Scientific Conscious Interface Operator, a device that measures 16 “standard electrical parameters of the body” in an attempt to detect and treat areas of stress or imbalance and can be used to help combat allergies.
Unfortunately, the article delves no further and offers no comment on the "SCIO" device. I find this odd, because on the face of it, the SCIO device described sounds, to put it politely, a little too good to be true. And the fact is, a little Googling should have resulted in a totally different story being written.

First, according to media reports, "Cetojevic said he used a SCIO bio-feedback machine - basically attaching some wires to a person and connecting them to a computer - to study the effects that food has on Djokovic's body. He saw that the gluten was "through the roof," and knew he needed to do something about it."
Let's take a look at Dr. Igor's webpage:

Who's William Nelson? That's a whole story in itself. Here's some excerpts from a 2007 article from the Seattle Times titled "How one man's invention is part of a growing worldwide scam that snares the desperately ill":


There are plenty of other sites about SCIO/QXCI/EPFX and William Nelson on the web, if one was inclined to spend a few minutes on Google.

Is it really possible that no tennis journalist could bother doing simple research? What does this say about the quality of reporting?

And what does this whole story say about Djokovic's judgement?

_________________________________________________________________________

UPDATE #1: Offered without comment. It's a promotional video for the "SCIO" device.

UPDATE #2:

A Canadian investigative journalism show did a feature on the EPFX/SCIO machine and went to Budapest to interview William Nelson. The interactions with Nelson are interesting, to say the least.

You would think the media would want to set the record straight on all of this, since they gave Dr. Cetojevic and the SCIO device a lot of free press this year. And, as for Djokovic's "gluten" problems, you'd think he'd want to get a second opinion, no?

UPDATE #3:

Found something else. It appears to be SCIO promotional material built around Djokovic's success this year.

This situation raises a number of questions:

1. Is Djokovic aware that he is being used to promote the SCIO device? I tweeted him the document and the youtube video. He hasn't responded.

2. Is the ITF aware of this stuff? I tweeted them, too. No response.

3. Is the ATP aware of this stuff? Tweeted them, too. No response.

4. Why is the media not reporting anything? The media has a public interest obligation to tell the whole story because it is possible that some people may have, or are thinking of, buying a SCIO device (or getting some treatment with one) because of the association of Djokovic.

5. Is the SCIO the only method used to diagnose Djokovic's gluten "allergy"?

6. What's up with Djokovic and devices? He's at two now: CVAC and SCIO.

Offline sid

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #103 on: February 06, 2013, 07:43:48 AM »
  According to Tennis has a steroid Problem Reading up, and looking at videos from the semifinals between Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic I am staring to wonder if there is some problems related todoping in the sport.
What the videos show are Djokovic eating something under a towel, while another video showing Murray getting some drink with something in it (and we can all see that something is being put into the drink).

Let’s take the Djokovic part first being winner of Australian Open 2012 and all: If what you are eating is OK accordingto WADA lists I don’t see any reasons why you should hide under a towel. And the commentators said: “hmmmmm…”
If you don’t have anything to hide – you just don’t hide it.
When asked if he had taken medication during the match the Serbian replied: “No, you try to get energised in every way. A lot of liquids, try to eat something as well, that gives you energy. We are competing on a very high level where each points goes to 10 and plus rallies. You have to expect that you have some ups and downs throughout the match.” (from The Sunday Telegraph)
About the Murray clip: It seems suspicious, and it is done so openly it is almost worrying – it is like they are all saying: We know that we are cheating, but we also know that they won’t trace this – or he won’t be tested.
According to Tennis has a steroid Problem, the players only gets tested when they loose their matches. I am starting to think that it maybe is a better idea to test the winners…
It is nothing new that athletes put something in their drinks. In cross country skiing it is quite common that the skiers has a strong caffeine drink near the end of the race. This to boost the body the last miles. When caffeine was on the WADA list of prohibited substances, a few athletes used this – and those who did was caught and sanctioned.
But I am still wondering what we saw in this semifinals. What was Djokovic putting into his mouth? And what did Murray get in his drink? When you also know that he was upset because he was to be doping tested – giving a sample of blood which in turn caused the doping sample collection to take 30 minutes longer than normal – something makes you start wondering.
I also read that there is an allergic problem in tennis. In an AFP article published on (probably among others) Sunday Nation, the Australian Open winner admits he was struggling with allergies during the semis – and he blamed the flowers in the arena.
 
I am hoping that there aren’t a steroid or doping problem in Tennis, but the actions taking place during the semifinals in 2012 does raise some questions.
 
from.
http://www.morningsidetenniscenter.com/according-to-tennis-has-a-steroid-problem/

Offline sid

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #104 on: February 06, 2013, 08:01:24 AM »
I cant help being a bit suspicious of Djokovic after hearing of this pod thing he has and seeing his vast improvment & with the above.

Offline Alex

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #105 on: February 06, 2013, 11:01:02 AM »
I cant help being a bit suspicious of Djokovic after hearing of this pod thing he has and seeing his vast improvment & with the above.
Sid, don't be silly.  Nole used the egg 2 times only and I assume he got big $$$ for that. than thing costs $75,000. Any top player can afford it, if is that good
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 08:12:19 PM by Alex »

Offline Clay Death

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #106 on: February 06, 2013, 12:00:48 PM »
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Offline Clay Death

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #108 on: February 06, 2013, 10:04:26 PM »
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Offline Gawdblessya

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #109 on: February 07, 2013, 02:47:14 AM »
The BBC reported on the Australian Governments comments about the abuse of banned drugs in sports in Australia. I heard it a few minutes ago & have found the following article. At least there ia a clear admission & the extent of it - from sportsmen to coaches to trainers & pharmacists etc - is sobering news. In the report I heard, vested interests & criminal interests were also mentioned.  Could there be some meaningful result in Australia as a result? who knows, but at least there has been an attempt to expose the truth & the extent of the problem.

The question is, if in Australia, why not elsewhere? Even the Fuentes trial, toothless though it is, has exposed this much - that abuse goes on across sports & has been in existence for years.   Now what?


Australian doping inquiry finds drugs rife in country's sport
Professional codes rocked by official findings that many athletes use illegal substances, sometimes supplied by gangs


Widespread doping and illegal drug use among Australian athletes has been alleged in a bombshell report by the country's Crime Commission (ACC).

The use of performance-enhancing drugs – in some cases facilitated by organised crime – was unearthed in a landmark, year-long investigation. In what's been described as a major blow to professional sport's integrity in Australia, the ACC found that the use of banned drugs had been "orchestrated and condoned" by coaches, sports scientists and support staff across multiple sporting codes.

The ACC found that crime groups were involved in the distribution of banned drugs including hormones and growth-hormone releasing substances called peptides.

"The findings are shocking and will disgust Australian sports fans," said Jason Clare, the national minister for home affairs and justice (video).

"It's cheating but it's worse than that. It's cheating with the help of criminals. We're talking about multiple athletes across multiple codes," he said

The ACC said crime groups had taken advantage of legal loopholes making it possible to supply substances that breach anti-doping rules. It said professional sport in Australia was "highly vulnerable" to infiltration by such groups.

"This is particularly serious. Links between organised crime and players exposes players to the risk of being co-opted for match-fixing," Clare said.

One potential case of match-fixing was identified by the ACC but it did not release details, citing legal reasons.

Clare said in some cases sports scientists had orchestrated the doping of entire teams. He said players were administered with drugs not yet approved for human use.

The Australian Sports Anti-doping Authority, Asada, has begun investigations into specific cases. When the story broke it declined to name individuals or clubs involved for legal reasons.

The former head of the Asada, Richard Ings, said it was a wake-up call for Australian sport. "This is not a black day in Australian sport, this is the blackest day in Australian sport" he told ABC TV.

"Peptides and other hormones are very serious performance-enhancing drugs and at the moment they are very difficult to detect through testing, so the only way to determine whether athletes are using them is through the coercive powers that have been employed by the Australian Crime Commission [like] witness statements, testimony, phone taps and other more traditional law enforcement approaches to identify who is doing what and when," he said.

The ACC report follows revelations on Tuesday that one of the country's top Australian rules football (AFL) clubs, Essendon, was being investigated by Asada over concerns that supplements, believed to be peptides, were given to its players in 2012.

The club admitted its players took supplements but would not say what was in them or how many players were involved. Essendon's coach, James Hird, said he believed the players were clean. ''The supplements our players were given, in my opinion and my knowledge, were all approved and within the regulations we all play the game by,'' he said.

Essendon's fitness coach, Dean Robinson, was suspended. He had previously worked at another AFL club.

Players face bans of more than two years if found guilty of using performance-enhancing drugs. It's thought that if the supplements were as widely used as feared at Essendon, the club may face difficulty fielding a team this season, according to some national newspaper reports.

In response to the ACC's report on doping in Australia, each of the country's major sporting codes, including soccer, rugby union and rugby league, Australian rules football and cricket have agreed to establish integrity units and to deal with doping, and have pledged to co-operate fully with Asada.

Commenting on the Australian scandal, the World Anti Doping Agency president, John Fahey, said the disgracing of Lance Armstrong had proven that a more comprehensive approach to catching sports cheats was essential. "The samples themselves are not the be all and end all as the Lance Armstrong case proved," he told the ABC.

"Lance Armstrong fooled the world for years and years and years. He had a system in place and resources to successfully lie his way through every accusation that was made against him.

"He was outed not by the samples he gave, and he gave many, but the evidence that was developed against him."

On Monday the US anti-doping agency gave Armstrong an additional two weeks to co-operate with its investigation into the use of drugs in cycling. Armstrong denied any involvement in doping before coming clean last month about taking banned drugs to help him win his seven Tour de France titles.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2013/feb/07/australian-doping-sport-drugs
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #110 on: February 07, 2013, 05:23:50 AM »
This isn't going to go well for tennis, is it? :( :mad1:
CONK da ball!!!

Offline propstoart

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #111 on: February 07, 2013, 06:08:03 AM »
Australians set store by their sportsmen and women. This will be a major blow to the world of sports, but also to the nation as a whole.  :Confused:

Offline euroka1

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #112 on: February 07, 2013, 07:57:24 AM »
The BBC reported on the Australian Governments comments about the abuse of banned drugs in sports in Australia. I heard it a few minutes ago & have found the following article. At least there ia a clear admission & the extent of it - from sportsmen to coaches to trainers & pharmacists etc - is sobering news. In the report I heard, vested interests & criminal interests were also mentioned.  Could there be some meaningful result in Australia as a result? who knows, but at least there has been an attempt to expose the truth & the extent of the problem.

The question is, if in Australia, why not elsewhere? Even the Fuentes trial, toothless though it is, has exposed this much - that abuse goes on across sports & has been in existence for years.   Now what?


Australian doping inquiry finds drugs rife in country's sport
Professional codes rocked by official findings that many athletes use illegal substances, sometimes supplied by gangs


Australian TV was on the boil about this today along the lines mentioned above. It is mostly about football but I was sorry to hear that tennis was also explicitly mentioned. There are two facets to it. First the illegal performance enhancing drug suppliers in which sports scientists have alleged links to organized crime. Secondly, the match betting and fixed matches. I've seen a couple of disappointing tennis matches when I've had my doubts as to whether fair competition is going on. Australia is a sports mad country and the government, facing an election  now, is giving it lots of attention. 

I could use some of the anti-ageing stuff myself  :( .

Offline Alex

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #113 on: February 07, 2013, 10:50:01 AM »
Sid, I was cynical about Murray and then you post 2 looooooooooooong posts accusing Nole of doping and talk all of this nonsense.  Dr. Cetojevic is not even a real doctor. He is a nutritionist. He helped Nole with his diet, which is completely different now than what it used to be. Plus, you have double standards. You are 'assuming' that Nole is doping but Murray is an angel and you don't even mention him in this discussion. If you assume that Nole is a doper, then I assume that Murray is doping too. got it?  :)>>>>. sometimes you are full of sh!t. sorry bud.

Offline Clay Death

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #114 on: February 07, 2013, 03:15:37 PM »
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #115 on: February 07, 2013, 07:07:38 PM »
Interesting statement to come now since the judge just ruled this out within the past 2 weeks!!!

Rafael Nadal: Athletes linked to Spanish doping case should be named

Quote
Rafael Nadal, in an interview with French sports daily L’Equipe (translated here), said all athletes implicated in the Operation Puerto doping trial in Spain should be named.

A judge in Madrid has ruled that Eufemiano Fuentes, the Spanish doctor suspected of running one of the largest doping rings in sports, does not have to disclose his client list. In addition to cyclists, Fuentes says he treated soccer players, boxers and tennis players.

Here’s Nadal:

    “What is happening in Spain, I don’t understand it,” he told the magazine.

    “I don’t understand why Dr Fuentes is not giving names. And I don’t understand why the judge has not asked him to do so...


more here
http://tennis.si.com/2013/02/07/rafael-nadal-operation-puerto-doping-case/#
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Offline propstoart

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #116 on: February 07, 2013, 10:43:25 PM »
Rafa: “I don’t understand why Dr Fuentes is not giving names. And I don’t understand why the judge has not asked him to do so... I don’t understand why we never get to the bottom of these things. We need to clean everything up. I believe this doctor has worked with foreign athletes but because he is Spanish it is Spanish sport that is being prejudiced."

Andy: “All sports – not just tennis – need to look very closely at this stuff because I think a lot has been learned from what’s happened with the Lance Armstrong situation and you don’t want that happening ever again. And I don’t want that happening for my sport because it would be terrible.”

Rafa is being smart or incredibly naive to be so uninformed about the goings-on about the biggest sporting doping scandal to hit Spain. The tentacles of Dr. Fuentes's drug operation penetrated many sports.. The judges have prevented the disclosure of athletes' names, claiming protection of privacy [I understand the need for this. However, this must be tempered by the implications of doping by some of the most high-profile, highly-paid athletes in the world!!]..

Muzza has a point - evidence has to be collected from any source possible because drug testing in sports has failed - Armstrong passed all tests!! He threatened, bullied and sued the whistle-blowers until he could no longer lie.. This is a battle for the soul of sport!

Online Babblelot

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #117 on: February 07, 2013, 10:51:55 PM »
The judges have prevented the disclosure of athletes' names, claiming protection of privacy [I understand the need for this. However, this must be tempered by the implications of doping by some of the most high-profile, highly-paid athletes in the world!!]..



Hmmm... I guess this wasn't an issue in the US (for instance), because no one went to Dr. Feelgood, instead, they just juiced themselves and one another. Very clever!

I'd like to hear what Rafa would say to Noah today...

Rafael Nadal upset at Yannick Noah
November 20, 2011

Quote
LONDON -- Rafael Nadal thinks Yannick Noah should be banned from commenting in the media after the French tennis great wrote a newspaper column accusing Spanish athletes of widespread doping.

Nadal reacted angrily Sunday when asked about Noah's claim in Saturday's edition of Le Monde newspaper that French athletes no longer had a chance against their Spanish opponents because they "don't have the magic potion."

"This guy deserve not (to) write anymore in the newspaper," Nadal said. "What he said is completely stupid."

Nadal, speaking at the ATP World Tour Finals, added that Noah's remarks were "totally stupid" because of the amount of doping tests conducted on athletes throughout the season.

He said Noah's thoughts were like those of a "kid."

Fellow Spaniard David Ferrer, who is competing with Nadal at the ATP finals, also condemned Noah's comments, as have Barcelona soccer coach Pep Guardiola and French Minister for Sports David Douillet.

Noah, the 1983 French Open champion, suggested that Spanish athletes were consistently more well-built than their French rivals and said they must be doping -- without offering any other proof.

"How can a country (Spain) dominate sport from one day to the next?" Noah asked. "Had they discovered avant-garde training techniques and methods that no one else imagined?"

Noah even proposed the idea that the French authorities should relax their rules on doping in order to keep up.

Nadal, a 10-time Grand Slam champion, said Noah's comments reflected badly on the former tennis star's home country, not Spain.

"The image of the country when one guy, important guy like him, say that, is terrible."




http://espn.go.com/tennis/story/_/id/7263074/rafael-nadal-angered-yannick-noah-comments-doping

 :rofl_2: :rofl_2:
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 10:53:56 PM by Babblelot »
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #118 on: February 08, 2013, 05:21:32 AM »
This is just plain ugly. :(
CONK da ball!!!

Offline sid

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Re: Tennis has a steroid problem
« Reply #119 on: February 14, 2013, 02:22:22 PM »
Czech tennis player Barbora Zahlavova Strycova has been given a back-dated six-month ban after testing positive for a banned stimulant.