Author Topic: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1  (Read 680 times)

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Offline sid

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Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« on: January 25, 2013, 12:29:23 PM »
World No. 3 Andy Murray can supercharge his chances of becoming the first British man to hold the No. 1 Emirates ATP Ranking should he win Sunday’s Australian Open final against Novak Djokovic.

As the reigning US Open and Olympic champion, and the 2012 Wimbledon finalist, Murray will have a mountain of points counting towards his ranking between now and the start of the grass court season if he can win a second consecutive Grand Slam title. During the same period, Djokovic and Federer will see more than 4000 points drop from their rankings, while Murray will lose just 1,620

Should Murray dethrone two-time reigning Djokovic in Sunday’s final, he will trail the Serb by 2,840 points and Federer by 985 points. (For reference, a player earns 2000 points for winning a Grand Slam title and 1000 points for winning an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title. Points count towards a player’s ranking for 52 weeks before ‘dropping’.)

The rivalry between Murray and Djokovic, born just a week apart, blossomed in 2012. They squared off seven times, with Djokovic tipping the scale with four wins. But Murray defeated Djokovic in the semi-finals of the London 2012 Olympics and went on to edge the Serb in five sets to claim his first major title at the US Open. As he takes the court in a Grand Slam final for the first time as a major champion, the Scot will be drawing on his triumph over Djokovic at Flushing Meadows.

“The task isn't any easier. I'm obviously playing Novak again on this court,” said Murray. “This has been his best court for sure. So I'm aware of how tough it will be to win the match and what have you.

“But hopefully there are moments in the US Open final where I could have closed out sets a bit quicker. I think the tie-break was a good example of how nerves can work in those sort of matches. It was not the prettiest tennis, so hopefully I'll play a little bit better

Offline Alex

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2013, 05:03:21 PM »
Sid, how about no. Murray will become #1 when he learns how to play on clay.

just messing with you bud  :)~

Offline sid

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2013, 05:26:59 PM »
Sid, how about no. Murray will become #1 when he learns how to play on clay.

just messing with you bud  :)~

Murray's after the no1 spot,i've a feeling it's going back & forth with Nole & Murray.I think Murray will take the Australian Open Final.Then Nole's going to take RG this time,i've a feeling Nadal won't be back to his best on Clay this year.I've also been messing with you on threads  :)) Murray & Nole are the true 1 & 2 ATM.@ the Australian Open i think Murray's playing the best this year,that 5 set match with Roger won't make a difference.I've a very big feeling this will be Murray's year,he want's it so bad & he is super fit.I reckon you could chuck a kitchen sink @ him & he would send it back over the net with interest :rofl_2:
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 05:29:29 PM by sid »

Offline Orange Wombat

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2013, 05:36:48 PM »
Annie will never get to the top while Djokovic is still playing. He is simply inferior in every way.

Offline sid

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2013, 05:38:16 PM »
Annie will never get to the top while Djokovic is still playing. He is simply inferior in every way.

Who's Annie :confused1:

Offline Orange Wombat

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2013, 05:40:35 PM »
Annie will never get to the top while Djokovic is still playing. He is simply inferior in every way.

Who's Annie :confused1:

Andy, excuse me  :)~ Typo

Offline sid

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2013, 05:59:48 PM »
Annie will never get to the top while Djokovic is still playing. He is simply inferior in every way.

You mean he's inferior just like @ the Olympic's & US Open,ah i see.When Andy wins the Final i guess your gonna hide up a tree  :)~  :rofl_2:

Offline jesse james

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2013, 12:24:04 PM »
Annie will never get to the top while Djokovic is still playing. He is simply inferior in every way.

Who knows, maybe the sun will come out tomorrow, to clear away those cobwebs and sorrow.
I am a lighthouse worn by the weather and the waves
And though I'm empty I still warn the sailors on their way

Offline HarryWild

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2013, 01:09:48 PM »
From Wall Street Journal

By TOM PERROTTA


There was no surprise, no celebration, no look of disbelief. Andy Murray had just beaten Roger Federer at a Grand Slam tournament for the first time, and it all seemed so…normal.

In Melbourne Friday evening, Murray confirmed the new order in tennis, with Novak Djokovic at the top, Murray close behind and Federer, who will turn 32 this year, and the injured Rafael Nadal several steps behind—and struggling to keep up. Murray can move even closer to the top if he defeats Djokovic, the world's No. 1 player, in Sunday's Australian Open final. (ESPN, 3 a.m. ET)

Andy Murray and Roger Federer in the men's semifinal of the Australian Open on Friday.

Murray, 25, had a breakthrough season in 2012. It started with a semifinal run—and a grueling, five-set, nearly five-hour loss to Djokovic—in Melbourne, followed by his first final at Wimbledon, where he lost to Federer. A month later, Murray beat Federer in the gold medal match at the London Olympic Games and then won the U.S. Open by defeating Djokovic in the final.

The most impressive aspect of Murray's 6-4, 6-7(5), 6-3, 6-7(2), 6-2 victory over Federer: From the first point, he looked like he expected to win, and when things went wrong, he kept plugging away rather than muttering, mouthing off and imploding, as he might have a few years ago.

"You want to be excited, but you don't want to go overly crazy," Federer said. "It seems like he has more peace when he plays out there."

And more weapons. Murray played well enough to win every set and actually served for the match in the fourth set. He hit more winners, more forehand winners and more aces than Federer and had fewer errors. Remember the player who reacted to his opponents and used their power and angles against them? He's still there, but only when Murray the pacesetter—the one who bruises opponents with his serve and forehand, like his coach, Ivan Lendl, used to do—has no time or room to operate.

Murray pushed Federer around and caused him to scoff and swear several times during the match, including one outburst directed at Murray (both players brushed it off after the match). To stay in the match, Federer had to take too many risks and play too brilliantly. It was unsustainable.

Murray's transformation under Lendl's tutelage has been much remarked upon. The best way to sum it up is: Murray no longer fools around in matches. The old Murray would try fancy shots at the wrong times and seemed too concerned with style points. This Murray tries to win points—all of them—and nothing more.

"The only thing you can do is play the right way, go for your shots when the opportunity's there, and hope that it pays off," Murray said.

It sounds easy, but it took Murray and Djokovic years to master it as Federer and Nadal piled up major title after major title. Djokovic, who is a week younger than Murray, came into his own in 2011, when he won three Grand Slam titles. Now that Murray has arrived too, men's tennis—blessed now for almost a decade—has much to look forward to.

Federer versus Nadal always offered contrast: Offense versus defense, righty versus lefty, pace versus spin. Djokovic and Murray have more in common, so their battles are defined by pain and elasticity. They will run, stretch and lunge for hours—all the while snapping back from defense to offense. As Andre Agassi, who will present the trophy in Melbourne to Sunday's winner, said of the Federer-Nadal-Djokovic-Murray era, "You never know when they're behind in a point."

Or for that matter, in a match, especially with Djokovic. In the fourth round, he won a five-hour, five-set match against Stanislas Wawrinka after trailing 6-1, 5-2. Since then, Djokovic has looked more and more formidable. (He lost five games in the semifinals against No. 4 seed David Ferrer.)

Last year's U.S. Open final was a wobbly affair with lots of errors and momentum swings. Murray won the first two sets, Djokovic the next two, and Murray the final one. He had never won a major before and his nerves were on display throughout the match. Djokovic, in contrast, looked tired from a long season that saw him fail to defend his Wimbledon title and lose his first French Open final. "It wasn't the prettiest tennis," Murray said.

This time should be different. Djokovic has waited a year for another major and he's coming off one of the most clinical performances of his career. Murray is playing like a man making up for lost time. Most important of all: There's no doubt anymore that these two men are the best in the game. They both know it—and they expect to play accordingly.

Write to Tom Perrotta at tom.perrotta@wsj.com

Offline HarryWild

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2013, 01:34:49 PM »
From SI:

Roger Federer flashes temper in loss to Andy Murray at Australian Open


Roger Federer lost his cool a few times in Friday’s match. (Daniel Munoz/Reuters)

 
Roger Federer wasn’t his usual cool self during a 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-2 loss to Andy Murray in the Australian Open semifinals on Friday.

As The New York Times reported, the television microphones picked up expletives from the 17-time major champion on multiple occasions.


[T]he BBC was compelled on Friday to apologize for Federer’s “bad language.”

Federer’s first clearly audible obscenity in his semifinal loss to Andy Murray came with Murray serving at 4-5, 15-30. Murray fired a body serve which Federer could just get his backhand in front of and sent him into mostly indistinguishable muttering, punctuated with a loud, hard expletive in the middle.

Federer’s second audible offense came with Murray serving at 3-4, 40-40, in the fourth set. Murray won a 17-shot rally, and Federer exclaimed that his opponent had been “lucky,” preceding that word with a choice adverb.

Popping off at the back of the court is one thing, but directing comments at your opponent is another. With Murray serving for the match at 6-5 in the fourth set, here’s how The Times described the first point of that game:

Murray prevailed in 15-stroke rally with a forehand winner, with both players finishing the point near the net. But Federer, on the brink of defeat, appeared to have taken issue with a slight mid-rally [hesitation] by Murray, and shouted “you [expletive]-ing stopped!” across the net. Murray appeared at first surprised, then amused, twisting his face into an exaggeratedly satisfied smirk, laughing and nodding toward his player’s box.

Here’s video of the point in question. Murray downplayed the incident after the match and refused to repeat what Federer said to him.

“I wasn’t that surprised,” Murray said. “Stuff like that happens daily in tennis matches. … It was very, very mild in comparison to what happens in other sports.”

Murray added that there were no hard feelings, saying, “People will want to make a big deal of it, and it isn’t really a big deal.”

Federer also downplayed the incident.

“It wasn’t a big deal,” he said. “We just looked at each other one time. That’s OK, I think, in a three-and-a-half-hour match. We were just checking each other out for [a] bit. No, I mean, that wasn’t a big deal for me. I hope not for him.”

Murray went on to lose the game and the set in a tiebreaker, but he dismissed the idea that Federer’s outburst had anything to do with it.

“I think it didn’t rattle me,” Murray said. “I think he raised his game, and that’s what happens. Sometimes guys need to get emotion into the match.”

Federer’s fire was short-lived. Murray broke early in the fifth set and won it in 30 minutes.

Federer, of course, was a hot-tempered player when he was younger, and he’s been known to have an outburst every once in a while....

Offline HarryWild

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2013, 01:35:54 PM »
From Tennis Statistics: http://tennisstat.blogspot.com/

Andy Murray d. Roger Federer (Australian Open Semi-Final 2013)


Andy Murray walked onto the court today with the confidence of a grand slam champion and played lights out tennis to send the 4 time Australian Open champion, Roger Federer, home. From the very start of the match, Federer seemed to have a bad day at office with things not working his way, but all the credit to Murray who pushed Federer, anticipated well and came out on top at the end.


Coming into the match, Federer had won 82% points behind his first serve but won only 73% in his semi-final match. He served at 61% and won only 42% points behind his second serve. Federer's serve which had been there in the first 4 rounds was not present there today.


Murray, on the other hand, did his part well, serving at 64%, and winning 75% points behind his first serve and backing it up with 63% points behind his second serve.


Where everything worked for Murray, nothing worked for Federer tonight, from his serve to his fore-hand, from his back-hand to his drop shot. Everything and every shot defied him. It was like Murray was playing Federisque tennis and Federer was playing Murrisque tennis.


Coming into today's match Murray had not won a match against Federer in 3 prior meetings, but it turned out to be 4th time lucky for Murray. Murray broke Federer to go up 2-1 in the first set and held the rest of the way to win the first set. The second set went all the way on serve till tie-break, where Federer showed his class and took the set in tie break to level the match at one set  a piece. Third set followed the pattern of the first set with Murray breaking Federer and holding his own serve till the very end.


Fourth set provided a lot of drama. Federer broke Murray to go up early, but Murray broke right away to bring the set back to serve. Serving at 5-all Murray broke Federer again to serve for the match, but nerves got the better of him as Federer broke him to force tie-break and once again the story of second set was repeated as Federer won the tie break to force a final set.


Murray started strong and broke Federer to go up 2-0 and held his serve to go up 3-0. Serving to stay in match at 2-5 Murray once again broke Federer to clinch the match and become the first man to make it to back to back grand slam finals after winning his first major. The final score being 6-4 6-7 6-3 6-7 6-2 in Murray's favour.


Murray hit 62 winners compared to Federer's 43, and hit only 47 unforced errors compared to Federer's 60. The winners-unforced errors differential says it all.


Federer goes home and will have time to think on things, while Murray moves on to face Djokovic in a U.S Open repeat final, won by Andy Murray. Andy Murray is closing on the gap between himself and Federer in the rankings and if he keeps the level going, Federer will soon be in trouble. However, on part of Federer it was great to see him stretch Murray to a fifth set, despite a bad day at office. All the credit to Murray for his master class performance.


To sum up the match, Murray did to Federer, what Federer used to do to Murray, giving him the taste of his own medicine.


P.S - I know all of you must be saying that this is biased report, I tried to keep neutral, but being a Federer fan, writing this report immediately after his loss is tough.
Posted by Omair Malik at 05:34

Offline Alex

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2013, 06:58:58 PM »
Harry, not sure what this has to do with Andy getting to #1.   :confused1:

Offline Alex

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2013, 07:03:59 PM »
the best post here is 'Annie Murray', love it  :rofl_2:.

Annie Sid, how it goes? this is your aunty Annie Alex  :rofl_2:.

Offline HarryWild

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2013, 08:46:29 PM »
Harry, not sure what this has to do with Andy getting to #1.   :confused1:

Shows that Andy got over another bump to becoming number one!  Andy has never won against Federer in a grand slam before - ever!  Just a checklist of things to accomplish on the road to becoming number one.  Andy can check this one off.  If he wins the final; he will be closing in on being number one.   Not sure if he is now number 2 or not however. 

Offline Alex

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2013, 10:16:18 PM »
Harry, not sure what this has to do with Andy getting to #1.   :confused1:

Shows that Andy got over another bump to becoming number one!  Andy has never won against Federer in a grand slam before - ever!  Just a checklist of things to accomplish on the road to becoming number one.  Andy can check this one off.  If he wins the final; he will be closing in on being number one.   Not sure if he is now number 2 or not however.
Mandy needs more points to get to #1. he is still far behind. Sorry Sid  :)

1 Djokovic, Novak (SRB)    12,920    0    18
2 Federer, Roger (SUI)    10,265    0    20
3 Murray, Andy (GBR)    8,000    0    20

If he wins this morning he'll gain some points, Nole will lose some but it's not even close ... Andy even with the win can't overtake number 2. simple math  :). I can try to explain the ranking system but you can google it. it's not that difficult.

Offline HarryWild

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Re: Murray Making Major Strides For No. 1
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2013, 11:00:59 PM »
Alex,

After tomorrow the next points and ranking will come out for the men's.  The last revision was on the 14th of January 2013!  Maybe Andy will not make it to number 2 but he will be just shy of it if he does not become number 2!