Author Topic: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis  (Read 1522 times)

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Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2013, 05:48:06 AM »
The Open Era had just begun and already a few players were set to make history at their debut. As the first US Championships of the Open Era are set to debut, Laver and Rosewall will dispute their number 1 status once again. The average system is going to be key in deciding the new leader.

Laver's status is compromised once he faces Drysdale in the round of 16. Although he's leading by 2 sets to 1, Laver is defeated eventually with a double 6-1, and his early exit awards him only 3 points and since the average is by 4, decreases his average, since US Open is his 5th tournament of the year. Rosewall manages to get in front of him simply by getting into the quarterfinals, since he played less tournaments that year and proven himself as a more efficient player.

Drysdale ended his run at the US Open in the next match though, as he faced Ashe. The afro-american beat him in 4 sets, and, already a favorite at winning the trophy, advanced to the semifinals. In another quarterfinal, Graebner defeated Newcombe in another 4 set match and secured his previous 4th position in the Open Era rankings. Rosewall got in an even better position as he straight-setted Dennis Ralston 6-2 6-2 6-3. This victory secured his 11th week as the Open Era World Number 1. In perhaps the most interesting quarterfinal of the tournament, Okker faced Pancho Gonzales. The first epic set is won by the veteran by 16-14, but he is unable to retain his momentum and is eventually overtaken by 6-3 10-8 6-3. Okker secures his match against Rosewall.

The two semifinals are equally interesting as both finish in 4 sets. The match between Ashe and Graebner, ending 4-6 8-6 7-5 6-2 in favor of Ashe is described in the book Levels of the Game, by John McPhee. In a few words, the psychology of the game goes like this:

Quote
The African-American Ashe, who shows a calm demeanour on court, has a mercurial game. If Ashe is on song, he would go for the impossible angle and make it look easy. He is a rhythm player, prone to make errors playing the obvious shot. McPhee ties Ashe's game to a liberal political outlook.

Graebner is not as gifted as Ashe, and seeks to trumph through single-mindedness and persistence. If the tide is against him, Graebner displays a volatile temper on court, directing his ire at umpires, linesmen and spectators. Graebner is the conservative, devoted family man, oblivious to the world. He says in Levels of the Game that he does not have any friends in tennis.


Although already ahead of Laver in the US Open, Rosewall's match against Okker ends with the Dutch player winning 8-6 6-4 6-8 6-1. Okker controlled most of the match and manages to improve his average, being the player in the Open Era Top 10 with the most tournaments played.

The final is one of the best of the first year in Open Era history. After an epic first set ending 14-12, Okker manages to come back 7-5. The next three sets end 6-3 3-6 6-3 in favor of Ashe, making him the first afro-american Open Era Grand Slam winner. As far as the final goes, I found this clip on youtube for your enjoyment:

US Open 1968 final (The video's owner prevents external embedding)


Ashe moves in the third position pushing both Okker and Newcombe lower in the rankings. The average system, as the main rankings system of the pre-1990 times, is key into deciding the leader, despite the fact that Rosewall has less points than Laver. It's now basically impossible for Laver to regain his top position until 1969. Rosewall is going to be Year-End #1 in 1968.

Pictured is the winner of the first US Open:



The two finalists:

Offline masterclass

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2013, 06:32:50 AM »
Amazing stuff Sir Slasher!  Thanks again for your efforts.

Respectfully,
masterclass
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Offline Clay Death

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2013, 04:40:50 PM »
fantastic.
 
 
what a spectacular body of work by general slasher.

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2013, 04:15:13 AM »
Two more open tournaments remain in 1968, one in the US and one in South America.

In Los Angeles, the two best players of 1968 fight in the final. As Rosewall has managed to get in this final, he secured his top rank position once again against his main rival. Laver is triumphant though with an incredible 6-4 0-6 0-6, despite the fact that Rosewall secured his final position by ousting the local favorite Ashe in straights. No major changes in the Top 10, except for Roche pulling in front of Newcombe.

The other tournament is played in November 1968, in Buenos Aires, and is a 8-Draw. Due to the impossibility of ranking more than 4 players, no 8-Draw tournament will ever be considered for ranking before 1990, and this rule was surely implemented in the case of Finals after the Grand Prix was created and WCT was enforced with a tour. The post-LA rankings are YE rankings for 1968.

We can clearly see that it was an extremely close battle, with Rosewall edging it out by only .133 points. Laver actually score 7 more points and is the main reason why some tennis followers back then considered him as the best of 1968. Even after the computer rankings appeared, the player having the most points (disregarding averages) was considered the winner of the Grand Prix.

1968 Year-End rankings:
Code: [Select]
# Player Name Age Cnt Pts Trn Avg
1 Ken Rosewall 33 AUS 39 5 7.800
2 Rod Laver 30 AUS 46 6 7.667
3 Arthur Ashe 25 USA 26 4 6.500
4 Clark Graebner 24 USA 22 4 5.500
5 Tom Okker 24 NED 29 7 4.143
6 Tony Roche 23 AUS 16 4 4.000
7 John Newcombe 24 AUS 18 5 3.600
8 Pancho Gonzales 40 USA 17 5 3.400
9 Dennis Ralston 26 USA 12 4 3.000
10 Cliff Drysdale 27 RSA 17 6 2.833

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #24 on: June 04, 2013, 03:50:18 AM »
After such an interesting 1968, we're bound to see new surprises in 1969, especially considering the well-known history of tennis about this year. The point system will stay the same, because it was also implemented in 1970 by the GP. It will be the last year consisting of 4p for the winner tournaments, and the first to award 11p to a winner for a specific tournament. Since the number of open tournaments has grown, 1969 is going to have a minimum of 8 average that will be implemented after AO, in preparation for the full minimum of 12 average that was applied at the start of the computer rankings, and that we will apply beginning with the GP.

Here is the calendar for countable tournaments in 1969:

10K 30.12.1968 Hobart 32D
25K 20.01.1969 Australian Open 64D
50K 05.02.1969 Philadelphia WCT 32D
10K 24.03.1969 New York WCT 16D
25K 01.04.1969 Johannesburg WCT 64D
10K 14.04.1969 Monte Carlo 64D
25K 21.05.1969 Rome 128D
TC 28.05.1969 Roland Garros 128D
25K 16.06.1969 Queen's 128D
TC 23.06.1969 Wimbledon 128D
25K 14.07.1969 Cincinatti 128D
25K 21.07.1969 Indianapolis 64D
10K 28.07.1969 Gstaad 32D
10K 04.08.1969 Hilversum 32D
10K 11.08.1969 Toronto 64D
25K 11.08.1969 Hamburg 64D
TC 25.08.1969 US Open 128D
25K 20.09.1969 Los Angeles 64D
25K 29.09.1969 Las Vegas WCT 16D
25K 06.10.1969 Barcelona 64D
25K 27.10.1969 Stockholm 32D
25K 03.11.1969 Paris 32D
10K 11.11.1969 Buenos Aires 32D
50K 18.11.1969 Wembley 8D - Despite it being an 8-Draw, it is one of the prestigious tournaments of the Pro Era, a regular Pro Slam, and the prize money offered was enough for it to count among the best tournaments of the year. Only the best 4 will be getting ranking points.

Be ready for when the episodes will continue.:)

Offline Clay Death

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2013, 07:27:23 AM »
 :)) :))

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2013, 05:11:12 AM »
After a successful start of the year in minor tournaments, Fred Stolle (winner of rankable Hobart) and Tony Roche (winner of unrankable Sydney) were heading for the first Australian Championship of the Open Era.

The usual rivalry of 1968 is going to be skipped this year, as Rosewall has an early exit in front of Spanish player Andres Gimeno. Although not ranked among the Triple Crown events, Australian Open is still a Grand Slam and still holds the prestige of winning. It is with this lesser of the Grand Slams that Laver's path to the Calendar Year Grand Slam starts. His first two victims are Italian Massimo Di Domenico and Australian Roy Emerson.

The Quarterfinals of the tournament are filled with Australian players (6), but there is one match between an American and a Spanish player. Gimeno is the victor of said match in 3 short sets against Buchholz. In the other three matches, Ruffels came back from 0-2 to win the match in an epic 5 set clash 9-11 2-6 6-0 6-3 6-4, Tony Roche defeated John Newcombe in another epic 5 setter 10-8 4-6 6-8 7-5 6-3 and Rod Laver defeated Hobart winner, Fred Stolle in 3 sets one of which going to 18-16.

In the first semifinal, Gimeno has an easy pass to the final, as Ruffels is defeated in 3 sets 6-2 11-9 6-2. But it is the other semifinal that goes on as one of the most epic clashes of 1969. The first two sets are grabbed by Laver with 7-5 and an incredible 22-20. Admirably, Roche fights back to win the 3rd and 4th 9-11 and 1-6, but Laver triumphs in the end with a 6-3 in the decisive set. You can actually admire for yourselves this epic clash:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FquHcwZByWE

The above match was the true final of the event, as Gimeno is easy prey in the final for Laver 6-3 6-4 7-5. The trophy and first Grand Slam of the year are his:


In the end, Laver makes it back at World Number 1, Gimeno rockets back into the Top 10 at #5 and Ashe moves back one space to #4 to give Okker the 3rd position once again.

Offline masterclass

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2013, 05:03:29 AM »
Sir Slasher, I didn't see this '69 AO Laver-Roche match at the time.  I only remember watching Wimbledon and the US Open majors that year.

Thanks very much for posting the match.  Nice description of events.  Eagerly awaiting the next installment. :)

Respectfully,
masterclass
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Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2013, 03:28:51 AM »
Very glad that you enjoyed it so much, John. One of the most important matches of the early Open Era, that may have determined Laver's rise in 1969. Stay tuned as there's much more to come. :))

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2013, 07:43:03 AM »
The Roche-Laver Australian confrontation was just beginning. They were to meet again and their rivalry was about to increase further. The next stop in our exploration of tennis history is the first open event on the World Championship Tennis tour. The main event, which was held in Philadelphia had a cashout even better than the Australian Open, ranking it even higher, despite not being a Grand Slam event. The WCT tour, birthed in 1967, and held in 1968 for the first time at Kansas City, was growing in 1969. Their ideas concerning applauding players, giving them colored clothes and a higher prize money pot in order to create a larger attraction for the circuit was working out quite well.

The main event, held in Philadelphia in 1969 and called the US Pro Indoors was played by a best out of 3 system, with a final best out of 5.

The semifinals bring on battles between the 4 best players of the moment, and eventual Top 4 after this week. Laver faces off against Rosewall and Roche against Okker. Although, 1968 has created a true rivalry between the two, Laver easily dispatches Rosewall this time 6-4 6-2. Roche deals in a similar fashion with Okker 6-1 6-4. The final is set, but this time, things fall into Laver's hands much easier, and it all ends in straights, 7-5 6-4 6-4 in favor of Laver.

Laver takes a significant distance in front of the pack, while Roche jumps to the 4th position. Ashe had a disappointing tournament this time, losing in the first round in front of Jan Kodes. The player from Czechoslovakia and the Brazilian Thomas Koch are new additions to the rankings, are we're approaching 100 players.

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2013, 02:08:12 PM »
This will continue from New York WCT (which is now in the OP). We've had the first 49 weeks of the Open Era. The rest will follow soon.

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2013, 02:26:16 AM »
OPEN ERA IS ONE-YEAR OLD

As the first WCT tour was under way, Laver and Roche will dispute matches, creating one of the greatest tennis rivalries of the Open Era. Their first meeting in this calendar section would be Miami, unranked because of the fact that it was an 8-Draw. Roche is the winner of the Miami final by 6-3 9-7 6-4. They would meet again at the beginning of March in another WCT event at Oakland, Roche winning again, this time 4-6 6-4 11-9. After this, with Roche not participating at the next event, Laver wins Los Angeles WCT while Roche gets ready for the larger draw of New York.

The New York WCT finds Roche defeated in the semifinal by Gimeno. Gimeno would eventually win the tournament after a long final against Ashe, 6-1 6-2 3-6 6-8 9-7. However, even this earlier defeat is enough to put Roche on the third world spot. Gimeno gets the 6th after the tournament.

Laver was already on his way towards the more prestigious WCT event in Johannesburg, stretching across 2 weeks, from April 1st to April 12. The two semifinals there would be pitting against each other Laver vs Drysdale and Roche vs Okker. Roche's activity in recent months has taken its toll and he is forced to withdraw due to an injured shoulder, Okker advancing into the final. Laver's match against Drysdale plays 4 very-short sets 6-1 1-6 6-1 6-2. Okker doesn't manage to win any set in the final, and Laver consolidates his top position once more.

Finally, on the 52nd week of the Open Era, the first edition of the Monte Carlo Open is held, with a prize money pot of only $5000. Okker is top seed and wins the tournament from this pole-position spot, 8-10 6-1 7-5 6-3 against Newcombe. Newcombe's final here takes him to the 6th spot, while Okker drops one position as his average has enough lower-tier tournaments.

The top 10 on the Monday of the first anniversary of the Open Era are:
Code: [Select]
# Name Age Cnt Pts Avg
1 Rod Laver 30 AUS 73 8.111
2 Ken Rosewall 34 AUS 45 5.625
3 Tony Roche 23 AUS 36 4.000
4 Arthur Ashe 25 USA 30 3.750
5 Tom Okker 25 NED 44 3.667
6 John Newcombe 24 AUS 24 3.000
7 Andres Gimeno 31 ESP 33 2.750
8 Clark Graebner 25 USA 22 2.750
9 Cliff Drysdale 27 RSA 21 2.625
10 Richard Pancho Gonzales 40 USA 24 2.400

And here are the streaks at World Number 1 until now:
Code: [Select]
1. Ken Rosewall - 29.04.1968 - 10 weeks
2. Rod Laver - 08.07.1968 - 9 weeks
   Ken Rosewall(2) - 09.09.1968 - 21 weeks
   Rod Laver (2)* - 03.02.1969 - 12 weeks

Offline mimi

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2013, 02:36:44 AM »
 :worthy: your knowledge and ability to do good research is just unbelievable, hard to believe that you know so much by your young age.

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Offline FedFanForever

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2013, 02:43:58 AM »
This is an amazing project, keep up the good work.
Then we will fight in the shade.

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2013, 06:12:59 AM »
ENTER NEWCOMBE

As tournaments begin to drop out for players, gradually adjusting their averages, the Australian domination of the beginning of the Open Era is set to add a new name to the list. Already having the top three spots in the world rankings, and a fourth player in the top 10, they are ready to take on the first edition of the Rome Open, future prestigious tournament of the tour.

Newcombe's road to the semifinal is easy enough, the young Australian dropping only one set. On the other side of his semifinal, there is Jan Kodes who faced tougher opposition against local player Pietrangeli than seeded top player Roger Taylor and Arthur Ashe. On the other semifinal, Tom Okker (who faced off against Tiriac and Stolle conqueror, Stillwell for this spot) will face none other than the top seeded player (in Laver's and Rosewall's absences) Tony Roche.

Both semifinals end up in epic 5-set grueling wins for the two Australians, Newcombe winning by 6-3, 4-6, 6-1, 7-9, 6-3 and Roche by 4-6, 4-6, 7-5, 12-10, 6-3. The all-Australian final will see Newcombe as victor and again in a 5-set clash, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3. It's Newcombe's second counted open tournament win, yet he also won the second edition of Bournemouth, and 8-Draw tournament.


The top 10 on the Monday just before Roland Garros now are:
Code: [Select]
# Name Age Cnt Pts Avg
1 Rod Laver 30 AUS 67 8.375
2 Ken Rosewall 34 AUS 37 4.625
3 Tony Roche 24 AUS 36 4.200
4 Arthur Ashe 25 USA 30 3.875
5 Tom Okker 25 NED 44 3.692
6 John Newcombe 24 AUS 24 3.556
7 Cliff Drysdale 27 RSA 21 2.875
8 Clark Graebner 25 USA 22 2.750
9 Andres Gimeno 31 ESP 29 2.636
10 Richard Pancho Gonzales 41 USA 23 2.556
« Last Edit: August 01, 2013, 06:51:53 AM by Slasher1985 »

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2013, 04:45:14 PM »
LAVER'S REVENGE

The second edition of the French Open is going to give us a chance to see a new edition (this time with different result) of the final between Laver and Rosewall we had in 1968. The two Aussies are at it again, with the third Aussie, Roche taking advantage rankings wise.

Laver and Roche are top seeds. Surprisingly, Laver almost loses this part of history, which we all know today as TOTAL DOMINATION to Dick Crealy. A tough 5-set match that shapes Laver for the rest of the tournament. Gimeno's road to the quarters goes through Manuel Santana, and his abandon before the end of the match after leading 2-0 at sets and having Gimeno come back. In another quarter we have Newcombe - having just defeated Kodes after a 5-set match that went astray in the third set when Jan won 6-0, forcing a tough 4th set ending in 10-8 - and Tom Okker fresh here without dropping a set. Another quarter pits together Fred Stolle - who easily dispatched US Open Champion Arthur Ashe - and the defending champion, Ken Rosewall, now seeded 3rd. The final quarter sees second seed Tony Roche against Franulovic, who's coming after a victory against another Australian (of the so many), Roy Emerson.

In the quarters, Laver drops the first set, but quickly recovers to advance in the semis against Gimeno with the score 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Newcomer Newcombe almost deals with Okker, but the Dutch comes back twice to win the match in the final set, 5-7, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2. After a very close first set and a lost second set, defending champion Rosewall advances in the semi, dealing 12-10, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2 against Stolle. The last spot is taken by Tony Roche 4-6, 7-5, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1 against Franulovic.

Laver quickly dispatches Gimeno to get ready for the final, 4-6, 6-0, 6-2, 6-4. Rosewall has a surprisingly simple task against Roche. For those wanting to make an idea on how this match was played, video highlights are available here:

Tony Roach vs Ken Rosewall - French Open 1969 Semi Final [Highlights]


Laver's "revenge" comes swift. Rosewall is not able to win a set against him, unlike the previous year when Rosewall lost a set. You can also watch Lavel win the whole thing in a quite impressive manner right here:

Legendary Rod Laver vs Ken Rosewall Roland Garros 1969 Final


We can't complete this without the traditional picture of the happy winner:



The top 10 on the Monday after Roland Garros now are:
Code: [Select]
# Name Age Cnt Pts Avg
1 Rod Laver 30 AUS 72 9.000
2 Tony Roche 24 AUS 49 4.455
3 Ken Rosewall 34 AUS 32 4.000
4 Tom Okker 25 NED 55 3.929
5 Arthur Ashe 25 USA 34 3.778
6 John Newcombe 25 AUS 37 3.700
7 Clark Graebner 25 USA 22 2.750
8 Cliff Drysdale 28 RSA 23 2.556
9 Andres Gimeno 31 ESP 27 2.455
10 Fred Stolle 30 AUS 24 2.182

Offline mimi

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2013, 11:41:02 PM »
 :thumbs-up:

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Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #37 on: August 05, 2013, 07:15:47 AM »
LAVER'S DEFENSE

Australian tennis continues it's full domination of the early Open Era. Soon after Roland Garros, Aussies dispute the final at the Queen's event. More than that, there's three of them in the semis. On one side, Newcombe defeats Laver and on the other side, Fred Stolle defeats Ralston. In the end, Stolle will claim the title, helping himself to a better rankings position. All is set for Wimbledon 1969, with Laver defending for the title.

Laver and Roche are top seeds once again. Roche takes a perilous road to the quarters, as he has to battle Queen's semifinalist Dennis Ralston. The 5 set match eventually ends up with Roche winning. On his quarter comes Clark Graebner, one could call a lucky player, benefiting from 2 retirements (one by Gimeno) and winning against inexperienced Nastase for his spot. Although he looks like easy prey, Clark will be tough meat against Roche, as the Australian will again be forced to end a match after 5 sets, 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 11-9, coming from 2-0 down. One another quarter, Okker will be facing the winner of the Queen's final re-edition, decided by another match between Stolle and Newcombe, this time won by the younger Australian. Okker can't stop Newcombe either, and one semifinal is set to be all-Australian after 8-6, 3-6, 6-1, 7-5.

On the other half of the draw, Ashe defeats veteran Pancho Gonzales to claim his quarters position, and he will be facing another American, who, surprisingly, defeated Ken Rosewall, and won his previous match in 5 sets. Probably to tired to continue in the same manner, this surprise quarter-finalist, Robert Lutz, is defeated by Ashe in 4 sets, 6-4, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5, although it still was not as easy as it looked. His toughest match though was against Stilwell, which surprisingly has a few highlights:

1969 Ashe vs Stilwell


Ashe breaks the all-Australian deal in the semis, as the last one is obviously Laver, having easily obtained the spot against Cliff Drysdale (6-4, 6-2, 6-3). Laver had two tough matches though, one against Stan Smith (ended in 5 sets), and one against Premjit Lall, an anonymous Indian, where he had to come back from 2-0 down, 3-6 4-6 6-3 6-0 6-0.

Newcombe continues his splendid form for this year and defeats Roche, 3-6, 6-1, 14-12, 6-4. This victory, no matter the outcome of the final will be placing John on the second spot in the rankings. In the other semifinal, Ashe manages to get the first set, but is powerless to stop the Rod from shining in the end, 2-6, 6-2, 9-7, 6-0. It has been throughout this tournament that, whenever Laver had a comeback, he eventually won sets at 0. Well, it was not a rule, he only done it 3 times.

Although the final's outcome is probably predictable, Newcombe provided a tougher challenge, but was eventually forced to admit Laver's superiority. Highlights:

Rod Laver vs. John Newcombe (1 of 2) (The video's owner prevents external embedding)

Rod Laver vs. John Newcombe (2 of 2) (The video's owner prevents external embedding)



The new rankings for after this event can be checked here (direct link): RANKINGS 07/07/1969

Offline Slasher1985

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Re: Full Open Era Rankings ~Volume I~ Dawn of Open Tennis
« Reply #38 on: August 05, 2013, 12:37:51 PM »
THE MASTER IN SUMMER

Having dominated this year so far, Laver has provided himself with a comfortable lead in front of his competition. Not that he knows about it though, all he knows is that he won 3/4 Slams and there was one more to come, which he needed to win. Concentrating himself only on small WCT events, he rarely plays during this summer, letting us witness the other players at work:

07-13 July
The Master plays and wins Boston in front of the rankings runner-up, Newcombe. This is Laver's last tournament for one month. Much needed rest to come. Manolo Santana defeats Tiriac and wins Bastad. Bob Hewitt easily overcomes Pillic to win Dublin. This week is not counted in the rankings, per 1969 previously established rules.

14-20 July
Cincinnati doesn't yet attract so much attention. Besides Ashe, we don't see any of the Top 10 players of the world attending. Cliff Richey routines Allan Stone in the final and wins a few points helping him rise a bit in the rankings. In the other small tournaments of this week, Okker wins in Milwaukee and Emerson wins in Aix-en-Provence.
RANKINGS 21/07/1969

21-27 July
Ashe find himself again competing in the American main competition, this time being Indianapolis and this time reaching the final, but he's unable to win against Franulovic. Franulovic closes in on the Top 10, and Ashe on Newcombe.
RANKINGS 28/07/1969

28 July-04 August
Emerson stays in Europe to play in Gstaad, and the finalist he's facing is Okker, who flew off from Milwaukee to compete here. Not much changes in the rankings this week, but Emerson's win in Gstaad gets him in front of Franulovic and Richey, making a trio battle for Top 10.
RANKINGS 04/08/1969

05-11 August
This is Okker's week as he wins the Hilversum tournament, in preparation for the Hamburg European Summer main event. Roger Taylor is the player he faced in the final.
RANKINGS 11/08/1969

12-18 August
Two paths have lead to this week. The players who stayed in the US had the privilege to play for the 7500 dollar pot in Toronto. Newcombe is the main seed in Canada, but is unable to reach the final, being beaten by Buchholz. The other finalist and eventual winner of the tournament is Richey. Now Richey wins the small trio competition he had against Franulovic and Emerson and gets in front. In Europe, Tony Roche wins a tougher final against Okker 61 57 86 75 and overtakes both Newcombe and Ashe as the world number 2.
RANKINGS 18/08/1969

19-25 August
This week serves as warm-up for the US Open, and our main players compete in Fort Worth WCT. Laver wins the final against Ken Rosewall and is ready to complete his Grand Slam collection.
RANKINGS 25/08/1969