Author Topic: Jerzy Janowicz  (Read 5304 times)

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Offline Clay Death

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2013, 08:49:27 PM »
great idea. we needed a jerzy thread.
 
 
 
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Offline Clay Death

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2013, 08:49:40 PM »

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2013, 03:51:54 AM »
Bellucci vs Janowicz R2 Miami 2013 Highlights

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #23 on: June 15, 2013, 12:57:22 PM »
https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?v=138500629677246&set=vb.468389506563907&type=2&theater

Verrückter Jerzy Janowicz:
Training auf der Autobahn

Der Weltranglisten-22. vertrieb sich die Zeit im Stau einfach mit einer kleinen Tennis-Einheit mitten auf der Straße.



 Im Stau zu stehen, das zählt wohl sicherlich zu den langweiligsten Momenten im Leben eines Autofahrers. Außer man nützt die Zeit sinnvoll. Das hat etwa Jerzy Janowicz in diesen Tagen gemacht: Der Pole, der bei den Gerry Weber Open in Halle/Westfalen am Dienstag bereits in der ersten Runde ausgeschieden war, funktionierte die deutschen Autobahnen kurzerhand zur persönlichen Trainingsstätte um. Der 22-Jährige bewies damit seinen Sinn für Humor – und erntete bestimmt viele Lacher, überraschte und ungläubige Blicke seiner in der Blechkolonne gefangenen Mitmenschen. Und trotzdem: nicht zur Nachahmung empfohlen… ;)
 
 
 


 
 
(Text: MaWa; Foto: facebook)

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2013, 07:56:28 AM »
Jerzy Janowicz (POL) v Grigor Dimitrov (BUL)

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2013, 03:02:53 PM »
One of the pleasures of Wimbledon is being able to see, up close, the stars of the future, without the need to beg, buy or steal a Centre Court ticket.

Follow game-by-game coverage as Andy Murray attempts to reach the third round with a victory over Yen-Hsun Lu

Eight years ago Novak Djokovic made his Wimbledon debut out in the boondocks on Court 19 while Roger Federer's first appearance was on court six, where a single row of benches line either side of the court.

The unticketed cognoscenti headed for court 12 where the Polish No.1, Jerzy Janowicz, was taking on Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic. Just 18 months ago Janowicz skipped the Australian Open as he could not afford to attend a tournament he would have to qualify for, but he is now a Grand Slam seed.

His rise to 22 in the world follows victories over players of the calibre of Andy Murray, Jo-Wilfred Tsonga, Richard Gasquet and Marin Cilic.

Up close, barely five feet from the tramlines, you could feel the speed of Janowicz's 130mph first serve, see the kick of his slower serve, and hear Stepanek feet pound the turf as he sought to reach a drop shot. This close, close enough to see the crease on his shorts were so sharp they were either fresh from the packet or the hotel laundry, the 6ft 8in Janowicz's formidable size was obvious.

In the first round he bludgeoned aside British teenager Kyle Edmund – who noted Janowicz had become more powerful since moving up from the juniors - in the first round. Yesterday he started equally imperiously against Stepanek winning an early break to take a 4-2 first set lead. The Czech then needed an extensive time-out for treatment on what appeared a thigh or knee injury only to drop his service upon resuming and losing the first set 6-2.

Janowicz, who mixes up the power play with plenty of drop volleys, played at his own pace, frequently calling for the towel while Stepanek waited to serve. This was most apparent in the seventh game of the second set when he broke serve. Janowicz subsequently held to take a 6-2, 5-3 lead at which point Stepanek, who continually flexed his ailing limb, called it quits.

The Court 12 crowd were disappointed but, maybe in a couple of years' time, when the Pole is on Centre Court, they will be able to say in that superior way, 'of course I saw him on the outside courts, before he made it big.”
http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/wimbledon-2013-court-12-offers-chance-to-see-jerzy-janowicz-up-close--one-of-stars-of-the-future-8675077.html

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #26 on: June 28, 2013, 09:51:21 PM »
Key Points Analysis: Jerzy Janowicz Dominates on his Centre Court DebutBy Juan José on June 28, 2013
 [img=19,19]http://w.sharethis.com/images/check-big.png[/img] [img=19,19]http://w.sharethis.com/images/check-big.png[/img]
 


Jerzy Janowicz’ Centre Court debut at Wimbledon got off to a rather unusual start. Even though the weather forecast was glum, the Wimbledon officials decided to open the roof over Centre Court after the previous match ended. Then, as Janowicz and Almagro started to warm up, a light drizzle started to fall on tennis’ cathedral.

The court wasn’t covered, and the players were told to sit on their chairs and wait. Moments later, they resumed their warm-up, only to be interrupted again by some more light rain. This time the Pole and the Spaniard were told to head back into the locker room…but the court wasn’t covered, nor the roof closed. Minutes later, the pros were out on the court again, but only warmed up for a couple of minutes before starting in earnest.
Given all that, it really wasn’t surprising to see Jerzy Janowicz start the match in rather sloppy fashion. However, after falling down 0-3 in that opening set, Jerzy Janowicz shook the nerves off, got the break back, and started holding serve without issue.
A tiebreaker looked likely, and it seemed that the match was heading in a similar direction than the one both men played in Melbourne at the start of the year (Almagro won 7-6, 7-6, 6-1). Turns out, only the first set appeared to follow that tune.
Still, since their Australian Open match was decided by very few instances, I decided to keep track of all Key Points (Game Points, Break Points, Set Points and Match Points) in this match. Not surprisingly, the numbers tell an interesting story. Here are the highlights:
[align=center][img=291,313]http://www.changeovertennis.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/2013-06-28_1726.png[/img][/align]- As you can see, Janowicz had a significant edge (+15) in Key Points won.
- Also notice the very high percentage of Key Points won via Point-Ending Shots (Aces, Winners, Service Winners and Forced Errors) by both players. This shouldn’t be surprising: both play with a rather aggressive style. Still, it’s interesting to see how well they executed said aggressive play for the most part today.
- It’s an incredibly positive sign for Janowicz that he only handed Almagro 4 Key Points via unforced errors or double-faults (3 of those were on his own serve – more on that below). As we see, Almagro handed Janowicz twice as many.
Now, onto other ways to look at the data:
- 13 more Key Points were played on Nicolás Almagro’s service games than Janowicz service games. That’s quite a significant edge, and a rather unexpected one: it means the trenches of this match were firmly in Almagro’s service games. And you don’t want the trenches to be so firmly stuck in your own direction, for the simple reason that it means you’re having way more difficulty holding serve than your opponent.
So why was this unexpected? Some of you might recall that I’ve often criticized Janowicz for his slightly below average return of serve. And since Nicolás Almagro already gave Jerzy fits in Australia (the Pole didn’t create a single break point in the entire three-set match), I honestly thought we’d see 3 or 4 tiebreakers today. And after the first set ended, it seemed I was right: Almagro fired 13 aces to Janowicz’ 9.
However, that was not the case in sets 2 and 3. Janowicz kept his service groove going, but he really turned the screws on his return of serve: Almagro went from 13 aces in the first set to just 1 in the second. The Spaniard would only add four more aces in the third set.
The small tables below also explain the positive Key Points differential in favor of Janowicz, as well as why so many more Key Points were played in Almagro’s service games than Janowicz’:
[align=center][img=201,122]http://www.changeovertennis.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/2013-06-28_1737.png[/img][/align]Notice for a moment how hilarious it is that Jerzy Janowicz won more Game Points than Almagro when the Spaniard had opportunities to hold serve with his ATP-Ace-Leading delivery. And also notice how dominant Janowicz was on his own Game Points.
In fact, Janowicz was 13 for 13 in Game Points converted, all the way until 2-3 in the third set, when he dropped two straight (via a volley unforced error and a double-fault). Holding serve so efficiently had to give the young Pole a lot of confidence, as well as being utterly demoralizing for Almagro, who only managed to create a single break point in Janowicz’ service games…and it was the chance he converted in the second game of the match.
[align=center]*****[/align]The next round should be intriguing for Janowicz: Jürgen Melzer is an experienced veteran, but crucially, a better returner of serve. And while Almagro certainly has a more frightening serve than the Austrian, he is left-handed, so that makes it ever so trickier for Janowicz. And the 22 year-old is only 1 and 4 lifetime against lefties.
It should be a fascinating match, with a Wimbledon quarterfinal berth at stake. Neither man has made it that far at Wimbledon (Janowicz hasn’t made it this far at any Slam, actually).
Manic Monday can’t come soon enough.
Bonus TracksI found this fascinating:
[img=316,381]http://www.changeovertennis.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/2013-06-28_1801.png[/img]
All the Key Points won by Jerzy Janowicz on his own serve were due to Point-Ending shots. Moreover, 75% of them were either aces or winners. That’s called playing the game on your own terms.
Slightly amusing: Almagro could never really “win” a Key Point on Janowicz’ serve: all 3 of them were errors on the Pole’s part.

 - See more at: http://www.changeovertennis.com/key-points-analysis-jerzy-janowicz-dominates-on-his-centre-court-debut/#sthash.izxG5uHi.dpuf

Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2013, 10:19:15 PM »
Good stuff WC7.
 
Jerzy really was professional today in putting a whipping on Almagro.
 
He had to fight the whole match as Almagro was pretty tough and served damn well.
 
Just a few months ago Jerzy would be losing his cool, maybe it was that he knows it was a prime match and he behaved himself for the occasion.
Anyway, he was cool about his play and was thinking out there.
 
He's showing some rapid maturity, maybe he can see how poor it was to go off the boil, it accomplished nothing and took him off his game.
 
 

Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #28 on: June 28, 2013, 10:25:26 PM »
I think the 4 areas that most players can use improvement are the serve (as you mentioned), ROS, footwork, & fitness.
The serve alone is so under-utilized in today's game that it's appalling and I'm not even talking about the WTA! :scared:
Perhaps the key to Jerzy's success in the future is building the right support team that has a solid plan for his development

Not a better point could be made.
 
The player can only so so much, if his energies are put in the wrong direction it will really stunt his progress.
 
 

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #29 on: June 30, 2013, 07:51:18 AM »
"Jurek is not a machine!" - interview with Kimi Tillikainenem, Jerzy Janowicz's coach and captain of the Finnish Davis Cup team, living in Poland.
 
Thu, 05/17/2012 - 20:54. |  admintennis.







What do you feel when two of your players compete against each other on one hand Jerzy who you
 
coach on daily basis and Henri Kontinen who is part of Finnish team? What did you feel during the
 
Davis Cup matches? I believe it’s a hard one?
 
 
 
This was the most uncomfortable situation I have faced in my coaching career. I did resign from
 
Captain position day before the match so I was not sitting on the court. That was never even an
 
option. Anyhow, I did sit with Finnish team behind Henri´s bench but I was not cheering for either of
 
them.
 
 
 
Did you take advantage of Jerzy’s weak points as you know him so well?
 
 
 
Absolutely not. I have not told Henri how he should play against Jerzy or what are the weak points
 
(or strengths) in Jerzy´s game.
 
 
 
Would it make any difference if Poland had Kubot, Przysiezny or Gawron in their team? If Yes
 
how different?
 
 
 
Who knows. It is true Poland was unlucky this time with injuries but I also think Poland played
 
some good tennis against Finland. Finnish team had no injuries, we played front of our home ground
 
and all the Finnish players were in top form. Bad luck for Poland. Now Poland has to forget this
 
match, look to the future and not to speculate about the past.
 
 
 
What do you think about H. Kontinen? Would he become even better tennis player if not his
 
injuries?
 
 
 
Yes, I do believe he would be playing on higher level right now if he would have stayed healthy.
 
I think he has the game and personal qualities that you need to have to become a top player. Last 3
 
years he has been able to play less than 18 months because of his injuries, so it is quite normal the
 
ranking is not on the level where it could be.
 
 
 
What’s Finnish tennis like at the moment? Any new stars about to come up?
 
 
 
I am not really the right person to asnwer that so I don´t want to pretend I know something about
 
it. I live in Poland and I know much more about Polish players than I know about Finnish players. I
 
have heard there are some good up coming players in Finland but until they are potential Davis Cup
 
players I will not take a look at them. Truth is that I just don´t have time to follow Finnish junior
 
players right now.
 
 
 
Can you tell me what’s your opinion about polish tennis players and what’s Poland like as a
 
country to produce ones?
 
 
 
For my opinion Polish players overall are very talented, good-athletes and they have hard-working
 
attitude. Poland has produced already some great tennis players, but without taking credit out from
 
anyone I believe these individuals has become top athletes mostly because they were naturally such
 
great talents and athletes.
 
 
 
What’s like to work with Jerzy? What’s your further plans regarding him? What do you need to
 
change in his game? What’s your short and long term goals with Jerzy?
 
 
 
Jerzy has not reached his potential yet but we all develop physically and mentally in our own
 
way. Some players play their best tennis when they are teenagers and some later. Jerzy is not a
 
machine that you switch on in the morning and switch off in the evening, but when he feels good, he
 
is mentally hungry and motivated he can do some serious damage. He is more like a player that you
 
just never know what kind of day he will have and what kind of match he will play. In one hand this
 
is the beauty of his personality and the game. I also prefer to coach a player like this anyway, because
 
you always know he can beat whoever he will play against if the day is right. Of course he needs to
 
get more solid with his results and learn to win on bad day as well but I think Jerzy will be the player
 
who is so called ``seasonable`` player. He will have some bad weeks and even some bad months, but
 
when he will shine then he is the player that nobody wants to play against. We all just have to wait
 
and see when he is ready for his big success. That day will come though, I guarantee that.
 
 
Rest of the year Jerzy will play indoor Challengers and ATP tournaments in Europe. Goals are
 
mostly about his game style and finding the right mental stage. We don´t really have any ranking
 
goals. When he finds his right mental stage and understands his game style then his ranking will go
 
up very fast.
 
 
 
What do you think about Poland as a country? What do you like and dislike in Poland? Do you
 
have your favorite Polish dish? Is there any dish you can recommend from finish cuisine?
 
 
 
Polls are good, warmhearted and caring people. I love living in Poznan and I see myself living in
 
Poland the rest of my life. Nevertheless, I do hate the language, I would rather study Chinese. It is
 
such a complicated language that I often think if Polish people even knows what they are saying. I am
 
also not a huge fan of Polish either Finnish food. I do miss pastries, liquorice and other sweets from
 
Finland but there is no such Finnish dish I could recommend or I would like to eat this moment.
 
 
 
What other activities you have been involved in before you started coaching Jerzy?
 
 
 
I started coaching tennis 2004 and until now my career includes coaching various Polish players
 
(Filip Urban, Robert Godlewski, Jakub Nijaki, Przemyslaw Lesniewski and Krzystof Muzalewski
 
just to mention some). I also worked 2.5 years as Head of men´s professional squad at Sutton Tennis
 
Academy, UK and I have had the honor represent my country as Captain of Finnish Davis Cup
 
Team past 4 years.
 
 
 
What’s the nearest tournament plans for Jerzy and why did you choose those tournaments?
 
 
 
Right now we are in Rennes, France. He is playing a Challenger tournament here. We thought
 
this was the good tournament to start the indoor season.
 
 
 
Can you explain Jerzy’s poor performance at the U.S Open?
 
 
 
Each Grand Slam includes around 250 best players in the World and every one of them knows
 
how to play this sport. It is not necessary poor performance to lose in qualifying. Jerzy did have some
 
problems with his foot for 7 days before the match and it could have effect his form a little but all
 
credits for opponent. The opponent played well and deserved the win this time.
 
 
 
What’s missing in J. Nieminen’s game so he can win against Djokovic, Nadal, Federer?
 
 
 
Those players above are one of the best sportsmen ever born. They don´t really have any
 
weaknesses and pretty much all of their strokes are weapons. Jarkko has played on top level for over
 
decade, he has great results and he has beaten many top players including Djokovic. Jarkko has the
 
heart of the lion and he is one of the biggest fighters in tennis but to win a Grand Slam he would need
 
to improve little things all around his game. It is not just one stroke (even though his serve is letting
 
him down sometimes) but it is more like improving those little things.
 
 
 
Have you got any suggestions for Polish tennis coaches, which they can accommodate when they
 
train youngsters? Do you think there is something missing, or what can be done better?
 
 
 
I think it is important for coaches to focus a lot on technique with young players and get rid
 
of bad habits at early age. These are the things that are difficult to change when player gets older.
 
For my opinion coaches sometimes follow results too much when coaching young players instead of
 
seeing the big picture and the future. If you work on right things and even if it would take time, be
 
patience - everyone will receive the present one day in the future.
 
 
 
Who’s your role model when it comes to tennis coaching?
 
 
 
I do not have any role models. I do not like copying anyone either. I want to improve my coaching
 
skills, learn from my coaching mistakes and have new fresh ideas but I do not want to follow some
 
other coach´s way. I want to coach the way what kind of person I am and I believe in my way of
 
coaching. It is more important to understand, analyze and feel the player than rather idolize some
 
other coach. Practice should be based on what player needs or should work on. Every trill and
 
exercise on court/fitness should serve the player and the coach (and the player) should know why it
 
is necessary to do those. You shouldn´t do trills/exercises (without understanding them) just because
 
you have seen some other coach to do those. But again, this is just my coaching view.
 
 
 
How long do you think N. Djokovic will stay world’s no one? What makes him extraordinary?
 
 
 
Well, it´s hard to say how long Novak will keep on going like this. It can be few more years or
 
maybe his good run has come to an end already. If you just look at the history of tennis there has
 
always been somebody dominating. My guess is that Andy Murray will be the next World´s no 1
 
after Novak. Maybe even already next year.
 
 
 
Dolgopolov, Roanic, Young, Tomic or maybe Janowicz, who do you think will have a chance to
 
join world’s top rankings?
 
 
 
I don´t know what is considered as World´s top rankings. I believe all those other players except
 
Jerzy are there already and I truly believe Jerzy will join them when he is ready to do so. How far all
 
these players can climb up on the ranking list, only time will show.

 
 
Who’s your favorite player and why?
 
 
 
Jarkko Nieminen. He is the greatest guy you will ever meet. He has kept his feet on the ground
 
through his whole career no matter of his tennis results. I respect him a lot.
 
 
 
What do you think about tennis coaching around the world, which one you think is the best -
 
Czech, American, French, or Spanish?
 
 
 
All of the countries above have produced great players and they surely have good coaching
 
knowledge, but you can´t compare the countries. I think the player who is looking to practice abroad
 
should first think how she/he wants to play tennis and then pick the country where she/he thinks they
 
have the best knowledge of coaching her/his way of playing tennis.
 
 
 
Agnieszka Radwanska – what’s your opinion about her game? Do you think she’s got a chance to
 
reach top 5?
 
 
 
I think she is more like a smart player rather than powerful player which is nice add to current
 
powerful women´s tennis. She kind of reminds me of Hingis. I do believe she has the potential to
 
become World no 1.
 
 
 
What are your thoughts about this year’s U S Open, where you surprised about the results?
 
 
 
Every Grand Slam has some surprises and normally in every Grand Slam we see somebody
 
breaking through.
 
 
 
Do you think there are too many tournaments in the season, leaving players being too exhausted?
 
 
 
Yes, I do. Many players say it should be their decision how many tournaments they want to play but
 
it is not entirely true. This system serves the players who play more and it is wrong for my opinion.
 
I think ATP/ITF should look more after their players, change the system and also from their behalf
 
try to keep players healthy by not letting them play too many tournaments. I would change it the
 
way that you count only the best 14 tournaments instead of current 18 tournaments and you can play
 
maximum 28 tournaments per calendar year. This way the level of tennis would get better as well
 
because players would have better preparation for the tournaments and they would be healthier. For
 
doubles it could stay as it is now because with current no-add and 3rd set match tie-break system,
 
doubles is not as physical as it was few years ago.

http://www.love4tennis.pl/en/content/jurek-not-machine-interview-kimi-tillikainenem-jerzy-janowiczs-coach-and-captain-finnish
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 07:57:47 AM by williamchung7 »

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2013, 08:01:07 AM »
I think the 4 areas that most players can use improvement are the serve (as you mentioned), ROS, footwork, & fitness.
The serve alone is so under-utilized in today's game that it's appalling and I'm not even talking about the WTA! :scared:
Perhaps the key to Jerzy's success in the future is building the right support team that has a solid plan for his development

Not a better point could be made.
 
The player can only so so much, if his energies are put in the wrong direction it will really stunt his progress.
By the way, who are in Jerzy's support team?

Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #31 on: June 30, 2013, 10:40:25 AM »
I think the 4 areas that most players can use improvement are the serve (as you mentioned), ROS, footwork, & fitness.
The serve alone is so under-utilized in today's game that it's appalling and I'm not even talking about the WTA! :scared:
Perhaps the key to Jerzy's success in the future is building the right support team that has a solid plan for his development

Not a better point could be made.
 
The player can only so so much, if his energies are put in the wrong direction it will really stunt his progress.
By the way, who are in Jerzy's support team?

There's some stern looking guy that never smiles. I don't know about the rest.
 
Until he makes some good money he can't bring too many.

Offline Orange Wombat

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2013, 04:24:39 PM »

 
 
Jarkko Nieminen. He is the greatest guy you will ever meet. He has kept his feet on the ground
 
through his whole career no matter of his tennis results. I respect him a lot.
 

 
 


http://www.love4tennis.pl/en/content/jurek-not-machine-interview-kimi-tillikainenem-jerzy-janowiczs-coach-and-captain-finnish


 :)

Offline Orange Wombat

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2013, 09:07:48 AM »
 :)>>>> :)>>>>

Jerzy into first semifinal?

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #34 on: July 01, 2013, 11:03:47 AM »
Jerzy Janowicz Ready to Rise Above the Rest

June 30, 2013 By Nick Nemeroff 1 Comment


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Jerzy Janowicz at Wimbledon
 
(June 30, 2013) Grigor Dimitrov, Milos Raonic, and Bernard Tomic have been commonly touted as being the next generation of great champions. If the ATP World Tour was a movie, these three men are believed to be its future leads.
 
While I do agree these three players have voluminous potential, I believe one young man—Jerzy Janowicz—is ready to rise above them all.
 
Let’s take a closer look at the 22-year-old Pole’s game to see what separates him not only from the young stars of the ATP World Tour but also from the other giants of tennis.
 
The most glaring aspect of Janowicz’s game is his imposing serve, which he unloads with herculean strikes and in the process prevents his opponents from grasping even the slightest glimpse of the ball. Janowicz delivers his devastating, heat-sinking missile of a serve from a soaring height. At 6”8’, the Pole is not only one of the tallest players on tour but is actually one of the few players that is able to look over the net and see his opponent’s baseline (you must be 6”7’ to do so).
 
Janowicz’s serve of course comes with much power but it also possesses ample variation. On the deuce side, as was demonstrated in the Paris Indoor Masters last fall, Janowicz is able to slide his racket head across the outside-edge of the ball producing a side-spin serve that not only moves out and away from his opponents but also lands short in the box making it nearly unreturnable. In terms of his second-serve, Janowicz is able to torpedo up the back of the ball and produce uncanny amounts of topspin making it more of a weapon than a starting shot.
 
Many big men on tour such as John Isner, Milos Raonic, and Kevin Anderson can absolutely crank their serves and are able to hold quickly and often. This is all fine and dandy until you realize that winning every set in a tiebreaker is not only an unrealistic expectation but really the last thing anybody wants to be doing. Unfortunately enough, this is what a lot of tall guys on tour end up having to do because they simply cannot break serve.
 
No shortage of individuals have correctly pointed out that big men on tour often find themselves retreating and backtracking on second serves to give themselves more time to set up and execute the return. This puts them into highly defensive positions and exploits their poor movement.
 
The explanation I find more revealing of the poor returning of big men is much grimmer: These guys have inadequate reactionary prowess and will probably never be anything more than average returners because they need more time than is allotted to hit meaningful returns. If you examine a player like John Isner, you’ll find out quickly that he loves running around his backhand and taking massive cuts on his forehands—granted he has time. Milos Raonic is much the same in that while he may be a big ball striker, he thrives when given time and often crumbles when rushed. This necessity for time during rallies extends to the return of serve.
 
Janowicz, unlike several of his towering contemporaries, takes a fearless and aggressive stance when returning serve. Against Andy Murray in Paris last year, Janowicz was almost standing on top of the baseline for first serve returns and was inside the baseline on countless second serve returns. Needless to say, Andy Murray’s serve is no pushover. Janowicz is able to establish such a proactive return stance for multiple reasons. One, Janowicz has speedy reactions and is able to anticipate and pick up on where his opponents are serving. Secondly, Janowicz’s forehand and backhand do not have protracted swing paths thus when returning, he is used to producing the abbreviated swings needed to deflect back powerful serves.
 
Speaking of Janowicz groundstrokes, the Pole’s forehand and backhand are undoubtedly some of the flattest strokes on tour. Janowicz drives through the ball with low-margin, enterprising and authoritative linear strikes. Janowicz’s forehand grip is also one of the most extreme on tour. He uses a full eastern grip approaching a continental grip which helps to explain the flat nature of his groundstrokes. Despite Janowicz’s groundstrokes being very high-risk, he is able to stay in elongated rallies because his swings are short and simple thus he is not going to be breaking down mechanically when under pressure.
 
The commanding power Janowicz possesses is beautifully contrasted by his out of world feel. The tennis world was shocked when the big man started pulling out the most deft and well-timed of drop shots in Paris last fall. This feel is translated to his net play which is assisted by his extremely long wingspan.
 
I would also be remiss to exclude the fact that Janowicz possesses absolutely shocking movement for a guy of his height. His court coverage and all-around speed are unbelievable and frankly unprecedented for a guy of his stature.
 
Ultimately, if you compare Janowicz’s game to the other young phenoms on tour, it becomes evident the Pole’s game has more dimensions. He has more weapons on court than any of the other young talents and certainly can do more than almost all of the big guys. I could go on and on praising the ability of this guy, but I think he’d prefer to prove how good he is on court.
 
As we head into the second week of Wimbledon, Janowicz is two matches away from a likely semifinal encounter with Andy Murray. If Janowicz does end up facing Murray, expect the Pole to display his full repertoire of shot making backed by a supreme level of confidence for Centre Court on Friday.
 
Don’t look now, but a week from today, we could very well be watching Jerzy Janowicz step on to Centre Court as a Wimbledon finalist.

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2013, 11:04:23 AM »
Result: Jerzy Janowicz through to last eight


 
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By Liam Apicella, Features Editor
Filed: Monday, July 1, 2013 at 15:03 UK
Last Updated: Monday, July 1, 2013 at 16:38 UK

Poland's Jerzy Janowicz booked his place in the quarter-finals of Wimbledon this afternoon thanks to a 3-6 7-6 6-4 4-6 6-4 victory over Jurgen Melzer.

Janowicz has been tipped to go deep at SW19 this year, but it appeared that he may have been heading for an early exit when Austrian Melzer claimed the opening set.

However, the Pole responded to win through 7-1 in a tie-breaker, before claiming a single break of serve to take the third set.

Melzer rallied again though and just one break of the Pole's serve meant that a deciding fifth set was required to determine a victor.

It went the way of Janowicz, who broke Melzer midway through to seal his route through to the last eight, where he will face either fellow countryman Lukasz Kubot or Adrian Mannarino.

Offline Lugburz

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #36 on: July 01, 2013, 11:44:04 AM »
 :thumbs-up: :thumbs-up:
In the absence of light, darkness prevails!
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Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2013, 11:01:51 PM »
Jerzy has a very good chance of getting to the SF's by beating fellow countryman Kubot.
He'll move up pretty well in the rankings and this will be a very nice check.
 
His parents sold their store to pay for his tennis training when he was starting out, they will all be living very nicely I have a feeling.
 
 

Offline Clay Death

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #38 on: July 02, 2013, 01:08:35 AM »

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #39 on: July 02, 2013, 04:07:28 AM »
Jerzy has a very good chance of getting to the SF's by beating fellow countryman Kubot.
He'll move up pretty well in the rankings and this will be a very nice check.
 
His parents sold their store to pay for his tennis training when he was starting out, they will all be living very nicely I have a feeling.


http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/11/01/us-tennis-men-masters-janowicz-idUSBRE8A01D420121101
Emotional Janowicz goes all out in search for sponsors

 Poland's Jerzy Janowicz celebrates after winning his men's singles match against Britain's Andy Murray during the Paris Masters tennis tournament November 1, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Benoit Tessier

By Julien Pretot

PARIS | Thu Nov 1, 2012 3:12pm EDT

PARIS (Reuters) - A few years ago, Jerzy Janowicz's parents sold their shops and apartments so that their son could play professional tennis.
On Thursday, Janowicz started to repay their faith with a barnstorming performance that left U.S. Open champion Andy Murray red faced in the third round of the Paris Masters.

"It's not easy for me to talk about this week because I had really tough moments in my life and this is really like a movie for me," the 21-year-old Pole, who also beat Marin Cilic and Philip Kohlschreiber in Paris, told a news conference following his 5-7 7-6 6-2 win over the Briton.

Asked to elaborate, world number 69 Janowicz took a sip from an energy drink and paused for some 20 seconds and said: "Well, I had problems in my life. First of all, I have always had problems with sponsors.

"I didn't have money for my career; all the time my parents were helping me. They were selling their shops, they were selling the few apartments, so they decided to go all in to help me as much as possible."

Janowicz had other problems, but he would not say more.

"This is the problems actually I can tell you," he explained.

The son of two former professional volleyball players, Janowicz picked up his first racket while he was still wearing nappies.

"When I was like two years old I was running already with a tennis racket on the court," he said.

"I couldn't basically hit one ball but I was holding this racket all the time."

Becoming a professional tennis player is no easy feat and Janowicz is well aware of that.

"I just would like to have few days off to think about what happened this week, because this week is really not easy to take for me because I'm from Poland and I know it's not easy to become professional tennis player," he said.

While no one would have blamed Janowicz if he had decided to paint the town red in celebration following his unexpected win on Thursday, the Pole has more pressing concerns. He is still looking for a sponsor.

"I have problem with sponsors. I was fighting my whole life with money, so this week is really important for me to get some sponsors, to get some help," he said.

Janowicz will face eighth seed Janko Tipsarevic for a place in the semi-finals and Murray warned the Serb to expect some more fireworks from the Pole.

Like most tall players on the circuit, Janowicz is a big server, having already served at 251 kph. However, he is not just a one-weapon player.

"He is maybe a little bit more unpredictable than a few of them from the back of the court," said Murray.

"He tried a lot of dropshots and went for winners maybe when he was out of position that maybe some of the others don't."

Janowicz, who has been working with a fitness coach since the beginning of the season and has changed his racket, is not looking for excuses anymore.

"My behaviour on the court is also a little bit different. I decide not to give up, whatever the situation," he explained.

"I'm fighting right now for every single ball. Doesn't matter if I feel good or not, if I have good day or week. I'm just trying to play my tennis."

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/wimbledon/10153942/Wimbledon-2013-Jerzy-Janowicz-reaps-reward-for-enduring-poverty.html
Wimbledon 2013: Jerzy Janowicz reaps reward for enduring poverty
It was only 18 months ago that Jerzy Janowicz was unable to take part in Australian Open qualifying because he could not afford his plane fare.
 
Star Pole: Jerzy Janowicz sinks to his knees in celebration after defeated Jurgen Melzer Photo: GETTY IMAGES
 By Jonathan Liew, at Wimbledon
10:00PM BST 01 Jul 2013
1 Comment
Despite finishing runner-up in both the French and US Opens as a junior, he was ranked No 221 in the world and was struggling to attract a sponsor. Money was so tight that his parents were forced to sell their chain of sport shops to keep him afloat. Sometimes he would sleep in his car while playing tournaments.

Now, the 22-year-old from Lodz in Poland is one of the stars of Wimbledon fortnight, a grand-slam quarter-finalist for the first time. The 24th seed beat Austrian veteran Jurgen Melzer in five tight sets – 3-6, 7-6, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 – to set up a last‑eight match against compatriot Lukasz Kubot.

The Poles have not had a men’s grand-slam quarter-finalist since Wojtek Fibak in 1980. Now, for the first time in their history, they have two, along with Agnieszka Radwanska in the ladies’ singles. “It’s unbelievable,” Janowicz said. “This is by far the best thing that possibly could happen to Polish tennis. What is going on is magical.”

Poland will come to a standstill on Wednesday. Andy Murray will likely be watching, too. He would meet the winner of that match in the semi‑finals.

The progress of Kubot, a dour, attritional clay-courter whose can‑can victory celebration is comfortably the most interesting thing about him, is more surprising. But it is the journey of Janowicz, an extremely tall, extremely gifted, extremely temperamental man‑child, that is by far the more arresting.

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When he was a junior, for example, he was offered the chance to wave away his money worries for good by taking Qatari citizenship. “I actually said no straightaway,” he said.

Besides, he always knew he had a rare talent. He modelled his technique on Pete Sampras, his attitude on Marat Safin. He shot up to a height of 6ft   8in and developed the fearsome serve that remains his most potent weapon. Yet for several years after his junior breakthrough, his career stagnated.

He needed to play tournaments to generate cash. But he needed cash to play tournaments. At US Open qualifying a couple of years ago, it is said that Polish New Yorkers chipped in to buy him a pair of shoes.

His breakthrough came at last year’s Paris Masters, where he beat five top-20 players in a row – including Murray – on his way to the final. Since then, his rise up the rankings has been vertiginous as his growth spurt.

Though he boasts the fastest serve of the tournament (140mph), Janowicz offers much more than brute force. His drop shot is beautifully disguised and his sliced backhand a potent weapon on this surface. If his fitness holds, he could cause Murray quite a few problems.

He is one of the grumps of the tour, too, his on-court dissent measuring somewhere in between a Premier League footballer and a man attempting to resist arrest. After an almighty strop at this year’s Australian Open, in which he thumped the umpires chair and threw his water bottle over a series of questionable line-calls, he resolved to control his emotions on court.

On Monday’s evidence, he was either lying or joking.

Within the first hour of this match, he had harangued a line-judge (“You have only one line to watch, it’s not so complicated!”), slipped over twice, sent three balls over the perimeter fence, described the umpire as “useless” for correctly calling a let, and lost the first set. Melzer, that wily old Viennese fox, was serving beautifully into the corners and hustling magnificently from the baseline. “Bravo, Jurgen!” Janowicz muttered, parroting the fervid cries of encouragement Melzer was getting from his corner.

But as long as Janowicz kept serving aces and hitting winners, he had a chance. The line judges were still irking him. After another call went against him, he bristled, went back to the baseline and sent down a 109 mph second serve ace to win the second set.

Melzer took the match into a decider after going a break down early in the fourth, but Janowicz’s head did not drop. He broke early in the final set and, serving for the match, produced a flawless love-game to wrap it up. As he dropped to his knees, a feral roar filled the cloudless Wimbledon skies.

He knew, as we did, that this could turn out to be quite a journey.