Author Topic: Jerzy Janowicz  (Read 3222 times)

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Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #100 on: August 08, 2013, 04:48:28 AM »
The Verdict: Jerzy Janowicz defeats Julien Benneteau 3-6, 6-3, 7-5 in the Rogers Cup First Round

By Juan José on August 6, 2013
 
 


 



Welcome to the another edition of The Verdict! This will be the way we write about matches from time to time. Here is the scale used to evaluate the match and certain aspects of each player:

The_Verdict_Rating_System

Overall Match Rating:

2_Changeovers

Match Verdict:

It was somewhere between “instrument of torture” and “slightly better than watching paint dry.” Way too many errors prevented the crowd from getting into the match, and nobody could blame them. Janowicz himself was simply going through the motions for about a set and a half. There were very few flashes of brilliance, and they were usually followed by an onslaught of miscues. An utterly forgettable affair.

Match Stats:

2013-08-06_1349

Player Ratings

2013-08-06_1411

The Verdict on Jerzy Janowicz

This was the 22 year-old’s first match on hard courts since losing to Thomaz Bellucci in the first round in Miami. It was also the first match since he retired in the second round of Hamburg against Verdasco, finally succumbing to the pain in his right arm that had been bothering him for months. Hence, quite a few questions lingered over the recent Wimbledon semifinalist: was he healthy? How would he do at an event he’d never played at before? Can he make it to that potentially exciting 3rd round match against Rafael Nadal?

Janowicz said after the match that his arm was OK. However, in a different interview with TennisTV, the Pole said that he hadn’t been able to practice his serve until he got to Canada. Which makes his struggles with double faults and good second serves a little more understandable.

I thought Janowicz’ forehand was far from its usual level, and I did not like how he seemingly abandoned his successful Wimbledon ploy of using his backhand in a safer way. Also, for much of the match Janowicz’ second serve return was simply atrocious. His movement seemed a step slow, and he even slipped into the net on the cement at one point, grass-court style.

Still, this was his first match on hard courts after a while, and again, he’s never played in Canada before. He’s trying to overcome an injury to his right arm as well, so the main takeaway for him is that he somehow found a way to get the win, even though he was a set down, then a break down in the third, and playing well below his capabilities throughout.

But it’s quite clear that unless Janowicz improves dramatically, his stay in Montreal won’t be very long.

The Verdict on Julien Benneteau

Ah, Benneteau. He started well, dominating Janowicz’ second serve and hitting his forehand with a lot of confidence and accuracy. Alas, it didn’t last long. In the third set Benneteau found a way to claw back from down a break, and found himself up 4-2. He then double faulted 3 times in his next service game, and got broken. He repeated the feat at 5-all, and once again, got broken.

In the end, it was the kind of performance from the erratic Frenchman that initially inspires you to ask “why hasn’t this guy won a title yet?,” only to realize after the match ends that it’s perfectly understandable why Julien Benneteau remains titleless on the ATP tour.
- See more at: http://www.changeovertennis.com/the-verdict-jerzy-janowicz-defeats-julien-benneteau-3-6-6-3-7-5-in-the-rogers-cup-first-round/#sthash.mxBZLGjW.dpuf

http://www.changeovertennis.com/the-verdict-jerzy-janowicz-defeats-julien-benneteau-3-6-6-3-7-5-in-the-rogers-cup-first-round/

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #101 on: August 10, 2013, 09:37:03 PM »
Final Thoughts

In the end, I was wrong: Jerzy Janowicz didn’t serve much better than in his previous two matches (you could argue that he served worse, given that he didn’t crack even 50% 1st serves and still rattled off 9 DFs in just two sets), but this was far from a very short and easy match for Rafael Nadal.

The Spaniard found himself having to break serve just to stay in the first set at 5-6 (after having set points on Janowicz’ serve at 5-4), only to then face a 2-5 hole in the ensuing tiebreaker. And even though Janowicz committed some calamitous errors to let those two leads slip, he still had Nadal down 0-3 to start the second set.

But the 22 year-old wavered, and you just can’t afford to do that against someone of Rafael Nadal’s stature, even if the all-time-great is just starting to shake off the rust of not playing competitively since the first Monday of Wimbledon.

The Spaniard, however, frequently finds ways to win this kind of match. His experience was a clear edge in his favor, and he also gifted those watching from the stands quite a few nuggets of his class. His backhand overhead at net on set point was a glorious piece of skill. He also identified Janowicz’ forehand as his main target (particularly with his serve), and even though Janowicz made him pay for it a few times, the tactical ploy ended up working.

Nadal has been here before: he knows the first few matches after a layoff are tricky, so it’s all about surviving and improving incrementally from match to match. Today his forehand gifted quite a few unforced errors, and his backhand didn’t look all that impressive. But more troubling was a bit from his on-court interview, when Pam Shriver asked him about what a good thing it was to see him out there without the tape on his knee. Pam was simply echoing the feeling of many tennis fans around the world – the absence of the tape had to be a good thing, no? Nadal’s answer kind of chilled that sentiment, as he said that the tape isn’t helping his knee at all, so there was no point in wearing it. Notice that he didn’t say he didn’t need the tape – it just wasn’t helping anymore.

As for Jerzy Janowicz, the best one can say about the Pole is that he doesn’t fail to show up for a big match. Once again, he acted like he belonged, even though his rookie status showed in that horrific smash at 30-all, 6-5 in the 1st (a correctly hit overhead would’ve given him a set point), and on that short, nervy DF at 5-all in the TB. He’s struggling with his serve, and with the timing on his forehand side. When you consider that those are two of the pillars on which Janowicz’s game is built upon, it’s quite remarkable that he even managed to make this match competitive.

2013 is still all about gaining experience for Jerzy, and he can’t say he hasn’t accumulated plenty of it. This match will remind him of the Rome quarterfinal against Roger Federer, where he also served for a set and couldn’t pull through. Apart from today’s tough lesson, Janowicz does leave Montreal knowing that even though he was far away from his best, he still won two matches and made Nadal work for his win.

Of course, if the serve comes back to its usual levels, and Janowicz gets his forehand timing right, he’ll have US Open Dark Horse written all over him.
- See more at: http://www.changeovertennis.com/liveanalysis-rafael-nadal-vs-jerzy-janowicz-in-the-canada-masters-third-round/#sthash.c54IKU7W.dpuf

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #102 on: August 20, 2013, 06:39:41 AM »

Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #103 on: August 20, 2013, 08:51:39 PM »
Jerzy is one player, for sure.
 
He really made Murray work at Wimbledon, and had Nadal in trouble recently too.
 
Both those matches he could have won.
 
Pretty remarkable for someone inexperienced as him.
 
 

Offline Lugburz

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #104 on: August 21, 2013, 08:59:56 AM »
He is a lot of fun to watch.

With the likes of him, he brought a tiny bit of bright future for the sport not to go one-dimensional. And hence more reasons for me to still have a lot of interest in ATP.
In the absence of light, darkness prevails!
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Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #105 on: August 21, 2013, 10:18:27 AM »
Nadal vs Janowicz Masters Montreal 2013 R3 · Resumen · Summary

Offline bupmonster

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #106 on: August 27, 2013, 10:38:39 PM »
I really like Jerzy's game style, especially the drop shots. He has so much talent and potential and if he actually uses his skills then we should be expecting big things from him in the coming years. He is also comparable to other youngsters like Milos Raonic or Grigor Dimitrov who have so much talent that they could be the next generation of grand slam winning tennis players. Too bad janowicz lost in the first round of the US OPEN 2013. I was expecting much more.
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #107 on: August 28, 2013, 05:43:28 AM »
Indeed, those drop shots are fun to watch.
Seems to me they come right out of the blue.
Nice touch for a big guy.

He's still got plenty of work to do in several areas before he can be a serious slam threat.
Let's hope he has the drive to do the work.
CONK da ball!!!

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #108 on: September 05, 2013, 02:22:45 AM »


In the land of the giants

It's good to be a big man in tennis these days -- well, most of the time


Updated: August 27, 2013, 10:32 PM ET
By  Howard Bryant | ESPN.com
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John Isner Cruises Into Second Round

John Isner defeated Filippo Volandri 6-0, 6-2, 6-3 in the first round of the US Open.Tags: John Isner,  U.S. Open,  US Open, Tennis


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Federer Eases Through Opener




 
NEW YORK -- I've never been a particular fan of "big man tennis," the phenomenon of basketball-sized players crushing massive serves and forehands, often at the expense of quickness and variety and completeness, sweeping the tennis world. Fighting the tide, however, would be like lamenting the existence of the 3-point shot. There's no going back. The game is being transformed into the land of the giants, and Tuesday's trip around the grounds proved the future nears only too well.

Louis Armstrong Stadium: Milos Raonic defeats Thomas Fabbiano 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3

Prospecting is the fun part of sports, especially among the fans who fancy anticipating the future stars, gathering their street cred by bragging that they were the first to discover the rising star, the tennis equivalent of saying, "I listened to Lady Gaga before she was really popular." Raonic, the 6-foot-5-inch hulk from Canada, along with Jerzy Janowicz and Kei Nishikori, is one of the fashionable picks to remake the top 10 in the coming months. Raonic's arrival on court Tuesday against world No. 176 Fabbiano was accompanied by considerable buzz.



  • EnlargeMilos Raonic

Timothy Clary/Getty ImagesMilos Raonic has been touted as one of the next big things in tennis. But the question is: When will he make his breakthrough?
Raonic eventually won the match in straights but won the crowd on the first serve of the match, when he bombed a 141 mph ace, followed by serves of 134 mph and an ace out wide at 115. Big man tennis had begun. Instead of following the ball across the net -- left, right, left, right, point, applause -- watching big man tennis is to alternate looking at the court and the radar gun. Raonic elicited gasps whenever he swung the racket, like when he ripped a 124 mph second serve to go up 2-1 in the first set or a 145 mph serve while serving for the first set at 5-3 that, thus far, is the fastest serve of the tournament. The spectacle was even more pronounced during changeovers, when the goliath Raonic would pass the 5-foot-8, 154-pound Fabbiano, and the crowd would gaze at Raonic as though he'd invaded Lilliput.

Of course, if Raonic is to become a top player as predicted, the real takeaway from the afternoon isn't that he out-aced Fabbiano 28-0, but how, once again, returning, the great Achilles' heel of the big man game, made this first-round match far closer than it needed to be.

Throughout the afternoon, the big boys would be on display. In addition to Raonic's 28 aces, 6-foot-10 John Isner would rack up 16 aces in destroying Filippo Volandri. Six-foot-6 Sam Querrey crushed 24 aces in beating Guido Pella. Here's their dirty little secret: The big men can't return. The ATP tracks return games won, and of the 73 players ranked, four of the lowest eight names are Janowicz (No. 66 at 18 percent), Querrey (No. 67 at 17 percent), Raonic (No. 70 at 15 percent) and lastly at 73, Isner at 12 percent.

Not surprisingly, four of the five highest-ranked players in this category -- David Ferrer (1), Rafael Nadal (2), Novak Djokovic (3) and Andy Murray (5) -- are the top four players in the world. Still, the radar gun lit up, the crowd exclaimed and Raonic's glass ceiling remained.

Court 11: Maximo Gonzalez defeats Jerzy Janowicz 6-4, 6-4, 6-2

What a sight watching Jerzy Janowicz, the darling of Wimbledon, crumble from frustration. He blasted a tennis ball out of the stadium not once, but twice in receiving a code violation, then lay on a towel on the court, three thick strips of physio tape on his lower right back.

The big man Janowicz, who went to the semifinals and lost to eventual Wimbledon champ Andy Murray, is gone, underscoring the difficulties of being an heir apparent and duplicating any previous successes.

And so it was 6-foot-8 Janowicz was taken out in straight sets by 5-foot-9 Argentine Gonzalez, 30, and ranked 247 in the world. Janowicz was stricken by bad luck, he says, and it was fatal. Three days before the match, Janowicz hurt his back. He doesn't know how. At this point, he doesn't care. He received an injection. He tried therapy and acupuncture and all it got him was a grueling battle with a gnawing, relentless clay-courter who has never been ranked higher than 58th. Gonzalez was hell-bent on making the final Grand Slam of the year a nightmare.

Janowicz's meltdown elicited thoughts of Roger Federer, not because the Swiss ever falls apart like that but because it only underscores what an amazing set of circumstances it takes to do what the Swiss has done. No ornery mood, bad conditions, tougher opponent or unfortunate injury has kept Federer from reaching the second round of a Slam in the past decade. Janowicz, the 140 mph man, was hitting serves at 78 mph. He dropped 11 double faults. He even served one ball underhand.

"I couldn't serve. I couldn't turn. I couldn't rotate," he said. "I asked the trainer for more painkillers but because of my injection they wouldn't give me more. … It's disappointing."

Still, Janowicz had opportunities. He received a medical timeout down a set and 4-1, returned and won the next three games. For short bursts, he ripped menacing forehands and powered through with big serves.

Serving 4-4, Janowicz was broken in the game, mentally and physically. The 14-seed, the dream of backing up Wimbledon with a deep run in New York, all of it, went up in flames.

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #109 on: September 05, 2013, 03:18:07 AM »



Tennis - Hopman Cup announces addition of Radwanska, Janowicz, Stosur and Tomic

Tennis - Poland and Australia confirm their line-ups
Tennis Stories  20 Aug 2013 - 20:07 / by Prakash / reads 792.
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Tennis - The Hopman Cup has announced the player-line ups for two more teams for their next edition.

Poland will be represented by world no. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska and top 15 ATP player Jerzy Janowicz while the home nation Australia will be represented by former US Open champion Sam Stosur and 21 year old Bernard Tomic.

Radwanska commented, "I’m really excited to play the Hopman Cup for the first time. I’ve never played mixed doubles with [Jerzy] before. Actually my last mixed doubles match was I think five years ago so that will be fun for sure.”

Stosur commented, "I just wanted to get back to Perth. I thought this year I’d try something different again. [The Hopman Cup] will be nice to be able to play. You know that you’re going to get three matches and maybe that’s going to be good for me going into the Aussie Open. Hopefully that’s going to be the secret formula to me doing well."

Tomic commented, “I had some success there earlier this year so hopefully I can do well again in 2014. The event always attracts strong teams so you know you’re going to get some tough matches against high quality players. The local crowds love their tennis and it’s always exciting to play in front of them."

Offline Clay Death

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #110 on: September 06, 2013, 11:59:40 PM »
is jerzy ready for davis cup action just after the u.s. open?

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #111 on: September 07, 2013, 09:22:42 AM »
is jerzy ready for davis cup action just after the u.s. open?

I think he is not going to attend Davis Cup.

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #112 on: October 17, 2013, 04:23:17 AM »
Jerzy backs from his back injure. He gets degenerative disc disease.

Offline Swish

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #113 on: October 17, 2013, 04:31:13 AM »
Jerzy backs from his back injure. He gets degenerative disc disease.

Hi William!!!  Jerzy won his first match easily but did have some help.
 
So good to see him back playing again.
 
He plays either Gulbis or sissling next.  :cool:

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #114 on: November 09, 2013, 12:33:56 AM »
ThoughtLog: Rafael Nadal defeats Jerzy Janowicz 7-5, 6-4 in Paris

By Juan José on November 1, 2013
 
 


 



The premise for ThoughtLogs is simple: these are matches that I was very interested in, but due to scheduling issues, I couldn’t watch live. Hence, I’ll keep a log of my observations as I watch the match later in the day.

For these posts, I’ll be using a bit of “tennis shorthand” today. Here’s your glossary:

BH: Backhand
BP: Break Point
CC: Cross-court
DF: Double-fault
DTL: Down the line (means the same as “up the line”)
FH: Forehand
GP: Game Point
I-I: Inside-In
I-O: Inside-Out
SP: Set Point
S&V: Serve and Volley
SW: Service Winner
UFE: Unforced Error

Off we go!

1. Man, is the arena packed or what?

2013-10-31_2218

Very nice to see so much interest in this match. Janowicz got a nice hand from the crowd. Nadal? A significantly louder one.

2. Time it took for Janowicz to unveil a drop shot? Probably around a minute: it happens in the second point of the match. It actually works. But that is followed by a terrible forehand that flies straight into the middle of the net.

In 2013, Janowicz’ forehand has gone from being his best shot to a slight liability. Strangely enough, his backhand has gone from major liability to a slight strength. The serve oscillates from major weapon to instrument of self-inflicted injury, depending on the day/set/game. The return of serve? That’s always an adventure.

3. At 0-1, 15-30, a missed half-opportunity for Janowicz: he plays a very good point, lines up a forehand down-the-line… and misses it by about a foot. It was the right play, but the execution wasn’t close to being appropriate. Nadal ends up holding to 30.

4. Jerzy Draper, or Don Janowicz?

2013-10-31_2235

5. The commentator for this match (for some reason, TennisTV uploaded the solo feed instead of the World feed) says at 2-all that we’ve seen two very easy service games by Janowicz and two struggles by Nadal. He would be right.

However, to my complete lack of surprise, Janowicz finds himself tied at 30-all in the very next service game after two silly errors (including another bad FH UFE into the net). He even challenges this first serve:

2013-10-31_2249

It was quite a Federer-esque challenge. However, Janowicz survives after a simply stunning inside-out backhand after a very good Nadal return. It forces the error from the World No. 1, and then a bomb of a serve seals the hold.

I wrote above that I wasn’t surprised to see Janowicz all of a sudden struggle in a service game. Aside from the fact that everyone will have a difficult game every once in a while, Janowicz is unparalleled at going from absolute dominance to inexplicable sloppiness in the blink of an eye. And in 2013, a sad staple of the Pole’s season has been having bad service games at the worst possible times – when serving out a set, staying in a set, etc.

6. Right after Nadal holds for 3-all, we see this graph:

2013-10-31_2255

Nadal is one of the best at giving opponents different looks when returning serve. Interesting to see that he’s way up near the baseline for first serves.

However, Janowicz delivers an absolute serving masterclass. He holds to love after blasting 4 straight aces. But what I find interesting is what serves were used:

0-0 – Violent slider out wide

15-0 – Flat out wide

30-0 – Violent slider out wide

40-0 – Flat out wide

True, he only used two different serves (he has quite a few more in the arsenal). But these two are borderline unreturnable when Jerzy executes them properly. This is one of the reasons why I think Janowicz might be the next dominant big server, the heir to Federer’s “minute hold” crown.

That 3-all service game lasted all of 49 seconds.

7. A correct bit of umpiring takes place at 0-0, 3-4. Nadal’s serve is called in (yet shown to be out by Hawk-Eye), but Janowicz waited until his floater of a return landed out to challenge. Good call by Damien Dumusois, who didn’t allow the challenge to go up. It was actually more of a brainfart by Janowicz, because he wasn’t really in a position that would indicate being ready to receive Nadal’s next shot – the Pole just stood there, waiting for his return to finally bounce.

8. Right before Janowicz blasts his 7th ace at 30-0, 4-all, we see this graph:

2013-10-31_2306

Significant, eh?

A point ago, Jerzy served a 234 km/h bomb. The crowd goes nuts when the speed is shown. Moments later, as Janowicz holds to love, he walks to his chair and flexes his bicep. He smiles, and then raises his fist from the chair as the 234 km/h flashes in the jumbotron. He’s happy.

Yet he won’t win another game in this set.

9. At 30-15, 5-4, Janowicz blasts a cross-court FH winner, and we see this graph:

2013-10-31_2311

Yet that was the lone highlight for Janowicz in a game full of Nadal excellence.

10. I know Janowicz gets broken here, but it sure doesn’t look like it based on the first two points. He starts this 5-all game by hitting a gorgeous dropper and putting away the resulting reply by Nadal. He then blasts a service winner. However, that’s followed by classic Nadal tennis. A great return gives him a shot at a mid-court forehand. The Spaniard amps up the spin, and sends it into Janowicz’ backhand. He repeats the maneuver after Janowicz’s reply, but then sends a FH down the line that Janowicz simply can’t handle (the Pole tried to counter-punch with an impossible running FH down-the-line. It didn’t come close to going in).

That’s fundamentally sound tennis: the perfect marriage between appropriate tactics and impeccable execution.

At 30-15, Janowicz badly misses yet another simple mid-court FH. A horrible mistake. 30-all. He then fires up a service winner up the T, and has a game point. But then, another mid-court FH goes into the net for Janowicz. At Deuce, Jerzy actually puts away a short FH DTL. That’s his second game point, which is wasted by some lazy post-serve footwork. Janowicz had hit a very good kicker, and Nadal had sent a very good deep return. But since it was a kicker and Nadal’s return wasn’t really a flat zinger, Janowicz had ample time to set up to hit a proper shot. He didn’t, and his hurried backhand sails long. Disaster looms when Janowicz has yet again a short FH to deal with, and decides to hit a CC dropper. Horrible shot selection, and it’s matched by horrible execution. That was an extremely low percentage shot, simply because Janowicz was here when he hit it:

2013-10-31_2320

See how Nadal is already leaning that way, since Janowicz didn’t have any time to disguise his shot? Never a good sign.

From the spot of the court where Janowicz is standing, there are two better options: 1) a safe cross-court FH that won’t end the point and 2) a tricky but doable FH down-the-line that probably won’t win the point if it’s hit with the necessary amount of spin, but will set up an easy put-away or another short ball.

Janowicz chose option 3: the brainfart, desperate dropper. In a related note, this triggers the first break point for either man so far in the match.

Somehow, Janowicz survives the break point solely because Rafael Nadal missed a shot he probably makes 99 times out of a 100. We had yet another desperate, obvious 2nd-ball dropper from Janowicz, Nadal tracked it down, sent a deep reply, and had a comfortable volley off of Janowicz’ below-average pass. And yet, Nadal missed the putaway volley wide. Unbelievable mistake.

Janowicz threatens to hold after a good serve affords him an easy smash, but then fails to convert his third game point when he sends a third ball dropper into the net. It wasn’t a bad idea, actually: Jerzy had hit a good inside-out FH that Nadal floated back, and Janowicz held the BH disguise until the very last second for the cross-court dropper. Also, look where Nadal is at the moment of impact:

2013-10-31_2333

See? Nadal is at least 3 feet behind the baseline, and moving to his right. Janowicz chose the right play here, and just botched the execution. I have no problem with trying droppers in this context: what I do hate is 2nd ball (the shot after the serve) desperate droppers that the opponent can read a mile away.

The next point, though, is utter madness from Janowicz. Nadal sends a great return off of that violent slider out wide. Janowicz half-volleys it deep, and Nadal sends a neutral FH into Janowicz’ BH…who somehow decides to use another dropper. Nadal was squarely on the baseline, moving forward. Guess what happened? Yep, the Spaniard chased it down and turned it into a winner. It wasn’t even all that hard.

Faced with a second break point, Janowicz sends a very good 2nd serve kicker out wide… but Nadal returns it extremely well. Janowicz isn’t ready, and sends a soft reply up the middle. Nadal smells blood, lines up for a big cross-court FH, and watches Janowicz’ desperate reply sail long. He’s broken.

This is why the Rafael will most likely finish the year ranked No.1, whereas Janowicz will finish the year ranked outside the top 20.

11. A key point at 30-all: Nadal hits a cross-court FH that the line judge and Janowicz claim was out. Nadal himself doesn’t seem to optimistic as he challenges. And yet, Hawk-Eye rewards his decision:

2013-10-31_2352

That’s the difference between a set point and a break point. Nadal shortly after converts the former.

The stats for this set scream “tiebreaker:”

 2013-10-31_2354

And yet…

Second Set

12. Janowicz plays an unforgivably terrible opening service game in the second set. His backhand misfires on 3 occasions (2 unforced, one quasi unforced), and Nadal’s great return made the difference in the remaining point, which set up 0-40. A related thought: Nadal is all over Janowicz’ slider out wide from the deuce court. Which serves as a reminder that in the ATP, it’s not so much about power as it is about unpredictability when it comes to the serve. It’s about creating confusion on the returner’s mind. If you become predictable with your service patterns…you’re in trouble.

What I don’t understand is why Janowicz isn’t using his other serves on that side. I’ve seen him hit plenty of aces up the T, and he can even go body with it.

At any rate, Nadal breaks at love.

13. This is an interesting graph:

2013-11-01_0009

Notice that clump of red balls over on the left corner of the AD court service box.

Surprisingly, Nadal plays a very sloppy service game, and he’s given away his break lead in this second set.

14. Someone seems to be balding at a quick pace:

2013-11-01_0012

That someone is somehow on the verge of winning 3 straight games: he has a break point at 2-1, 30-40. It is wasted when he lunges for a huge 2nd serve backhand return and misses wide. Janowicz was all over that serve, but Nadal did get a nice angle on it.

Moments later, Janowicz has a great chance to set up another break point, but sends a simple BH putaway long. A costly miss. Nadal then pummels Jerzy’s two-hander, and escapes a tricky service game.

15. In the next service game (2-all), a rather awkward moment takes place at 40-30. Janowicz comes to net after his serve, but his volley floats long. Nadal is on it, and though the ball is seemingly going long, he still sends a passing shot straight at Janowicz, who has stopped moving and is simply standing there.

The key here is that the call from the line judge was strangely late: it actually came right when Nadal hit his shot. Hence, the World No. 1 did the correct thing by not stopping play and hitting that passing shot. Of course, Janowicz could’ve avoided being tagged at net had he followed Nadal’s lead and played until the call came.

Of course, the Paris crowd boos Nadal.

However, upon further review, Janowicz showed incredible reflexes and actually got a racquet on Nadal’s shot. So there, no harm done.

Moments later, Janowicz saves 2 BPs, one of them thanks to a rare botched 2nd serve return by Nadal. However, Janowicz botches a short FH for the 21098408th time in the match, and then double-faults on the ensuing BP.

Strangely enough (given Jerzy’s recent struggles with DFs), that was his first of the match. It wasn’t even close: probably missed the T by about a foot.

Before that, we got this very nice graph:

2013-11-01_0041

Can you imagine how nice it would be to have this data for all the players in the top 10 in both the ATP and the WTA?

16. Nadal plays yet another sloppy service game, and finds himself down 30-40. He saves the BP with a fantastic, smart shot: Janowicz’ cross-court BH return had pulled him wide and into the forecourt, but Nadal amps up the RPMs on his FH, and safely hits it down-the-line for a winner. Not an easy shot, yet it was impeccably executed. Some sloppy points later, the man from Manacor holds.

17. There’s a shot that no one else in tennis hits other than Rafael Nadal: the no-look counter-dropper. It’s more a soccer/basketball play than a tennis play, actually. He unveils it in the second point of the 4-2 Janowicz service game. It’s a jewel of a shot.

18. An update on the Janowicz 1st serve placement graph:

2013-11-01_0055

Interesting how the wide serve from the AD court keeps being money. The slider out wide from the deuce court? Not so much.

19. Quite often, Janowicz’ post-shot footwork is an absolute mess. Here he is after hitting a half-volley FH after a good Nadal return of a wide serve from the Deuce court:

2013-11-01_0057

See how unprepared Janowicz is for Nadal’s shot? Notice the lack of knee-bend? And see how Nadal is sprinting towards that ball?  This resulted in a very predictable FH DTL winner by Nadal.

Janowicz wasn’t anywhere near it.

20. Last year’s Paris runner-up keeps fighting, and he has a BP to stay alive in the match at 4-5. However, he can’t get any depth on his return, and Nadal pounces on the short ball. Janowicz gets another BP after Nadal inexplicably double-faults. It has to be said that the 13-time Slam champ has been rather wobbly at times in this second set. Not so in the first.

The break point is fascinating, Nadal does incredible defensive things with his feet, and then Janowicz botches a mid-court FH for the 10840850850858th time. Straight into the net.

Two match points go begging for Nadal. The second after yet another double-fault.  He even faces a third BP, but erases it with a simply phenomenal inside-out FH after a very good return up the middle. This is where Nadal placed that FH:

2013-11-01_0108

 Not pleased with that, Nadal sets up another match point after placing a tricky volley here:

2013-11-01_0109

Big time players hit big time shots when they need them. It really boils down to that.

Moments later, Nadal has won the match.

This is how Jerzy Janowicz’ season ends: with the best seat in the house to watch an all-time great do special things. May the young Pole use it as motivation for 2014, because there’s enormous potential within him to do special things on a tennis court.

But as of his last match of 2013, it’s still unfulfilled potential.
- See more at: http://www.changeovertennis.com/thoughtlog-rafael-nadal-defeats-jerzy-janowicz-7-5-6-4-paris/#sthash.yaNfCOIR.dpuf

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #115 on: November 10, 2013, 09:37:32 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKfOqaFD5WU

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #116 on: December 20, 2013, 07:37:30 PM »
Poland's Jerzy Janowicz withdraws from Hopman Cup
Jerzy Janowicz was to team with women's No.5 Agnieszka Radwanska at the annual international mixed team tournament in Perth, Australia, which serves as a warm-up for January's Australian Open.

Associated Press  |  Last updated on Wednesday, 18 December 2013 14:39 Print font size
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Perth:  Wimbledon semifinalist Jerzy Janowicz has pulled out of the Poland team for this month's Hopman Cup with a foot injury. (Click here for more on tennis news)

Janowicz was to team with women's No.5 Agnieszka Radwanska at the annual international mixed team tournament in Perth, Australia, which serves as a warm-up for January's Australian Open. He will be replaced in the draw by Davis Cup teammate Grzegorz Panfil. (Also read: Bopanna confident of good start to season)

Janowicz said he injured his foot a couple of weeks ago and was hoping to be fit in time to play. "Poland will be making its debut at the event and I wish Agnieszka the best of luck."

John Isner, Sloane Stephens, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Petra Kvitova, Sam Stosur and Bernard Tomic are among the field for this year's tournament from December 28 to January 4.

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Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #117 on: January 15, 2014, 10:04:58 AM »
Result: Jerzy Janowicz into third round after comeback in Australian Open

Polish tennis player Jerzy Janowicz returns a ball to Spanish tennis player David Ferrer during the Open 500 Valencia quarter-finals match at the Agora space in Valencia, on October 25, 2013
© Getty Images








By Matt Cotton, Reporter
Filed: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 06:42 UK
Last Updated: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 11:31 UK

Jerzy Janowicz booked his place in the third round of the Australian Open on Wednesday, but only after recovering from a first-set loss.

The Wimbledon semi-finalist came back from a set down to see off Spanish opponent Pablo Andujar 6-4 6-7 6-7 3-6 in the second stage on Show Court Three at Melbourne Park.

The world number 20, who is ranked 28 places higher than the Spaniard, threw away three break points in a losing opening set, before squeezing past Andujar via tie breaks in the following two.

However, Janowicz made sure of avoiding any upset by picking up a comfortable victory in the final set.

http://www.sportsmole.co.uk/tennis/australian-open/result/result-janowicz-into-third-round-after-comeback_130507.html

Offline williamchung7

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Re: Jerzy Janowicz
« Reply #118 on: March 03, 2014, 07:35:40 AM »
Jerzy will play both single and double at Indian Wells. He said to Polland media that he needs more practice to improve his game.