Author Topic: Question about rackets  (Read 2597 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

newbie

  • Guest
Question about rackets
« on: December 31, 2004, 04:16:20 PM »
Hello, I've just recently gotten interested in tennis.  I was wondering what kind of cheap racket should I but to start out with, or does it matter?

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2004, 05:15:52 PM »
Have you started taking any kind of lessons or are you just hitting with friends?

I am not sure that a special racquet will do you any good yet, a cheapie will be a good buy for the first 4-8 months if you are just goofing around once a week.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Anonymous

  • Guest
Question about rackets
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2005, 02:29:42 PM »
I might take lessons i'm not sure yet.  I just don't know if there is anything in particular I should take into coinsideration while looking for a racket.

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2005, 04:58:37 PM »
Right now there is probably not much.  If you want to get something fairly good you could get a "tweener" racquet.  You could get one used (they sell for cheap and are in great condition) for probably $50-$60...
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Offline hummer23mm

  • Tennis Addict
  • ****
  • Posts: 170
    • http://www.atptennis.com
Question about rackets
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2005, 06:55:59 PM »
go with a frame tahts not too heavy and has alarge enough headsize, look for one over 1oo square inches.  wislon has lots of afordable frames you can pick up at walmart or soemthing.  try to avoid the little pink ones . . .  also, make sure to get a full size one,  it should be 27 inches, not a junior racquet.
Mike

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2005, 07:18:00 PM »
Good call, indeed a 110+ square inch racquet will probably be better to start with.  And the pink, avoid at all costs.  I figured you would know the difference between the kids and the adult racquets, but like he said, make sure you grab the longer ones.  :)
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Offline MC ill Logic

  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 1378
Question about rackets
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2005, 07:46:43 PM »
A lot of high end rackets just don't end up selling that well and end up getting sold at deep discounts.  

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/liquidation.html

Don't think twice about buying a Demo racket either.  

Get something light (so not a player's racket), mid plus or oversized, and don't get the extended rackets (extended frames are longer than standard frames, I think by half an inch).

This racket might be good:  http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCPRINCE-TTB.html

Even if you just go to a local sporting goods store, it's hard to go wrong for 60 bucks.  Just don't buy a "difficult" player's frame that most of the pros use.  Buy a big, light, forgiving one.

Anonymous

  • Guest
Question about rackets
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2005, 10:03:09 PM »
links aint working, ill logic.

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2005, 10:13:46 PM »
McIll's links are ok, Tenniswarehouse.com seems to be down, check in the morning, I doubt they will ever be down long, they are to big...
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

newbie

  • Guest
Question about rackets
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2005, 12:08:14 AM »
cool, Thanx for all the advice!

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2005, 08:31:41 AM »
Thye are working now...
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com

Offline val

  • Tennis Enthusiast
  • ***
  • Posts: 79
Question about rackets
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2005, 02:09:01 PM »
Quote from: "Tennis4you"
Right now there is probably not much.  If you want to get something fairly good you could get a "tweener" racquet.  You could get one used (they sell for cheap and are in great condition) for probably $50-$60...


What is a "tweener" racquet?  I've read the tenniswarehouse reviews and they'll label racquets (well, the ones I'd consider) as tweeners and game improvement racquets.  What's the difference?

Val

Offline Tennis4you

  • Administrator
  • Tennis God
  • ******
  • Posts: 24878
  • Gender: Male
    • Tennis4you
Question about rackets
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2005, 02:25:27 PM »
Val,

I hope this helps!

Game Improvement Racquets
Quote
This is the term used by racquet manufacturers for power-oriented racquets. In most cases, these racquet models feature oversize to super-oversize heads (107-135 square inches), are lightweight (8-9.5 ounces), longer (27-29 inches) stiffer and are balanced head-heavy (or evenly balanced) to retain enough weight in the hitting zone. Designed for players with shorter, slower swings and who want more power from the racquet.


Tweener Racquets
Quote
There are several models that offer a blend of features from game improvement and player’s racquets. They are often light-er (9.5-11 ounces), balanced anywhere from slightly head-light to slightly head-heavy, have midplus (95-102 square inches) heads and are usually extended length (27.5-28 inches). These racquet models offer low-medium to medium-high power and are most appealing to intermediate-advanced players, seeking enhanced maneuverability.



Control or Players Racquets
Quote
Denotes racquets that would be used by professional and high-level club and college team players. These models are typically heavier in weight (11.5-13+ ounces), have smaller heads (85-98), thinner, more flexible beams and are balanced head light to retain maneuverability. The result is a low-power racquet, designed for players who provide their own power and prefer a racquet that offers more control. Can be standard or extended length.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
http://www.tennis4you.com