Author Topic: Tennis Tips  (Read 5552 times)

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Offline wilsonboy

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Tennis Tips
« on: April 14, 2006, 07:52:29 PM »
I thought it would be a good idea to put this in this thread. Tennis.com has weekly tips along with other sides so I thought I'd borrow them and put them on here. It'd be better if the common problems are presented to people instead of them just guessing what's wrong with their game and hoping for an anwer. Anyways, here's the first tip I found to improve ur ground strokes:

 
Quote
The 12 Step Program for Tennis

April 10, 2006–Whenever our strokes fail most of us assume our swing is to blame. But my observation is that the majority of errors in tennis occur when players stop moving their feet as much as they normally do, forcing them to use their hands in unpracticed ways to compensate for their poor positioning. And all too often the predictable result is a ball that goes into the net or outside the lines.

Tennis is a game of movement and good preparation. The best players know this and pay special attention to their footwork. Need evidence? Consider this. The pros average about 10-12 steps between each ball they hit in a rally (around 8-10 if they get into a crosscourt exchange where the ball is hit too deep for the opponent to change the direction without a high risk factor); strong high school players and fair college players about 8-10; 4.0-4.5 players about 6-8; 3.0-3.5 players about 4-6; and 2.5-3.0 players only take an average of 2-4 steps between shots in a point.

Want to raise your level of play? Clearly, one way to do it is to add more steps to your preparation. In fact, if you aim for an average of 12 steps between shots your level of play will sky rocket. Guaranteed. Oh, by the way, if you think this doesn't apply to you because you play doubles, think again. The Bryan brothers often take 20 steps between
shots when they play.—Ken Dehart, USPTA and PTR Master Pro
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Offline imkonadian88

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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2006, 10:50:17 PM »
that's a really good advice. easier said than done, but awesome to know that there are some tangible truths to that. ;)
move it.


Offline Tennis4you

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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2006, 04:50:44 PM »
holy hell!  What are those links?  They slow my pc down and show up as gibberish.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2006, 04:55:45 PM »
really? it doesn't do that for me...
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Offline SerenaSlam06

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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2006, 04:58:22 PM »
Ah, I really should re-install Windows Media Player on my comp.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, to make it possible.

Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2006, 05:03:22 PM »
okay, just try this link and the videos should all work on there:

http://www.fairview-tennis-club.com/tennistips/tips.htm
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2006, 07:44:06 PM »
Tip of the week:

Quote
Tip of the Week – Don’t Be a Pushover

By Jon Levey, Senior Editor, Tennis Magazine

April 24, 2006 – Whether you’re sticking up for yourself on the playground or looking for respect on the tennis court, nobody likes to get pushed around. And few shots can intimidate players quite like a booming first serve. Run into an opponent that blitzes you with aces and lots of service winners leading to easy holds can make you feel like a bit of a chump. This also lets your opponent relax and be aggressive returning your serve because you can’t put any pressure on him when it’s your turn. Yet if you can put a good amount of returns in play, not only will you challenge the big server, but by nullifying his primary weapon, you’ll shake his confidence. Here are a couple of ways to send a big serve back where it came from.

Stand well behind the baseline on the return: Generally, most players like to stand just behind or even on the baseline when waiting to receive serve. But if you find yourself constantly on your heels and making contact late on the return, then give yourself more time. Take another few steps back behind the baseline to start. Unless your opponent is hurting you with sharp angled serves out wide, then there’s really no harm in giving yourself more room.

Move forward into contact:When a fast serve is barreling down on you, there’s a tendency to stand flatfooted and just try to block the ball back. This basically lets the serve push you around. When a football player is about to get tackled he doesn’t stand up straight and allow his opponent to crush him–he leans into the tackle to lessen the blow. Getting some forward momentum into the shot will give you a better of chance of making the return, as well as sending it back with pace and depth.  

Shorten your stroke: Since your opponent is giving you a lot pace, you don’t need to take a big swing. Use an abbreviated backswing and try to make good contact with a square racquet face out in front of your body. That along with your body weight moving into the shot will give your return plenty of pop.
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2006, 09:07:18 PM »
Tip of the century:

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Offline NJtennis11

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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2006, 10:00:13 PM »
Truthfully, I think standing well behind the baseline is not a good tip.  Especially if the person has a good kick serve, then you need to take it early before it gets to high on you.  I don't know, the idea of standing far back but not blocking the returns together seems odd.

Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2006, 02:48:14 PM »
I agree, I just posted it in hopes that it might help SOME players. Personally, i stand well within the baseline on my returns(on the baseline for heavy serves).
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2007, 06:12:25 AM »
(Wow, I haven't done this in a while)

Okay, so here's a personal tip I have:

Tired of your strings breaking every 5 seconds? Well, I have a couple personal tips that will extend the life of your strings. First off, you know those candles you have in your atic somewhere that you'll probably never use in this day and age? Well, why don't you try taking those suckers and rub them over the strings? The wax somehow coats the strings and thus, gives it a longer life. It's best to do it immediately after getting a string-job.

The next one is one that I use the most. Generally, it's the virtical strings that pop due to friction against the horizontal strings. So, if you look at your racquet strings now--around the sweet-spot area--you can see it cutting through. What you must do is shift all the horizontal strings up (or down) by about 2 millimeters (a little bit) so that it is cutting through a new spot. This technique actually doubled my string life.

Hope that helps.
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Offline pawan89

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« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2007, 09:46:16 AM »
question. wouldnt waxing the strings make them lose thier.. ability to spin and take cuts at the ball?

I guess I'll give it a shot. Does Peroleum Jelly count as well or does it have to be candle wax.. I suppose candle wax cuz it has to stay on. i'll give it a shot near the sweet spot and see how it goes. thank you.


Offline Tennis4you

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« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2007, 09:52:11 AM »
Quote from: "pawan89"
question. wouldnt waxing the strings make them lose thier.. ability to spin and take cuts at the ball?

I guess I'll give it a shot. Does Peroleum Jelly count as well or does it have to be candle wax.. I suppose candle wax cuz it has to stay on. i'll give it a shot near the sweet spot and see how it goes. thank you.


It would indeed cut back on the amount of spin you could get on the ball.  String Savers are probably best for string saving.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2007, 06:11:24 PM »
Quote from: "pawan89"
question. wouldnt waxing the strings make them lose thier.. ability to spin and take cuts at the ball?

I guess I'll give it a shot. Does Peroleum Jelly count as well or does it have to be candle wax.. I suppose candle wax cuz it has to stay on. i'll give it a shot near the sweet spot and see how it goes. thank you.


oh, well I don't know about Petroleum Jelly... but the waxing doesn't really do anything at all to your shots. I mean, if you have like a huge chunk lodged in the strings, then yeah, it would hinder playability. But a light coat should help. And remember, it works best if the racquet was freshly strung.
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2007, 06:06:10 AM »
Quote
January 29, 2007 - Adjust for high balls  
 
By Tony Lance

One of the toughest shots for most recreational players to handle is the high-bouncing ball, especially if it has a lot of topspin on it. But there’s an easy way to improve your success rate in dealing with these pesky shots: Use a higher backswing.

Lots of players unwittingly lower their chances of returning high balls effectively by taking their racquet back the same way they do for waist-high or low-bouncing shots. By doing so they force themselves to have to swing sharply upward to meet the ball and this puts the racquet and the oncoming ball on very different paths, thus requiring nearly perfect timing to make good contact. Instead, you’d be much better off taking your racquet back higher than usual and adjusting your entire swing up. That way you’ll put your racquet more in line with the ball and improve your chances of making a solid hit.

Tony Lance is the instruction editor at TENNIS magazine.
 
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Offline wilsonboy

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« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2007, 10:03:05 AM »
Doubles Tip

Quote
February 12, 2007 - Don’t hog the alley  
 
By Tony Lance

One of the most commonly made mistakes in recreational doubles is for the partner of the server to stand close the singles sideline—some even go so far as to stand in the alley—to prevent the receiver from burning them down the line with the return of serve. While this position certainly reduces the likelihood of that happening, it’s an unwise play for several reasons.

Here’s why:

– It takes you out of the point:  The most likely place for the receiver to aim his returns in doubles is crosscourt or down the middle because they have more court to hit into and the net is lower. Therefore, standing close to the alley means you’re positioning yourself to best cover the least probable return. What’s more, since the receiver doesn’t have to worry about you picking off his returns, you make it easier for him to make what’s already a percentage play while at the same time making it that much more difficult for you to intercept your opponents’ odds-on shot.

– The server has to cover too much court: By standing near the alley you leave your serving partner to cover the equivalent of an entire singles court—by himself. Whether he stays back or comes in your position puts him in a tough spot from the beginning and prevents you from being much help at all.

So where should you stand? Whenever your partner is serving place yourself smack in the middle of the service boxopposite the receiver. This position places you in the best spot to take advantage of your proximity to the net and pick off your opponents’ returns.

Tony Lance is the instruction editor at TENNIS magazine.
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