Author Topic: Another newbie  (Read 5806 times)

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Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2007, 12:04:37 AM »


Welcome to the forum Swish.  :uh: :uh: :uh:



Thanks, I appreciate it!

Offline Dallas

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2007, 10:20:12 PM »


Welcome to the forum Swish.  :uh: :uh: :uh:



Thanks, I appreciate it!


Hey Swish.... you're new and already have over 100 post!  Keep it up!  I really have enjoyed your post.

Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2007, 10:26:00 PM »


Welcome to the forum Swish.  :uh: :uh: :uh:



Thanks, I appreciate it!


Hey Swish.... you're new and already have over 100 post!  Keep it up!  I really have enjoyed your post.

It's always good to hear, Thanks!! 


Offline kickserve

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2007, 04:37:29 AM »
7 posts per day: that's really solid. Probably one of the most prolific posters. :thumbs-up:
« Last Edit: October 06, 2007, 04:38:35 AM by kickserve »

Offline pawan89

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2007, 09:45:36 AM »
Uhh.. I usually don't welcome posters on this intro page cuz they don't stay and if they stay i'll have somehow welcomed them while talking. but I guess Welcome :) I read the your article, good article. Didn't entirely convince me but good article neverthless.


Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2007, 12:14:09 PM »
Uhh.. I usually don't welcome posters on this intro page cuz they don't stay and if they stay i'll have somehow welcomed them while talking. but I guess Welcome :) I read the your article, good article. Didn't entirely convince me but good article neverthless.

Thanks, I throw those articles out there that I think might be of interest, people can usually find something they like or see it in a different way. I can't post as much as I want, no tennis channel and I don't have the knowledge of some of these posters so I have to pick my spots where I do know. Anyways, this is a great forum.  :thumbs-up:

Online monstertruck

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2007, 09:24:51 AM »
Welcome to the forums Swish and thanks for sharing a very interesting article about strings!  I had to read through it several times in order to soak it all in.  The conclusion I've come to is that the gear is a means to an end.  It allows players to utilize the technique which generates the spin.  I think DMast hit the nail right on the head when he said he could generate more spin with a board using proper technique than a player using the best "spin gear" could with improper technique.
That being said, a player is better off taking a few lessons on developing the right strokes for generating spin than searching for a string or racquet that will do it for them.

One thing to remember when choosing a  racquet and strings, is to select the proper gear for the style of tennis you play.  i.e. if you have short, slow strokes you might want to try a racquet with a larger head (open string pattern) and low-moderate string tension.  This combination will help you generate power which short, slow strokes generally lack.  If you have a long, fast swing, a smaller head (tighter string pattern) and higher string tension will help you control or  "reign in" the power generated by your strokes. 

When selecting strings, most of my buddies are so concerned with durability (i.e. price per play) that they often overlook what I consider the most important factor for players who hit less than 6 hours per week-  tension loss!!!  Because they don't break strings very often and choose not to restring until they do, after several weeks the tension drops anywhere from 10-15% depending on what type of string they use.  What cracks me up is that they then wonder why balls start to fly that they're used to hitting in.  Invariably, as the weeks go by, they adjust their game to compensate for the lower tension.  That absolutley amazes me.  :rofl_2: Then when they get a fresh set of strings they proclaim how wonderful it feels.  I usually respond, and I quote "No shiite Sherlock!!!"

Sorry to ramble on, hope you found a tidbit or 2 of info buried in there.  Don't forget to get your journal up and running to keep us all posted on your tennis escapades!
CONK da ball!!!

Offline dmastous

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2007, 09:31:36 AM »
Welcome to the forums Swish and thanks for sharing a very interesting article about strings!  I had to read through it several times in order to soak it all in.  The conclusion I've come to is that the gear is a means to an end.  It allows players to utilize the technique which generates the spin.  I think DMast hit the nail right on the head when he said he could generate more spin with a board using proper technique than a player using the best "spin gear" could with improper technique.
That being said, a player is better off taking a few lessons on developing the right strokes for generating spin than searching for a string or racquet that will do it for them.

One thing to remember when choosing a  racquet and strings, is to select the proper gear for the style of tennis you play.  i.e. if you have short, slow strokes you might want to try a racquet with a larger head (open string pattern) and low-moderate string tension.  This combination will help you generate power which short, slow strokes generally lack.  If you have a long, fast swing, a smaller head (tighter string pattern) and higher string tension will help you control or  "reign in" the power generated by your strokes. 

When selecting strings, most of my buddies are so concerned with durability (i.e. price per play) that they often overlook what I consider the most important factor for players who hit less than 6 hours per week-  tension loss!!!  Because they don't break strings very often and choose not to restring until they do, after several weeks the tension drops anywhere from 10-15% depending on what type of string they use.  What cracks me up is that they then wonder why balls start to fly that they're used to hitting in.  Invariably, as the weeks go by, they adjust their game to compensate for the lower tension.  That absolutley amazes me.  :rofl_2: Then when they get a fresh set of strings they proclaim how wonderful it feels.  I usually respond, and I quote "No shiite Sherlock!!!"

Sorry to ramble on, hope you found a tidbit or 2 of info buried in there.  Don't forget to get your journal up and running to keep us all posted on your tennis escapades!

Nice to see the Monster back and participating.  :whistle:
Tension loss is the best reason for using gut. Especially if you are not a string breaker. Gut maintains tension essentially until it breaks. So you pay $30 for a synthetic string job and after a few months your shots are lifeless and you can't keep the ball in play. You get a new string job after maybe 3 months and the life returns, and after a few months you need to restring to get the life back. You've paid $90 and gotten a years worth of playing. Or you could go with gut and pay $50 or $60 and not have to worry about until it breaks.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)

Online monstertruck

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2007, 09:39:59 AM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:
CONK da ball!!!

Offline dmastous

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2007, 09:53:13 AM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:

Everything looses tension over time and use. But there is no synthetic string that comes close to gut when it comes to, well, anything. Playabilty, power, and significantly tension loss.
Think of it this way. What is gut? It's usually made from sheep or cow intestine fiber (the greener the grass the better the gut ;-()). Intestines are designed by nature, or God, or whomever, to expand and contract over and over over the life of whatever beast it is in. Food comes in, it expands, food gets digested it contracts to it's orignal form. That's what the fiber is designed for and no synthetic fiber comes close to it when it comes to expanding and contracting to its original form.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)

Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2007, 10:17:53 AM »
Welcome to the forums Swish and thanks for sharing a very interesting article about strings!  I had to read through it several times in order to soak it all in.  The conclusion I've come to is that the gear is a means to an end.  It allows players to utilize the technique which generates the spin.  I think DMast hit the nail right on the head when he said he could generate more spin with a board using proper technique than a player using the best "spin gear" could with improper technique.
That being said, a player is better off taking a few lessons on developing the right strokes for generating spin than searching for a string or racquet that will do it for them.

One thing to remember when choosing a  racquet and strings, is to select the proper gear for the style of tennis you play.  i.e. if you have short, slow strokes you might want to try a racquet with a larger head (open string pattern) and low-moderate string tension.  This combination will help you generate power which short, slow strokes generally lack.  If you have a long, fast swing, a smaller head (tighter string pattern) and higher string tension will help you control or  "reign in" the power generated by your strokes. 

When selecting strings, most of my buddies are so concerned with durability (i.e. price per play) that they often overlook what I consider the most important factor for players who hit less than 6 hours per week-  tension loss!!!  Because they don't break strings very often and choose not to restring until they do, after several weeks the tension drops anywhere from 10-15% depending on what type of string they use.  What cracks me up is that they then wonder why balls start to fly that they're used to hitting in.  Invariably, as the weeks go by, they adjust their game to compensate for the lower tension.  That absolutley amazes me.  :rofl_2: Then when they get a fresh set of strings they proclaim how wonderful it feels.  I usually respond, and I quote "No shiite Sherlock!!!"

Sorry to ramble on, hope you found a tidbit or 2 of info buried in there.  Don't forget to get your journal up and running to keep us all posted on your tennis escapades!

Nice to see the Monster back and participating.  :whistle:
Tension loss is the best reason for using gut. Especially if you are not a string breaker. Gut maintains tension essentially until it breaks. So you pay $30 for a synthetic string job and after a few months your shots are lifeless and you can't keep the ball in play. You get a new string job after maybe 3 months and the life returns, and after a few months you need to restring to get the life back. You've paid $90 and gotten a years worth of playing. Or you could go with gut and pay $50 or $60 and not have to worry about until it breaks.

monstertruck. dmastous. Thanks for the tips, about the gut I don't hear about it much in my readings, it's mostly about poly. So this information is good. right now i have poly, and I have to put alot of power into the strokes. The mains were strung at 62, crosses at 60, I'm using wilson sensation duo.
I'll be referencing your posts a few times, making sure I got it!
I have a few of my tennis escapades in the "what was the worst you have ever been hosed" topic.  :)


Online monstertruck

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2007, 12:46:24 PM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:

Everything looses tension over time and use. But there is no synthetic string that comes close to gut when it comes to, well, anything. Playabilty, power, and significantly tension loss.
Think of it this way. What is gut? It's usually made from sheep or cow intestine fiber (the greener the grass the better the gut ;-()). Intestines are designed by nature, or God, or whomever, to expand and contract over and over over the life of whatever beast it is in. Food comes in, it expands, food gets digested it contracts to it's orignal form. That's what the fiber is designed for and no synthetic fiber comes close to it when it comes to expanding and contracting to its original form.

Well, that sure makes sense!!!  Is there a particular gut you prefer and what is the average play time per string job?
CONK da ball!!!

Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2007, 02:57:14 PM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:

Everything looses tension over time and use. But there is no synthetic string that comes close to gut when it comes to, well, anything. Playabilty, power, and significantly tension loss.
Think of it this way. What is gut? It's usually made from sheep or cow intestine fiber (the greener the grass the better the gut ;-()). Intestines are designed by nature, or God, or whomever, to expand and contract over and over over the life of whatever beast it is in. Food comes in, it expands, food gets digested it contracts to it's orignal form. That's what the fiber is designed for and no synthetic fiber comes close to it when it comes to expanding and contracting to its original form.

Well, that sure makes sense!!!  Is there a particular gut you prefer and what is the average play time per string job?

I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.

Offline dmastous

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #33 on: October 07, 2007, 04:55:18 PM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:

Everything looses tension over time and use. But there is no synthetic string that comes close to gut when it comes to, well, anything. Playabilty, power, and significantly tension loss.
Think of it this way. What is gut? It's usually made from sheep or cow intestine fiber (the greener the grass the better the gut ;-()). Intestines are designed by nature, or God, or whomever, to expand and contract over and over over the life of whatever beast it is in. Food comes in, it expands, food gets digested it contracts to it's orignal form. That's what the fiber is designed for and no synthetic fiber comes close to it when it comes to expanding and contracting to its original form.

Well, that sure makes sense!!!  Is there a particular gut you prefer and what is the average play time per string job?

I prefer Bow Brand, but most prefer Babblelot.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)

Offline dmastous

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #34 on: October 07, 2007, 04:59:59 PM »


I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.

I would say he's mostly right, but I do think Alu rough will result in more spin that what you have.
As for not recognizing any change, I would say that may because your game is evolving. At some point you will reach a plateau and gain a certain expectation from your string. You will find a new set of strings sparks you a bit and it feels good for awhile, and that feeling will fade. Also, string loses a lot of tension just between the time it's installed and the time you get out to play. If you pick up your racquet from the stringer today, and play tomorrow most of the tension it will initially lose will have been lost already. But it will continue to lose tension over it's lifetime.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)

Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2007, 05:19:10 PM »


I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.

I would say he's mostly right, but I do think Alu rough will result in more spin that what you have.
As for not recognizing any change, I would say that may because your game is evolving. At some point you will reach a plateau and gain a certain expectation from your string. You will find a new set of strings sparks you a bit and it feels good for awhile, and that feeling will fade. Also, string loses a lot of tension just between the time it's installed and the time you get out to play. If you pick up your racquet from the stringer today, and play tomorrow most of the tension it will initially lose will have been lost already. But it will continue to lose tension over it's lifetime.

I'm going to use what I have until the technique is more consistent, it's good for a couple games then if I'm behind I tend to go back to my old habits! Very hard to trust new techniques for me. I guess I just need to work on it, which I do.

Offline dmastous

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2007, 05:37:32 PM »


I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.

I would say he's mostly right, but I do think Alu rough will result in more spin that what you have.
As for not recognizing any change, I would say that may because your game is evolving. At some point you will reach a plateau and gain a certain expectation from your string. You will find a new set of strings sparks you a bit and it feels good for awhile, and that feeling will fade. Also, string loses a lot of tension just between the time it's installed and the time you get out to play. If you pick up your racquet from the stringer today, and play tomorrow most of the tension it will initially lose will have been lost already. But it will continue to lose tension over it's lifetime.

I'm going to use what I have until the technique is more consistent, it's good for a couple games then if I'm behind I tend to go back to my old habits! Very hard to trust new techniques for me. I guess I just need to work on it, which I do.

That's best. I've always said you should maximise you potential before you start tinkering with equipment. I knew a guy who had a Dunlap racquet that had lead tape and a costly string job. He was constanly looking to improve his game through technology. However the guy was at best a 3.0 player looking at his strokes. It was pathetic. I told him he was trying to shoot at a moving target.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)

Offline Swish

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #37 on: October 07, 2007, 08:20:00 PM »


I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.

I would say he's mostly right, but I do think Alu rough will result in more spin that what you have.
As for not recognizing any change, I would say that may because your game is evolving. At some point you will reach a plateau and gain a certain expectation from your string. You will find a new set of strings sparks you a bit and it feels good for awhile, and that feeling will fade. Also, string loses a lot of tension just between the time it's installed and the time you get out to play. If you pick up your racquet from the stringer today, and play tomorrow most of the tension it will initially lose will have been lost already. But it will continue to lose tension over it's lifetime.

I'm going to use what I have until the technique is more consistent, it's good for a couple games then if I'm behind I tend to go back to my old habits! Very hard to trust new techniques for me. I guess I just need to work on it, which I do.

That's best. I've always said you should maximise you potential before you start tinkering with equipment. I knew a guy who had a Dunlap racquet that had lead tape and a costly string job. He was constanly looking to improve his game through technology. However the guy was at best a 3.0 player looking at his strokes. It was pathetic. I told him he was trying to shoot at a moving target.

It makes sense, I know what the racket will do, so if there is any change it will be my form, if I keep changing how the racket plays I won't be sure where the change is coming from. Thanks!

Online monstertruck

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #38 on: October 08, 2007, 06:15:29 AM »
Thanks D!
I thought gut also lost it's tension after a few weeks. :Confused:  Thanks for the info.
Must be time for me to look into USRSA membership/certification......again. :whistle:

Everything looses tension over time and use. But there is no synthetic string that comes close to gut when it comes to, well, anything. Playabilty, power, and significantly tension loss.
Think of it this way. What is gut? It's usually made from sheep or cow intestine fiber (the greener the grass the better the gut ;-()). Intestines are designed by nature, or God, or whomever, to expand and contract over and over over the life of whatever beast it is in. Food comes in, it expands, food gets digested it contracts to it's orignal form. That's what the fiber is designed for and no synthetic fiber comes close to it when it comes to expanding and contracting to its original form.

Well, that sure makes sense!!!  Is there a particular gut you prefer and what is the average play time per string job?

I haven't enough experience to have a preference, I talk to a master stringer and let him decide, I wanted to try ALU rough to get more spin, but he told me the strings won't effect the amount of spin, it's all in the technique, and save my money. Right now I get tremendous spin by changing my technique, I only have to work on moving my body as one unit. Like a great bagua zhang grandmaster told me, when one thing moves everything moves.
 I play 1 or 2 times a week, each one is 2.5 to 3.5 hours. I've had the current strings in there for 3 months and haven't noticed any change in the racquet so I'm happy, maybe next year I'll try another combination with my own input. The racquet may be changing but so is my game and technique so it's hard to tell.
What on earth is a "great bagua zhang grandmaster"? :Confused:
CONK da ball!!!

Offline OSU Buckeye

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Re: Another newbie
« Reply #39 on: October 08, 2007, 08:46:30 AM »
I was under the impression that most tension loss happens fairly soon after the string job and then only minor tension loss over the rest of the following weeks and more.  Also does it help to hit sooner than later after a string job as far as tension loss is concerned?