Author Topic: The 'Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker-Roddick' Fan Thread  (Read 60062 times)

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Offline Chris1987

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #240 on: July 03, 2008, 03:41:07 PM »
4 straight weeks is a lot though however much he loves it, however thats only the case if you're making the weekend of them all  :)~
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Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #241 on: July 06, 2008, 12:07:25 PM »
There's a thread on MTF called "Tennis Songs that should be released". SO i wrote this song sets to ABBA's Mamma Mia.

I've been cheated by you since you entered a slump
So I made up my mind, I won't be the next chump
Look at me now, will I ever learn?
I don't know how but I suddenly lose control
There's a fire within my soul
Just one ace and I can hear a bell ring
One more smash and I forget everything, o-o-o-oh

Andy Roddick, here I go again
My my, how can I resist you?
Andy Roddick, does it show again?
My my, just how much I've missed you
Yes, I've been sad for you...
Blue since you lost in round two
Why, why did Connors ever let you go?
Andy Roddick, now I really know,
My my, I could never let you go.

I've been angry and sad about the things that you do
I can't count all the times that I thought your were through.
And when you lose, when you slam the door
on the hearts of your fans who want you winning more
You know that I'm not that strong.
Just one ace and I can hear a bell ring
One more smash and I forget everything, o-o-o-oh

Andy Roddick, here I go again
My my, how can I resist you?
Andy Roddick, does it show again?
My my, just how much I've missed you
Yes, it is so sad and true
the whole men's tour laughing at you
Why, why did Benhabiles ever let you go?
Andy Roddick, even if I say
Bye bye, leave me now or never
Andy Roddick, it's just game you play
Bye bye doesn't mean forever

Andy Roddick, here I go again
My my, how can I resist you?
Andy Roddick, does it show again?
My my, just how much I've missed you
Yes, watching you is no fun..
don't think you will win Wimbledon
Why, why did Gilbert ever let you go
Andy Roddick, now I really know
my my, even I would let you go.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2008, 05:03:08 PM by BGT »



Offline jeffrx

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #242 on: July 06, 2008, 07:00:44 PM »
Roddick is becoming a non-factor in tennis these days.   I'm ready to throw in the towel with this dude.     
Lots of people make passes at me, I'm a tennis player!

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #243 on: July 11, 2008, 01:12:08 AM »
Andy's fall schedule (so far). Andy could really make a move for the top 5 after the USO because he played one match from the USO until Shanghai and DC last year (Lyon -- lost first round to Santoro). He's got NO points to defend and could really rack some up with some decent showings, especially at the Masters. :)

Beijing: Sept 22 (see -- He's going to Beijing this year! :rofl_2: )
Tokyo: Sept 29
« Last Edit: July 11, 2008, 01:13:22 AM by BGT »



Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #244 on: July 11, 2008, 10:06:31 PM »
Andy :blue:

Roddick Pulls Out of Aces Match Due to Injury

 

(July 11, 2007) - - - Andy Roddick, who was scheduled to play for the St. Louis Aces July 12, will not be coming to St. Louis due to an injury.

Aces General Manager Dani Apted said she received word late Thursday night that Roddick’s injury has become too severe to play or travel to St. Louis this weekend.

In a statement issued by Andy Roddick: "I love World TeamTennis and Billie Jean and I'm so sorry that I will be unable to be in St. Louis on Saturday night. Due to the same injury that I've been rehabbing since mid-May, I'm seeing a specialist and have been advised not to travel. I want to wish my teammates good luck and hope they get a win!"

"Of course, we are devastated, but we understand that Andy is injured and won’t be here so we have to do what is best for our fans and supporters,” Apted said. “We have no way to control this situation and due to this late notice we are left scrambling for a replacement.

“We ask the Aces fans to continue to support our great team, who will still be playing a match this Saturday, July 12 against the Kansas City Explorers. Our team – Jasmin Woehr, Jelena Pandzic, Travis Rettenmaier and Vladzimir Ignatik – needs your support.”

-------------------

He's got quarterfinalist points to defend in Canada. Get better Andy. ://
« Last Edit: July 11, 2008, 10:07:16 PM by BGT »



Offline Chris1987

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #245 on: July 12, 2008, 02:10:20 AM »
He needs to recover from this injury pretty quickly now as this is his biggest time of the year coming up and with Toronto just 8 days away its almost upon us. Should be just a sensible precaution pulling out of a WTT match
« Last Edit: July 12, 2008, 02:11:29 AM by Chris1987 »
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Offline euroka1

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #246 on: July 12, 2008, 04:25:49 AM »
Anyone know what is really going on here?  :confused1:
If there was one thing that was clear at both Queen's and Wimbledon it is that there is nothing wrong with his serving shoulder as evidenced by his serve. Sounds to me as if the problem is more in the head. 
Or maybe he just wants to stay home.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2008, 04:28:36 AM by euroka1 »

Offline euroka1

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #247 on: July 15, 2008, 04:34:23 AM »
This was in TennisReporters.net this morning.

http://www.tennisreporters.net/roddick_071408.html

What do people think? Seems to me it is a bit extreme. I believe the problem is more one of will. Despite all that is said, my guess is that Andy is getting tired of celebrity and would just like to settle down.  He can keep going as long as he likes but let's have a bit of enthusiasm.  :grind dance:
Andy never did get to hit the courts at Indy this year.

=======================================================================

Roddick's Seven Stages of Grief
Reconstructing backhand is the only way Andy will reach top again


By Tom A. McFerson, Special to TennisReporters.net

After winning the U.S. Open in 2003, Andy Roddick fully expected his reign atop the men's game to be long and bountiful. Now, nearly five years later, it is clear that there was no Roddick reign, just a few months of keeping the throne warm between King Pete and King Roger.

Why was this? Some would argue that no one expected the emergence and dominance of Roger Federer. Others might argue that Roddick had more than his share of ill-timed injuries and unlucky bounces.

But when history is written, the lion's share of the blame should be placed squarely at the feet of Andy Roddick and his camp. The stagnation in the American's game - specifically his shaky backhand - was most at fault.

As the summer hard-court season begins and Roddick hits the courts in Indianapolis, the 25-year-old Roddick now barely finds himself in the top-5 conversation. This new reality has been difficult for the American, and he's clearly been going through his own lengthy Seven Stages of Grief as he begins to accept his place in the tennis world:


Shock. You can point to a few different time-periods or matches, but it appears to all start in earnest - the this-isn't-supposed-to-happen moment - with the stunning loss to 68th ranked Gilles Muller in the first round of the 2005 U.S. Open.
Up until that point, Roddick's key weakness - the backhand - was something only whispered about in the shadows of the tour. Muller's win, and his comments afterward ("I know he has sometimes problems to hit backhands when you go to the net, when you force him to the backhand.") cast a bright light on the soft underbelly of Roddick's game. Mix in the locale, the nigh-match atmosphere and the entire American-Express-Andy-has-lost-his-mojo ad campaign debacle, and the shock factor is there.

Denial. The length of time one spends in the denial stage can vary. For Roddick, it lasts from the Muller match through the first half of 2006. Losses begin to mount and the American continues to flounder in big matches. The response from Roddick: nothing to be concerned about. Finally, after reaching only one semi-final in his first nine tournaments of 2006, Roddick admits he has a problem.

Bargaining. Roddick finally relents - to a point - and begins making cosmetic changes to his game. The backhand issue, however, is only tangently addressed. He begins listening to the "experts" advising him to add more variety, to rush the net, and to slice the backhand. Roddick also hires Jimmy Connors as his head coach (demoting his brother John to the role of traveling coach) with the goal of relearning how to compete and win. Roddick begins working on almost every aspect of his game, but the one area that needs it most, his backhand only shows marginal improvement.

Guilt. Roddick and Jimbo split at the beginning of this year and his older brother is back in the full saddle,. The pangs of guilt due to bringing in Connors go away, but the problems with his game do not.
Anger. Roddick was clearly pissed after losing to Philip Kohlshrieber at the Aussie Open 2008. However, he won San Jose and then knocked of Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic to win Dubai. He finally scores another win over Federer in Miami, but then goes down to Nikolay Davydenko. Things are looking a little better, but then he misses almost the entire clay court season due to scheduling choices and a shoulder injury. The American decides to let it all ride on the grass court season.

Depression. The train wreck of all train wrecks. Trying to regain some - any - momentum, the American crashes and burns in the second round of Wimbledon last month, losing to a solid but unexceptional Janko Tipsarevic. Roddick seems devoid of energy and appears downright scared on the court. His entire game - backhand especially - totally desert him at key moments of the match. At his post-match press conference, a devastated Roddick looks as down as he ever has. The American slinks out of the All England Club, his confidence all but gone.

Acceptance and Hope. Roddick, hopefully, is edging his way towards this final stage. Only after Roddick fights his way through the first six stages can he reach this point.
And only after he has fully come to grips with where his game currently is - sputtering - will he be ready to make the radical changes that need to made.
After his second round loss to Tipsarevic, a demoralized Roddick blamed the result on wanting it (Wimbledon) too much. "It's like you want something so bad you almost squeeze too tight," he said after the match.
Surprisingly, the some of the media (the owner of this web site notwithstanding) bought this reasoning hook, line and sinker. No mention was made of the real reason Roddick lost that match. No mention of why Roddick is in the rut he's in.
Deep down, though, the American knows what the problem is. His backhand is killing him, and it's only going to get worse.

Fortunately, there is a way out. If he is ready and willing, the following six-point plan could lead Roddick out of the wilderness and deliver him to, if not the promised land, at least within shouting distance.
1. Commit to Reconstructing the Backhand. Enough dancing around the issue. The stroke needs to be totally reconstructed. Not tweaked. Not fine-tuned. Not massaged. Not adjusted. Reconstructed.
And Roddick needs to go on the record - publicly - that this is his intent.
The move is drastic, but it is not without precedent. Tiger Woods, unhappy with his strokes a few years back, took an enormous risk and reworked his entire swing. He came back stronger than ever.
There are no guarantees, however. Stroke reconstruction doesn't always turns out well. David Duvall (remember him?) followed the Woods example and now can barely get his golf ball airborne.
Fortunately, Roddick has the athletic ability to make the change work. It won't be fun, and it won't be pretty. The process will be painful and humiliating, but there is no other way.

2. Clear the Schedule. Roddick should finish out the summer season. He should play the Davis Cup semi-finals in Spain (the American team is a massive underdog on the red clay, so victory is unlikely) Then he should shut it down. No fall ATP Tour. No Paris, no Madrid, no Beijing. Roddick has very few points to defend after the US Open, so skipping these events will cost him, at most, a few ranking spots. This will be time well spent.

3. Hire a Two-Handed Backhand Specialist. One name comes to mind. Andre Agassi. Owner of one of the best two-handed backhands of all-time. His backhand is the model for kids all over the world.
It would take too much space to discuss all the issues that need to be addressed on Roddick's backhand side (grip, backswing, footwork, follow-through, attitude), but if anyone could analyze and fix these problems, it's Agassi. The questions is, would Agassi want to do it?

Roddick needs him, and that need will go along way with Agassi. Also, the idea isn't for a full-time coach. This would be more of a consulting project. A few months of heavy lifting, followed by a period of maintenance. The two men get along well, and Agassi, out of the game for a couple of years now, might find the project interesting and rewarding. A small way that he can help "save" American tennis.
In the commentator's booth last year during the Roddick-Federer U.S. Open quarterfinal, Agassi clearly grasped the problems and nuances of Roddick's backhand. Not only did he say some incredibly perceptive things about the stroke, but - reading between the lines - it sounded like he knew how to improve it.
If Roddick could get his backhand to even half of what Agassi's was, the pairing would be a success.
Other possibilities for the consulting gig: Jim Courier (could bang it with the best of them and active in the game right now); Mats Wilander (currently coaching Paul Henri-Mathieu); Wayne Ferreira (could rip the cover off the ball and lives in California).

4. Take it on the Road. Once they feel it is ready, Roddick should take the backhand out for a test drive at some Challengers and Futures. Two ground-rules: no big serving allowed, and no inside-out forehands. Roddick would have to fight and earn every point. Lots of grinding, lots of uncomfortable matches, and most importantly, lots of backhands.
Winning a Challenger without his monster serve, doing it only from the backcourt, will be the true test of whether the new backhand is taking hold.

5. Rejoin the Tour only when ready. If Roddick has to miss the Australian Open, so be it. If he has to miss Indian Wells, oh well. The backhand reconstruction is Roddick's last, best shot, at getting back to the top. And if there is some collateral damage along the way - with fans or Tour officials or sponsors - then that's the way it is.


6. Stick with it. The process won't be overnight. And it may get worse before it gets better. But if Roddick bails out before he gives the new backhand a real chance to flourish, then he'll be right back where he started.
And it won't be pleasant to watch.
   



« Last Edit: July 15, 2008, 04:37:34 AM by euroka1 »

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #248 on: July 15, 2008, 01:14:47 PM »
I really like that article, and it would be wonderful if Andy could read it and take it to heart.



Offline jeffrx

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #249 on: July 15, 2008, 03:02:38 PM »
this is kind of funny... :)  from ESPN.com

Andy Roddick Beat Me With a Frying Pan   
By Todd Gallagher
Special to Page 2
(Archive)
Updated: July 15, 2008, 12:13 PM ET
Comment

Think you've got enough game to volley with one of the world's best tennis players? Well, Page 2 is giving you the chance to trade shots with Andy Roddick. And we're even going to level the playing field a bit by making Roddick play ... with a frying pan.

Here's how Page 2's exclusive contest works: Enter by sending us a short video of you re-enacting a great highlight from sports history; it can be any sport from any year, and we'll award extra points if you incorporate a frying pan into your video. Make sure to check out the official contest rules, and don't use any copyrighted materials (music, TV clips, etc.) in your presentation. Page 2's judges will pick the finalists, and next month, our readers will select the grand-prize winner. That winner and a guest will fly to Andy Roddick's charity tournament in December and get the chance to play a match against Roddick.

The whole idea comes courtesy of Todd Gallagher's book, "Andy Roddick Beat Me With a Frying Pan -- Taking the Field with Pro Athletes and Olympic Legends to Answer Sports Fans' Burning Questions." To get you fired up, here's an excerpt from the 2007 book, focusing on Gallagher's battle with a pan-wielding Roddick.

Good luck.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


How did Todd Gallagher (left) fare against Andy Roddick and his frying pan? Read on.
Andy Roddick is a 25-year-old professional tennis player with 23 ATP titles to his credit, including the 2003 U.S. Open. Having spent his entire childhood training on the tennis court, sometimes for as many as 10 hours a day, he now has the ability to strike shots at speeds and with a level of accuracy that are almost impossible to comprehend. Andy has hit the fastest serve ever recorded, at 155 mph. If you had never played tennis before and hit with Andy, you would immediately understand that you were dealing with an incredible athlete. You wouldn't win a point and would possibly get injured by one of his serves.

I play tennis, too! While Roddick was once the world's No. 1 player, I made it to No. 2 on my high school team the season I played. Like Roddick, I can hit all of the shots. Unlike Andy, I can't hit any of them particularly well or with any kind of power or placement. I hit my first serve around 105 mph, which is slower than his second serve, and it doesn't have anywhere near the kind of action Andy's ball does. I pray to God the first one goes in, because if it doesn't, I could easily double fault.

The best way to make the comparison is to say that there's no comparison. Roddick spends his time plowing through opponents in major tournaments, while I spend too much time on my couch watching him do so. Still, like Roddick, I am a tennis player and a competitive guy, so although I never had the dedication or the talent to play at his level, I wanted to know what a win over a player as great as he is felt like. In my heart I knew that I had what it took to beat him. I just had to figure out an unfair way to do it.

As to how unfair, well, that would take some thought. While someone with no tennis experience would not win a point from Andy in a set, I probably wouldn't have a prayer of winning more than a point or two either. This is, in part, because I'm not that good, but also because the difference between a recreational player and an actual pro might be greater in tennis than in any other sport.

I would venture to say Roddick is significantly better than the players who beat me so easily in high school, so if I wanted to be able to beat him and make it feel like a real win, I would have to come up with a handicap that seemed reasonable enough, on the surface at least, to make Andy emotionally invested in the match.

• The first thought was to make Andy play with one hand tied behind his back.

• What if we made Andy wear an eye patch?

• What if Andy gave me the use of the doubles alleys?

• Ask Andy to play left-handed.

After too many hours of thought, finally I gave up and said, "Screw it, make him play with a frying pan."

First, even a player as great as Roddick would be hindered by having to lug around this heavy, cumbersome piece of hardware. Second, the skillet would severely limit his booming serves. Third, only one side of a frying pan can be used to strike the ball, meaning that he would have to flip over the pan every time he switched to his backhand. Fourth, a frying pan has no strings, taking away Roddick's ability to use a variety of spins that help him hit powerful and well-placed groundstrokes. Lastly, it would force him to expend a lot of mental energy to resist making bad "out of the frying pan" puns when he won a point.

On the appointed day, I arrived in Boca Raton, Fla., ready for battle.

We started rallying, and Roddick was, unfortunately, amazing. He was able to center the ball on the pan immediately and consistently put his shots deep in the court. Considering that a frying pan is heavier than a racket, has a smaller surface area, and has no strings, that he could hit the ball right away with no trouble is beyond belief. Although Ichiro might disagree, top tennis players, more than other athletes, have this kind of hand-eye coordination. I was getting a little concerned.

But as we continued to hit, it became clear Roddick had major difficulties to overcome. The main one was his inability to put spin on the ball. Hitting every shot flat may not have been a problem for his coach, Jimmy Connors, who struck everything on a line, but for any other tennis player in the world, not being able to use spin to control your power and depth is a real issue. It also meant Roddick had to abandon his typical grip on his strokes, going from western to continental.

The backhand was a beast unto itself. Making solid contact with a frying pan is hard enough, but once you have to flip it over and coordinate the grip change, you're getting into unmanageable problems. Any shot to his backhand made for just too much work. This was an even bigger issue on volleys and the net game, where I was worried Andy would take control. In fact, volleying was eliminated entirely because of the shorter amount of time he had to make the flip to the backhand.

To Roddick's credit, though, he fought through these problems. Almost immediately he identified the need to stay at the baseline, and after only a couple of minutes of warmups he recognized that the backhand had to be avoided at all costs. Playing from the back court, he made a concerted effort to run around any ball hit to his backhand -- no simple feat, since I kept putting the ball to that side. "I see what you're trying to do, and I'm not going to let you do it," the defiant Roddick yelled to me. If not for his footwork, speed and anticipation, he would have been shanking backhands into the stands all day. As it turned out, the entire time we played he ended up hitting all but two shots with the forehand.

  • EnlargeESPN


Roddick wasn't able to put quite as much spin on the ball with the frying pan.
But ultimately, while Roddick consistently put the ball in the court, he wasn't able to hit shots with enough speed or accuracy to control points, which in this matchup would be a particular problem. I'm what in tennis circles is called a "push." Players of my style simply "push" the ball back to their opponent without any particular power, the idea being that if you keep the ball in play long enough, your A.D.D-riddled opponent, who wants to pretend he's Andy Roddick and hit the ball hard, will do something stupid and miss.

Roddick, however, actually was Roddick and was more concerned with winning than with being a tough guy on the tennis court. Recognizing the pan limited his options for aggressive shots, he attempted to match me at my own game.

The best tennis player in America did an impressive job keeping rallies going, but I didn't bail him out by making errors. My handicapping was on the money. Andy was good enough to think he had a chance, but I was in the driver's seat. As hard as he tried to keep the ball in the court, the frying pan I had saddled him with eventually did what I wanted it to. He started missing, and pretty soon I was cruising.

I was closing in on finishing off Andy when the unthinkable happened. Wanting to put on a show for the adoring (my word, not theirs) crowd, I let my ego get in the way and went for a big shot down the line that missed by inches. It was only one point, but I knew what my dad would say when he started giving me a hard time: Andy Roddick beat me with a frying pan.

Still, no matter what kind of nonsense I'd have to hear, I knew that if I closed out the game without further incident I'd show the world the full extent of my abilities … in other words, that I was just competent enough at tennis to defeat a man who was using a frying pan.

On match point, Roddick slapped a forehand wide and the guy with the racket won. Oh, and the guy with the racket also did some exaggerated fist pumps and gave high fives to the crowd, yelling something about the "heart of a champion." Of this display it was later said, "That was an appropriate victory celebration for someone who had just won Wimbledon." I finally knew what it was like to beat Andy Roddick: embarrassing.

But I didn't care how embarrassing it was; I finally had my win over a top player, and even better, in the process I drew blood. Defeated, Roddick slammed the pan to the ground in frustration, breaking the handle. Andy, don't you realize a good artist never blames his instrument?

I'd like to say my sensational victory was a testament to my greatness, but really it was just my brilliant strategy. With a frying pan, no player, even one as great as Roddick, can hit the shots needed to defeat a decent player who keeps the ball in the court at all costs. There are just too many ways to make an error with a frying pan, and our points ended with Roddick either being caught in an incredibly awkward hitting situation or being forced to go for an aggressive shot that he didn't yet have the feel for making. However, against a more aggressive/dumb player who made unforced errors, even someone on the intermediate level, Roddick would have taken over. He'd have patiently dinked his opponent to death and run down balls until the player went for too big of a shot and missed.

You may find this hard to believe, but as impressed as I was with myself, I came away more impressed with Roddick. Even using a frying pan, he could make almost any high school tennis team and be considered a solid player at all but the best of programs … although this would unquestionably be very awkward given the age difference and his insistence on using the pan and all. That he was this good after just 15 minutes of practice (or a week, depending on who you believe) was remarkable.

"I think if I had more time to practice, I would improve," Roddick said. "A lot of the shots I didn't quite know how to hit with the frying pan. You saw on that volley I hit that went flying. The adjustment to the backhand was the biggest thing. I kept running around it but you can't do that forever. If I could fiddle around with it, I'd be OK."

Roddick within a week would most likely start limiting his errors and punishing floaters. In a month or so, he'd be keeping most every ball in the court that he was willing to play conservatively. Pretty soon he'd adjust to the loss of his biggest weapon, his powerful serve, and learn to minimize the problems with the backhand, returning serves, and dealing with hard-hit balls.

And if he became so obsessed with beating me in a rematch that he dropped off the tour for a year to spend hours a day hitting forehand after forehand, learning to use the edges of the pan to slice the ball, mastering how to flip that pan quickly enough for volleys, learning whether a nonstick pan would be more effective than a traditional one … he would be declared criminally insane and possibly institutionalized. And is finally being able to beat me really worth all that, Andy?
Lots of people make passes at me, I'm a tennis player!

Offline euroka1

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #250 on: July 15, 2008, 10:49:29 PM »
This was in TennisReporters.net this morning.

http://www.tennisreporters.net/roddick_071408.html

What do people think? Seems to me it is a bit extreme. I believe the problem is more one of will. Despite all that is said, my guess is that Andy is getting tired of celebrity and would just like to settle down.  He can keep going as long as he likes but let's have a bit of enthusiasm.  :grind dance:
Andy never did get to hit the courts at Indy this year.



I really like that article, and it would be wonderful if Andy could read it and take it to heart.


Thanks BGT. Yes, it would be good if he saw it. But I don't think he has the strength of character to follow such a drastic remedy. Age is starting to become a factor now as well. I never pay much attention to what Andy says; only to what he does on court and that indicates to me that the spirit has gone from his game.  :(

« Last Edit: July 15, 2008, 10:50:53 PM by euroka1 »

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #251 on: July 19, 2008, 01:35:53 PM »
Andy's personal update:

“Hey guys…it’s been a while,….just been so focused on getting healthy and back on the court. We are leaving for  Toronto  today…i’ve had some great results in Canada so we are all  pretty  excited to get back….It’s been really tough not competing  this  past month, but you cant force recovery…I guess the silver  lining  is since I’ve been home we have been working really hard on  the  Foundation Charity events..more exciting news to come on that.  Hope  you guys are enjoying the videos…when I get settled I’ll  crank
out a full update…time to go pack!”



Offline euroka1

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #252 on: July 19, 2008, 01:47:54 PM »
Andy's personal update:

“Hey guys…it’s been a while,….just been so focused on getting healthy and back on the court. We are leaving for  Toronto  today…i’ve had some great results in Canada so we are all  pretty  excited to get back….It’s been really tough not competing  this  past month, but you cant force recovery…I guess the silver  lining  is since I’ve been home we have been working really hard on  the  Foundation Charity events..more exciting news to come on that.  Hope  you guys are enjoying the videos…when I get settled I’ll  crank
out a full update…time to go pack!”


BGT, is he saying he didn't really compete at Wimbledon?  :confused1:  He says and writes some pretty inane things. I'm looking forward and hoping for better on court in Toronto.

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #253 on: July 19, 2008, 02:12:23 PM »
Well, we have to hope he's better since he has a rematch with his last 2 toughest grass opponents in the second round -- either Tipsy or Mahut. He's got to be sharp from point one unless he wants a repeat of IW.



Offline euroka1

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #254 on: July 19, 2008, 02:19:29 PM »
Well, we have to hope he's better since he has a rematch with his last 2 toughest grass opponents in the second round -- either Tipsy or Mahut. He's got to be sharp from point one unless he wants a repeat of IW.

Thanks BGT, you have me scurrying to look at the draw. :lmao:

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #255 on: July 20, 2008, 07:01:07 PM »
Jul 20th 2008
Roddick Ready for Rogers Cup

“We are all really excited to have Andy back here (at the Rogers Cup),” noted Tournament Director Karl Hale when he spoke with AR.com. “As the 2003 champion and a two-time finalist, Andy has a lot of fan base here.” Our number one American is seeded sixth and will return for his seventh appearance at this Masters Series Event to take on the opposition at Toronto’s Rexall Centre from July 19-27.

This Toronto/Montreal based event, which flip-flops locations every year, is the third oldest tennis tournament having been created in 1881 after Wimbledon and the US Open were established. Since then, there have been upgrades and enhancements, and in 2004, Toronto built the Rexall Centre which boasts a 12,500 seat Centre Court and also has a Grandstand stadium for the top matches. Though the fans couldn’t experience the Rexall Centre last year, Montreal was happy to welcome 182,252 fans through its gates, setting the new world record for high attendance at a week-long tournament. In addition to a different location this year, it also holds a new “time slot” on the Greatest Road Trip in Sports. Last year, the Rogers Cup was the second week in August, which Andy participated in after claiming his fifth Legg Mason title, but this year it is in mid-July.

“Andy has a very well-known serve, and the fans love to see it live,” Hale commented. Even though this is the second stop as part of the Olympus US Open Series, it will be Andy’s first go on the North American Decoturf hardcourts where he will be firing that serve through a tough draw. As the top 8 seeds got a first round bye, Andy’s second round match will be against the winner of the Tipsarovic (SER)/Mahut (FRA) match. Mahut was the 2007 Queen’s Club finalist who gave the Championships the greatest final it has ever seen with Andy prevailing at the very end.

Next, Andy could face Spain’s Tommy Robredo (12), followed by a quarterfinal showdown against Federer. Andy has two advantages here; he won their last encounter a few months ago and also claimed his first “W” over Fed at this very event back in 2003 on his way to the title. The semifinals could have compatriot James Blake (7) or Russia’s Nikolay Davydenko (4) standing across the net from Andy, then with either Nadal or defending champ Novak Djokovic as his finals opponent.

“Andy has a unique personality,” Hale said, “and fans are attracted to his on-court demeanor because he shows his emotions.” These characteristics will be revealed yet again as Andy hopes to reach and surpass last year’s quarterfinal showing against eventual champion Novak Djokovic, 7-6, 6-4.

“As a past champion here, Andy is well recognized and we are all looking for him to regain the title,” as are we.

Stay tuned to AR.com for everything Andy from Toronto. Go Andy!



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #256 on: July 20, 2008, 09:16:54 PM »
Roddick feeling healthy for 1st time in a while

Andy Roddick’s right shoulder feels healthier than it has in months, just in time for him to begin preparing for the U.S. Open.

Roddick is in the field at the Rogers Cup, which begins Monday in Toronto, part of the U.S. Open Series of hard-court tournaments leading up to the year’s last Grand Slam tournament.

He hasn’t played a match since losing to Janko Tipsarevic in the second round at Wimbledon on June 26. Roddick missed the French Open because of the bothersome shoulder.

“I feel good. I’ve been on the court a lot the last couple of weeks and I haven’t had to censor my practices at all,” he said in a conference call with reporters Sunday night. “I’ve been able to go as long as I want, as hard as I want, which is a good thing. I’m not short of practice, which is really good.”

He said it’s the best he’s felt since helping the United States beat France in the Davis Cup quarterfinals in April.
:yahoo:

Roddick won the 2003 U.S. Open and finished that season ranked No. 1. He is currently No. 6—and still in search of a second major championship.

Aiming to perform well at this year’s U.S. Open, which begins Aug. 25, he decided to skip the Beijing Olympics to concentrate on his hard-court game and avoid the long trip.

“Let me first say that it was probably one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make in my career. You normally don’t have to choose between two huge events,” Roddick said.

“My decision had nothing to do with lack of respect for the Olympics or anything like that. I completely am the biggest fan of it, and I’ll be a huge fan watching it from home. It had to do more with, at the end of my career, I want to have been making runs in Slams.”

Asked how important for him it would be to beat No. 1 Roger Federer, No. 2 Rafael Nadal or No. 3 Novak Djokovic at a Grand Slam tournament, Roddick said: “I mean, that’s kind of the next step. I feel like I had a lot of momentum going through April of this year, then kind of had a little bit of hard luck with the injury and stuff.

“I kind of almost feel like I’m starting again, you know?” he continued. “I’m starting a new season because I haven’t played that much.”



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #257 on: July 20, 2008, 09:17:22 PM »
OLYMPUS U.S. OPEN SERIES MEDIA CONFERENCE

July 20, 2008

Andy Roddick

TIM CURRY: Thank you for joining us this evening for our Olympus US Open Series conference call with two-time series champion, Andy Roddick. The 2008 US Open Series marks the fifth year of the series which links ten summer tournaments to the US Open, creating a cohesive six-week summer season for the ATP and Sony Ericsson WTA tournaments in North America.
The first week of the series concluded earlier today in Indianapolis and Stanford. Andy is entered in each of the next four Olympus US Open Series men's events: This week's Rogers Masters in Canada, the Western and Southern Financial Group Masters in Cincinnati, the Countrywide Classic in Los Angeles, and the Legg Mason Classic in Washington, D.C.
The series will then conclude as traditionally with the final week with the Pilot Pen in New Haven. All of this, of course, is leading up to the US Open. We will ask the operator to give instructions for asking questions.

Q. Could you give us a quick update on what your health is and what's been hurt and how things are feeling overall?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I feel great, actually. I'm probably healthy for the first time since before Rome. Probably the first time since our Davis Cup match against France.
I feel good. I've been on the court a lot the last couple of weeks and I haven't had to, you know, censor my practices at all. I've been able to go as long as I want, as hard as I want, which is a good thing. I'm not short of practice, which is a really good.

Q. What was the injury that kept you out of World Team Tennis? Was it the same one that you had in Rome?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, it's just the shoulder that was bothering me. But more so than anything, I just wanted to continue my rehab program, and, you know, I felt like we were getting on top of it and I didn't want to interrupt momentum as far as that went.

Q. Let me ask you straight out - how important do you think to American tennis is it to get an American guy to win the US Open again? How would you reflect on that?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I mean it's always important. I don't know how to compare it to last year or the year before. You know, I think with, you know, actually this Nadal-Federer generating the type of buzz they did at Wimbledon, and even on American kind of sports talk shows and TV shows and whatnot, it was talked about as one of the first stories for three or four days afterwards. I think that's good for tennis in general even in America, and the ratings were great in America.
I think the most important thing in tennis is rivalries. And the more people can you get into those rivalries the better. So instead of just having a Nadal-Federer, you know thing going back and forth, if we can get a couple more names in there, I think that's good for tennis.

Q. You have wins over Novak this year and Roger, but how important would it be to you to get a win in a major over Djokovic or Roger or Rafa?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I mean, that's kind of the next step. I feel like I had a lot of momentum going through April of this year, then you know kind of had a little bit of hard luck with the injury and stuff.
I kind of almost feel like I'm starting again, you know? I'm starting a new season because I haven't played that much. I've only played a couple matches in the past couple months. You know, that's the next step.

Q. Finally, at Wimbledon you spoke about how the pressure is coming from within you, can you talk about that dynamic within yourself? What kind of pressures do you feel at this point in your career?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I was feeling a lot of different pressures at Wimbledon just because I expected myself to perform and I wanted to perform in a big tournament, even though I maybe, I might have had a reason not to be there. So you're fighting a battle of wanting to do well, but then, you know, still not being prepared and not having the repetitions in, so.
It showed. It showed in my practices and in my matches. I was probably really frustrated with that. I feel physically prepared now, which is big for confidence.
So right now it's just a matter of getting out there. You can't replicate a match situation in practice, but you can get your reps in and train your muscle memory and so on and so forth. So now it's just a matter of I'm playing the four weeks. It's just a matter of going out there and playing each day so it happens again.

Q. Obviously, travel is a huge part of your job and I understand the decision to skip the Olympics was made to put you in the best position of winning the US Open. Could you elaborate at all on how you viewed the pros and cons of that sort of commitment? Going to Beijing and what the tradeoff was there?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, absolutely. Let me first say that it was probably one of the most difficult decisions I've had to make in my career. You normally don't have to choose between two huge events.
My decision had nothing to do with lack of respect for the Olympics or anything like that. I completely am the biggest fan of it, and I'll be a huge fan watching it from home. It had to do more with at the end of my career I want to have been making runs in slams.
So I felt the best way to do that is to play a lot in the hard court season and get my body ready for it. Especially with everything that's gone on. I didn't feel like a trip to Beijing, you know, followed by playing a first round match five days later at the US Open was the best preparation for Flushing.

Q. None of us are elite athletes and few of us have made a 12-hour trip to Beijing. Could you just talk about for an athlete at your level what sort of difficulties is presented by jet lag at that scale?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I guess it would be like trying to figure out, I guess, forcing yourself to sleep at about 5:00 in the evening, waking up at 10:00 in the morning and making it to, you know, 3:00 in the afternoon the next day and expecting to play also. I'm not really sure how to put that in there.
But then you have to put in all the extracurriculars that go on at the Olympics as well. It's not like you're taking a car five minutes to the courts. You know, there are huge amounts of traffic and security and buses and, you know, there is a lot that goes into it.
I felt the better preparation for me would be to stick here with the similar court conditions and so on and so forth. But, obviously, the fact that it's on the other side of the world played a big part in that.

Q. I'm curious, it seems to me that these US Open Series tournaments are really trying to accomplish two things; one is to try and win, and you have had a great success in these. But you're also trying to make sure you're playing at peak level by the time you get to New York if you're not already there. I'm curious how you are able to kind of accomplish both things and whether sometimes there are sort of opposite agendas to some degree?
ANDY RODDICK: I don't think so. I don't think you're going to have anybody saying, you know what, I played well and won a bunch of tournaments in the summer therefore that's a detriment to my chances at the Open.
Every time I've played well at the Open, I've played well in the lead-up events. I don't see how playing well all summer and trying to win events can hurt your preparation for the US Open.

Q. Aside from just making sure you're 100% and ready health-wise, is there anything specific you're trying to work on in terms of your game for New York?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I think the pace of the court in New York allows you to play a little bit more aggressively. It's probably one of the faster courts on tour, so that helps me out. I just need to get forward and get the repetitions in so I have confidence and playing aggressively.

Q. Why do you think you've been able to be so successful at the Legg Mason Classic and do you see that success continuing this year?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I hope so. I don't know if there's anything in particular. I think it's the time of the year and the conditions. I don't mind the hot weather. Hard court's probably my favorite surface. I've always kind of played well in the North American summer swing. Obviously, the D.C. tournament is a big part of that.

Q. Do you look forward to the Legg Mason tournament every year? Or how do you go about stepping up to the Legg Mason tournament?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I've always enjoyed playing there. I had my first ever really good pro tournament there when I was 17, back in 2000. I think I've won it three times now. You know, when you have success like that at a place, even just stepping on the grounds there, you have a certain sense of confidence. You know, it's always been a big part of my US Open preparation and hopefully it will continue to be that.

Q. I wanted to follow up about the Olympics. I know Greece isn't Beijing. But how was the turn around for you? I know there are some different circumstances, but how difficult was it in '04?
ANDY RODDICK: It was tough. Coming back on short notice, it was pretty tough. I think I definitely remember that. I don't know if my body was in the greatest shape for that tournament. I was playing good tennis at the time, but I remember feeling a little bit beat up before that Open. You know, that probably played into my decision as well.

Q. Didn't you stay to watch Mardy or were you gone by then?
ANDY RODDICK: No, I stayed. There was actually decent practice there. No one was going straight to New York from there. They were either playing in New Haven or whatever it was, and no one would have been in New York yet.
So there were a bunch of players there, so my best practice was there in Greece until the end. And, obviously, the fact that Mardy's a close friend and was having one of the tournaments of his life, I stayed for that as well.

Q. I know you're going to be pretty busy this summer not probably a lot of time to be glued to the TV set. But if there is one event or one race in the Olympics, is there something that you're going to be into? Do you know some of the swimmers at all from Austin? Some of those guys?
ANDY RODDICK: You know, there's a huge swimming program there. I think Phelps' run -- he's always kind of an Olympic legend. He's so young and he has a shot at so many more medals this year. I'm big into track and field and the swimming. I think those are probably the events that make the Olympics.

Q. We can see the ranking here at the top change pretty soon, I guess we could see a change. As a former number one, what do you think is the mental significance of earning or losing that top spot?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I think the biggest thing about getting the number one, I don't think anybody doubts that Nadal's probably he's had a better career than a lot of people who have been number one, myself included.
So I don't know if anybody views him as someone who hasn't been a number one or anything like that. So I don't think it's going to be a huge deal in the locker room as far as the ranking goes. I feel like a lot of us feel like Rafa is probably going to get there sometime in his career. Now he's just kind of closing in on it.
But I think the biggest thing as a player about getting to that spot that it can't be taken away. You know, that is something that every time there is a career high ranking, it's a good number to look at.

Q. Did you get a chance to watch them play in Wimbledon?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. I mean, it was great, you know. I think there were so many story lines going in and so much hype. Then to have that final live up to it and to have kind of Rafa dig in and force his will at the beginning. I think Roger showed people a lot coming from two sets down and showed a lot of heart, which is an underrated part of his game just because a lot of times it looks really easy to him, and then the drama with the light going away.
You know, just all of that. It's all great for tennis. I think we needed a final like that. It's probably going to be the match most remembered so far in their rivalry.

Q. Since Marat Safin is going to be here in D.C. with you, I'm wondering two things about him. To what extent did you pay any attention to the run he had at Wimbledon? And if you did or didn't, could you speak -- he seems to so much rise and fall on his degree of confidence which seems so volatile. I'm wondering if you could speak to the element that confidence plays in the way you approach a match?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, yeah. I think every person out here can play. I think the difference between someone being in the Top 10 and the Top 5 is being able to win those matches when they're not playing well.
You're never going to see anybody who kind of gave up on Marat's talent. But also in Marat's case, I think injuries have a lot to do with it. If you're out for an extended period of time coming back, you're wondering if you can get back to that place. You take a loss or two and you start wondering if it's going to be different.
I don't think people talk enough about that with Marat. He's had a rough go of things physically a little bit. So I don't think that tennis has ever been questioned with him.

Q. You traveled the world, obviously, all these different tournaments in give countries. What is special about the Open? Is it your favorite tournament? What makes it so special when you go out there?
ANDY RODDICK: I don't think any other tournament in the world has that kind of almost rock show kind of feel to it. Night session at the Open is probably the most electric atmosphere that you're going to find in our sport.
I remember last year when I played Roger, the feeling before, you can feel the energy in the air and the buzz. And I think just the fact that you're in New York and they almost put on a show at the US Open also with all the big acts and ceremonies and all the celebrities that come out and watch. It's not just a tennis tournament, it is an event in everyday life, and even in pop culture. So it's kind of transcended tennis, and it's just really fun to be a part of that.

Q. Did you watch the Wimbledon final from home on the couch, or were you out with friends? Where did you take it in?
ANDY RODDICK: I watched the first part of it. I was up at my fiance's Parents house. I got to watch the first set and a half. Then I took a flight home and got to watch the last little bit when I landed at the airport. So I actually watched the last half of it at the airport.

Q. Was it fun watching with the crowd in the airport? Was that kind of a kick?
ANDY RODDICK: There weren't a lot of people there. I rushed off the plane and had about 20 text messages on updates from the match. I kind of just ran to the TV and settled in and watched the end of it.
The coolest part about it is it's just great for tennis. The next morning I go and get my bagel and my coffee. Everyone's coming up to me and wondering about the match and talking about it and making comments about it. Wanting to know what I thought. That's never really been the case before. It really was different. I was long gone. But to have people excited about it outwardly was pretty cool.
TIM CURRY: Thanks, Andy, for taking the time before playing this week in Canada, and that will conclude our call.



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #258 on: July 20, 2008, 09:49:23 PM »
OLYMPUS U.S. OPEN SERIES MEDIA CONFERENCE

July 20, 2008

Andy Roddick

Q. Did you get a chance to watch them play in Wimbledon?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. I mean, it was great, you know. I think there were so many story lines going in and so much hype. Then to have that final live up to it and to have kind of Rafa dig in and force his will at the beginning. I think Roger showed people a lot coming from two sets down and showed a lot of heart, which is an underrated part of his game just because a lot of times it looks really easy to him, and then the drama with the light going away.
You know, just all of that. It's all great for tennis. I think we needed a final like that. It's probably going to be the match most remembered so far in their rivalry.



Thanks for posting this interview.  I especially liked this part!

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #259 on: July 24, 2008, 07:52:48 PM »
Roddick lost to Cilic today.  He needs to step it up somehow.  There is more than just one player ahead of him now and I see him dropping in the rankings even more.  Too much and he is going to start getting worse draws at slams and such.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
Scott Baker
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