Author Topic: The 'Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker-Roddick' Fan Thread  (Read 61038 times)

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Offline Dallas

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #320 on: January 27, 2009, 11:29:12 PM »
Keep posting.
Post pictures
Post whatever about Roddick.  You'll eventually get to page 17.  Uhm...what page are we on in the Roger thread? I have to go look! :innocent:

Offline Dallas

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #321 on: January 27, 2009, 11:31:46 PM »
Hey!  My post got you to page 17!  Of course, we're on page 267 over on the Roger thread. :innocent:  If anyone's counting. :innocent:

Offline pawan89

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #322 on: January 28, 2009, 04:11:46 PM »
A good article of the difference between Roddick and Federer. It's long. He explains why he likes Roddick but it does bring a new light to an often conflicting point regarding Roger (that seperates the haters vs. lovers)
On a vague level I do kinda agree.

It's about Roddick by the way..

http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2009/01/rodd.html

Quote
Howdy, folks. I got home from DC late last night, after attending a memorial service and reception in honor of my late friend, Jim Range. This was one of those services that you wish would never end, it was so full of wonderful stories, laughter, tears, the whole nine. What can you say about a guy whose second-in-command at TRCP, George Cooper, said that working for and with Jim made him a. . . happier man? Not a wealthier, or more successful, or more powerful person, but a. . . happier man.

Jim was known for his, er, colorful language, and it was impossible to ignore that in the tributes to him - so here was this enormous tent (pitched at the Fletcher's Cove boathouse on the Potomac, one of Jim's haunts) filled with proper Washingtonians and their children of all ages getting an earful of Jim stories, which invariably contained Jim's salty language. A highlight: Senator Fred Thompson described how both of them were part of a group of Tennesseans who went to Washington "hoping to make a mark on the world, and hoping to do some good."  He said that while all of these fellows from the hills and hollers were lawyers, Jim was the only one who ended up representing only people he. . . liked. And when the Senator joked that if Jim had the Senator's agent, he could become the next Marlboro man, Jim immediately replied, "How about I take your agent - but also keep my anonymity?"

On the way back from the capital, I checked my Blackberry and learned that Andy Roddick had advanced with a win over Novak Djokovic, and will meet Roger Federer in the Australian Open semis. It's funny, I always liked Roddick for some of the same reasons I loved my friend Jim Range. Each is, or was, a man who wears his emotions on his sleeve (that isn't a virtue, in and of itself; I've done my fair share of eye-rolling when some characters begin to share), tackles questions and issues head-on, speaks plainly and unequivocally, lacks pretense, has a sense of humor, and tends to engage others in a direct way. It's a generalization, and thus a little dangerous, but I think of these qualities, and the sum they produce, as distinctly "American," although the truth is probably that this type of man or woman is universal, but enjoys a more robust and favorable climate for success in the U.S.

It's a pity that the rivalry between Federer and Roddick is so one-sided. The most interesting thing about their relationship is that in the period before Rafael Nadal emerged as a world-class threat, Federer's superiority prevented Roddick from winning a few more majors. It's hard to be precise about these things, but every once in a while you get this situation. I shudder to think of how many more majors Ken Rosewall might have won had Rod Laver not been around to throttle him. And let's be honest about this - you don't think of Federer "overshadowing" Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin, Nikolay Davydenko or even Nadal, circa 2006, quite the same way as you think of him overshadowing. . . Andy Roddick.

That's partly because the contrast between the two players is compelling, and in a way that's even more sharply focused than the differences between Federer and Nadal. Not that I'm complaining about the rivalry we have - it's flat-out glorious. But Roddick-Federer seems laden with contrasts and associations, many of them quasi-cultural, that seem easier to articulate. And the difference between the two men seems to trigger our urge to judge or favor them based on what they represent to a deeper, if not more passionate, degree than does the contrast between Federer and Nadal.

Personally, I always felt that the northern European (Federer) vs. Mediterranean (Nadal) aspects of this generation's definitive rivalry are rich, but every time I comment on them I end up accused of stereotyping. The only thing that really bugs me about that criticism is that what might be called Fear of Stereotyping also leads to the destruction of any meaningful sense of diversity and, at least for me, it makes the rivalry less multi-layered. If we're all just unique atoms in a human cluster, our functional notion of diversity (and Lord knows we talk about it enough) is weak, redundant, and, ultimately, useless. If we're not representative, to some degree, there's no point in savoring or defining different views and approaches to life, even though letting the cart get ahead of the horse is a mistake none of us should make. That is, what a player represents should never overshadow his unique nature.

This, I think, is precisely the mistake many make with Roddick. The things he represents - the triumph of power over skill, the ascendancy of determination over talent, the conquest of artistry by self-belief coupled with that bane of all our existences, work. . . those victories somehow don't seem right. It's especially easy to go down this road if you look at tennis through the aesthetic rather than the athletic prism. For example, how often does a silver-medal winning high jumper get criticized for getting over the bar in his or her own way? Did the advent of the Fosbury Flop send track-and-field fans into a tizzy or, more appropriately, now that it's the universal approach to the high-jump, does anyone truly mourn the passing of the old, hurdling approach that all high jumpers once practiced?

One of the funny things about this is that most of the people who feel an antipathy toward Roddick seem to forget that all the triumphs listed above are, in fact, imaginary. Roddick's matches with Federer have, if anything, produced the opposite result in each category. This is one of the reasons that Roddick fans - and apologists, like me, although heaven knows Roddick doesn't need me to speak for him - are living in hardened bunkers. They sense something disingenuous and deeply unfair in the standard-issue complaints against Roddick; they're using this big, raw-boned, boyish kid as a canvas on which to paint their prejudices in colors that are deemed acceptable because of their intellectual context.

But where is it written that skill is a higher virtue than power (or a lower one, for that matter)? If you believe it is, you ought to try splitting a log with a scalpel instead of an axe. We all admire and appreciate talent, right? By contrast, determination is a dull virtue - an insidious field-leveler that, among other things, often leaves us wondering how so-and-so got to be Assistant Vice-President, while the vastly more creative and intelligent so-and-so is still stuck in the cubicle. Well, perhaps determination is, in and of itself, a talent - as evidenced by the fact that so many otherwise talented people don't have it. In fact, in many it's the missing link. If it were the missing link in Andy Roddick, he would have spent his career somewhere in the second 50.

Tmf And then there's this "work" thing, especially when it's positioned as antagonistic to artistry. Let me offer a context-appropriate definition of a good "artist": A person who manages to disguise the incredibly hard work that has gone into his or her creation by the particular way he's structured and presented that work. Or put it this way: does anyone doubt the extent of work that The Mighty Fed has put into his seemingly effortless game, and if he has indeed done that, is his work somehow superior to the work of Roddick, or has he just married it to his other talents to create a more satisfying - and seemingly work-free - product?

I have to 'fess up here; I'm a big work guy. And the harder, dirtier and more dangerous the work is, the more it fascinates me, which is why my motor vehicle of choice is America's ultimate symbol of hard, physical work, the pick-up truck. This makes me pre-disposed to appreciating a tennis player who obviously seems to be. . . working. I'm glad I never believed that TMF's artistry has been achieved too easily, or with work-avoiding shortcuts, and it's also why the players who least move me, no matter how bewitching their games or personalities, are those who seem lazy. I can think of very few successful people in any field (including manufacturing prose), whose status isn't partly the fruit of simply working harder than their counterparts. It's not very romantic, I know. But there it is.

Anyway, despite these issues, the towering fact is that Roger Federer has owned Roddick, through almost their entire history. I would expect that to have created a little more sympathy for Roddick, given that his nominal virtues have been trumped by those of TMF. At the most shallow level of the discussion, the skilled artist has subjugated the brute and determined worker. But it's hard to be an American these days (although easier since last Tuesday), especially if you appear to represent the qualities that seems stitched a little more conspicuously into the American soul, or are accorded greater value and respect in this nation.

By the way, I thought Roddick's presser was a gem - a pretty good window on not just what he thinks and why he feels that way, but on how he meets the world (although the mirror of the press room can be a lot like the one at the funhouse). And it's interesting to compare his comments with the ones TMF made just a few hours later, after his own big win. Actually, a comparison of the comments themselves is less interesting to me than the contrast between the way they're delivered by the respective men.

The thing that comes across most clearly to me is TMF's instinct to qualify what he says, his search for nuance and a form of speech that seems fundamentally diplomatic. Curiously, his most unequivocal statement is the speculation - only semi-solicited - that Novak Djokovic wouldn't have quit the match against Roddick if he were up instead of down by two sets. TMF has become quite skilled at surgical criticism. He may couch his thoughts in pauses, digressions, tangents (you can almost hear him beeping as he backs up from a comment) and verbal ticks born of ambivalence (and a desire to see all points of view), but they're just anesthetics he injects us with. In the end, he always gets his point across.

For example, let's look at the way the two men responded to basically the same question - how they feel about the rule allowing trainers on the court, and the effect it has on the momentum of the match. In Federer's presser, the question contained the observation that he himself eschews calling the trainer out.

Roger Federer:

    Yeah, I mean, it's a fine line, isn't it?  We'll never find the perfect scenario for that.  What shall I say?  I never usually call the trainer.  Exactly.

    When I came out on the tour and I was young, back then the rule was different. You could take a toilet break any time you wanted except obviously between the two games you were on the court.  So you could basically take it at 6 5 in the third set.  So that's changed.  Now you can only take them on set breaks, which I think really works out well now.

    But then with the trainer, I guess it's a tough thing.  I really felt when I was coming up the young players abused it, especially against a player like me.  (They were) A little bit unsecure [sic] about finishing matches, you lose a set easy, and then you go to the toilet and call the trainer and strap your ankle.

    Next thing you know, you're twenty minutes extra out on the court. Things go through your mind. Then once I got out on center court, you know, I guess I got the respect I deserved.  People stop doing it against you. I think that's nice, in a way.

    Probably on the outside courts it's still being abused at times.  It's there to be used, so why not use it to give yourself a better chance to win?  You don't fly to Australia to not give it your best shot.

    I'm almost in favor to just say, you know what, if you're not fit enough, just get out of here. But if something really bad happens, okay, it is just unfortunate, I guess.  It's a tough call. I mean, I don't know. I guess we'll speak about it and see what happens.

Now, here's Roddick's response to a similar question:

    A: I would disagree with it for if it's for -  let me preface this so no one twists it:  Everything Novak did today was well within his rights and the rules. It's simply about my opinion of a rule.

    I don't think you should be able to [[get a massage?]], if you want to get something on a switchover for cramping [[presumably, salt tablets or some other ingestible aid]], I think that would be okay.  Actually, one of the trainers came and talked to me afterwards, and he said his idea is. . . if you're going to take that (injury timeout) for cramping, (take) an extended break, make it a rule that you have to do it before your own serve.  I thought that was a pretty well thought-out idea.

    But as for physical condition, it's very easy to say, you know, it's one injury, but you can get rubbed for a cramp. I looked over and I was confused, because I thought it was one injury per timeout, and I saw a calf, a neck, and an arm.  But I guess cramping is one condition.

    There's obviously some wiggle room, a little bit of gray area there.  Hopefully we'll be able to do something about it.  I think the (suggestion) that you have to take it before your own serve, and if you don't want to do that then you concede the game until it is your serve, I think that's a good idea.


There are a few interesting elements at play here, starting with the fact Federer tends to de-emphasize the personal nature of his response (even though his reply is much more personal than Roddick's) by using the second-person singular pronoun "you" instead of "I". Federer tries to objectify himself, and the situation, while still making a pronounced point about how the rules have been onerous on him, and how he overcame that less by using grievance procedures than, well, opening up a can of whupa** on everyone.

Federer tends to speak in code. He seems torn between the urge to be diplomatic and show forbearance, and to understand all points of view (including that of a theoretical journeyman who flew all the way to Melbourne). Yet he clearly thinks the rule is being abused, and he's not about to let that go unnoticed. And let's not forget, the guy he's standing up for here is Andy Roddick, although the codebook some of you are using undoubtedly will suggest that what he's doing is trashing Djokovic and the entire hungry upstart gestalt.

By contrast, Roddick tackles the question in a straight-forward fashion, while taking pains to ensure that he's not directly insulting Djokovic. Roddick's focus is on the rule itself, and how it is applied. In this instance, I like the way Roddick handled the question, and while I don't believe it was Federer's best moment in a presser (nor was it his fight to wage on that given day), this is a pretty good (or is it extreme?) example of his tendency to speak in code, to rely on nuance and innuendo, but in a skilled way that doesn't give short shrift to to his own rights and grievances, and the authority he feels he's earned by virtue of being such a great champion. Reading his comments, you could almost be lulled into missing this almost comically un-Federerian quip: I'm almost in favor to just say, you know what, if you're not fit enough, just get out of here. Whoa, Roger!

What we see in Federer is the tension between the necessarily ego-centric world view of a man in his position, tugged at by his decent guy's attempt to be fair and understanding of all points of view. A lot of former champions (Jimmy Connors, anyone?) would just ask, "Why bother?"

I enjoy the contrast between these two players, and the fact that we're hard-pressed to call it a "rivalry" is a shame. I think Roddick, especially in his loose cannon moments - could bring out things that even Nadal can't in Federer. Those things could be dangerous to Roddick and others (we all know about playing with matches, right?), and I think the fact that Nadal, by virtue of his personality, can't tap into them is too bad. It's also one of Nadal's best weapons, but let's leave that for another time.


« Last Edit: January 28, 2009, 04:14:30 PM by pawan89 »


Offline monstertruck

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #323 on: January 28, 2009, 05:08:53 PM »
That's a gem professor!

I can see why Federer rubs some folks the wrong way.
CONK da ball!!!

Offline Dallas

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #324 on: January 28, 2009, 05:22:44 PM »
This was a good reply from CL concerning that piece:

Posted by CL  01/28/2009 @ 4:30 PM 
 
Pete - I'm sure you wish the service for your friend didn't have to end, yet didn't have to be, at least so soon. My condolences.


- Fosbury Flop! Very cool. I remembering seeing the Fosbury roll out the Flop.

About Fed and his code speak. I pretty much agree with what you have written but I think you are missing one element. Language. For all his facility, English is not Fed's first language. (I was almost going to write 'mother tongue'. heh) As much as you can hear him mentally beeping as he tries to back away, I think you can sometimes also hear him mentally down shifting through language gears to the right word in the language he is speaking at the moment. And I've occasionally been amazed by words in English that he doesn't seem to quite 'get.' Only because of his relative fluency of course. It would be very interesting to see if someone who covers his press conferences in German, say, always comes away with the same impression of his thoughts as the person who was in the English...or French version. Subtlety can speak volumes. (Of course then you would be relying on the person who was at the German press conference to tell you, in English of his impression of Fed's words in German. Oy, my head.)

 

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #325 on: January 28, 2009, 05:53:30 PM »
Ladies and gentlemen, we bring you – for one night and one night only – the Roger and Andy Show. It will be the 18th episode of the everyday story of Grand Slam winning folk, a heart-warming tale of two decent blokes who wear shorts to work and terrify their workmates with the wave of a racquet.

As with most soap operas, the plot tends to be a little repetitive and you can easily miss out a couple of seasons, return to the action and pick up where you left off. Oh look, there's the lovely Roger, and he's winning. Ah, there's the lovely Andy, and he's losing.

Poor Roddick has tried everything he can think of to get the better of Federer, and yet he has only managed two wins in 17 previous meetings. Even then, he needed Federer's help to win.

Back in 2003, the Swiss had not evolved into the Mighty Fed and, with only one Wimbledon title to his name, he was still only the Awfully-Good-And-Might-Just-Turn-Into-A-Legend-So-Let's-Just-Wait-And-See Fed. As he faced Roddick in the semifinals of the Montreal Masters, he knew that a victory would give him the world No. 1 ranking. And he choked. Couldn't serve for trembling. Couldn't win for nerves. Admittedly, it was the last time that happened to Federer as he set off on the path to true greatness, but the moment was enough to give Roddick his first win.

That was back in the days of Roddick's pomp. That summer he swept all before him, losing just two matches from the day he walked out of the French Open to the night he lifted the US Open trophy. Unsurprisingly, one of those matches was to Federer in the Wimbledon semifinals, but Roddick was on his way to ending the year as the world No. 1. Alas, by the time that summer was over, the Swiss had become the Mighty Fed - and that was the end of that.

Roddick's only other chance to win came last year when he ambushed a slightly crook Federer in the quarterfinals of the Miami Masters. Suffering from glandular fever at the start of the year, not even Federer realised quite how long the after-effects would linger, and it was not until he got to the US Open in September that he began to feel like his old self. So when Roddick ran into him in March, the American took full advantage of an under-par opponent and did for him in three sets.

You would think that Roddick would be sick of the sight of Federer by now, but he and his Swiss rival seem to have formed a mutual appreciation society. They have known each other for half a lifetime, and much as Roddick may be fed up with losing, he will not have anyone else knocking his mate. So, as the critics and the pundits spent most of last year writing Federer's obituary, Roddick fumed.

"I was really happy to see Roger win the US Open last year," Roddick said. "If I'm being frank with you guys, he was a lot classier in that press conference with everyone here than I would have been if I was in that position.

"He has nothing to prove. He's the greatest. He's created quite an animal for himself, where if someone wins a set they're questioning his form. The guy made two finals, a semi, and won a Slam last year, and people are saying he's off form. I think he deserves a lot more respect than that."

Roddick, too, deserves more respect than his record against Federer suggests. Not only is he slimmer, trimmer and faster than he has ever been, he is also a more mature competitor this year. Where in the past, Roddick might have started to fret when things did not go his way, now he sticks to his game plan, goes back to the basics and tries again.

Against Novak Djokovic in the quarterfinals, his serve and his forehand were the expected weapons, but his backhand was a much improved shot. Not only that, when any stroke went off the boil, he did not panic but, rather, he tried it again and made sure he got it right.

The change in Roddick has not gone unnoticed. Federer has played Roddick in the good times, when the American was at his best, and he has played him when Roddick has been struggling. Now Fed is just pleased to be playing Roddick at all, whatever shape he's in. Then again, with that 15-2 winning record over A-Rod going into the match, it is no wonder he is pleased to see his old mate again.

"I'm excited playing Andy," Federer said. "I'm happy for him. He's doing well here again. He's one of my generation who was able to stay at this level for, what is it five, six years now? Maybe even more, because he came up in 2003 and won then. So he's already been up there for a long time and never really fell out of the top 15. That's rock-solid.

"That's why I'm excited to play against him and seeing him create an upset in a big tournament. That's what's kind of been missing for him in the big tournaments lately."

Judging by the way Federer marmelised Juan Martin Del Potro on Tuesday night, he is feeling confident. Judging by the way Roddick has been underplaying his chances of late, is seems that he is just enjoying the ride. It all bodes well for a belting semifinal. Episode 18 of the Roger and Andy Show, 7.30pm on Thursday. Do not adjust your set …



Offline Dallas

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #326 on: January 28, 2009, 06:07:08 PM »
Who wrote that article?

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #327 on: January 28, 2009, 06:42:38 PM »
IDK, got it from the AO website.



Offline Dallas

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #328 on: February 08, 2009, 06:42:15 PM »
Andy Roddick, beaten by Roger Federer in the Australian Open semifinals, returned to the U.S. in time to attend the Super Bowl: "I went to my first Super Bowl last weekend!!!  It was so much fun! Brooklyn was down there working, so I decided to tag along. I stayed with Mardy, and played some golf….I would have much rather been playing the final in Melbourne, but this was a great way to spend a weekend."

Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #329 on: March 14, 2009, 11:47:40 PM »
March 13, 2009

An interview with:

ANDY RODDICK

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Congratulations on Davis Cup again.
ANDY RODDICK: Thanks.

Q. How long have you been here? You've had just the two matches I guess in the last few weeks. Do you feel rusty at all?
ANDY RODDICK: Oh, no, I feel fine. I've actually played more matches to start this year than I have for a while, and the schedule has actually played out nicely.
You know, playing at Davis Cup time with that kind of atmosphere, you kind of are forced to get going pretty quick. So I definitely don't feel like I'm short on matches.
You know, especially I'm playing doubles tonight, so that should help a little bit. I feel all right.

Q. What made you decide to play doubles?
ANDY RODDICK: Um, you know, it's kind of a thing where you don't you could play Saturday, possibly Sunday, and sorry. To answer your first question, I got out here on, I think it was Monday evening.
I spent I flew home on Sunday evening, came out Monday evening. That's kind of a long time to be practicing. More so than anything it's about me getting antsy and wanting to play. So when a tournament is 10 , 11 day tournament it's not a bad idea.
Mardy wanted to play, so it made sense.

Q. Helpful for volleying?
ANDY RODDICK: I sure hope so.

Q. Your upcoming wedding plans, any coincidence that's during the clay court season?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, it's I mean, it's a little bit poetic. No, I'm joking. No, it's just yeah, that's purely coincidental, I'm sure.

Q. Will you be taking a lot of time off, though, around the wedding?
ANDY RODDICK: No. I have a normal schedule. My schedule hasn't really changed much.

Q. What advice do you have for young tennis players?
ANDY RODDICK: Um, well, the thing that I always say, and it's kind of boring, but the one thing you can control on a daily basis in tennis is how hard you work and what you put into it.
That's probably a little boring, but you can't control your coach's mood or conditions or anything like that, but you can control what you try to do, so...

Q. He's always in a pretty good mood, Larry. But coming to the place where he won a title, I wonder if that picks him up a little.
ANDY RODDICK: You know what, like you said, he's always pretty jovial. I don't know if I've seen him in a bad mood yet. I've been playing well so far this year, so...
I don't know if it's so much that he won here that he actually lived here for 18 years. So I think I hear a lot more stories about, you know, what his sons did here and at this place and that place when they were four and five years old than I have, you know, about his win. You pretty much have to ask him about it for him to talk about it.

Q. Did you have a favorite tennis player growing up, sort of like a role model?
ANDY RODDICK: I had a bunch of them, actually. I was pretty lucky. Like most U.S. tennis fans, I was spoiled by the generation that preceded me, you know, from Pete to Andre to Chang to Courier to the tail end of Conners and McEnroe.
That's been pretty cool, because I've actually gotten to develop pretty good personal relationships with pretty much all of those guys. So it's been fun in that regard.

Q. One of your longest, I think, lasting relationships in the sport is with your trainer, Doug Spreen.
ANDY RODDICK: Uh huh.

Q. What made you decide at a young age to have him travel with you full time? Did you consider it a necessity, or was it just something you wanted to try out, or...
ANDY RODDICK: I think just judging my dad had had some pretty bad back problems, and my brother didn't play. You know, he was pretty good, and I'm pretty sure he would have been top 70, 80, but he had to stop because of back problems.
You know, maybe if they would have started getting after it. You know, when you start treating something after it's a problem you're already behind.
I think that probably stuck in my mind a little bit. You know, at that point there was really no reason not to. I had done well enough to where I could afford it, and I felt like maybe it was an investment in myself. I had also seen, you know, Pete had a guy for a long time and there were a lot of top players who had gone that route, and had encouraged it, also.
So, you know, I figured there wasn't really a downside to it if you did it. You know, if it didn't work out then there really wasn't much loss there.

Q. Is the most important thing he does for you, is it off court workout stuff or is it more recovery?
ANDY RODDICK: Doug's a little bit of a jack of all trades. He was an ATP Tour trainer for a while. I think it was 12 years or something like that. So, you know, a bunch of little things you get, whether it's, you know, blisters on the feet or whatever, he knows how to deal with that stuff. He does stretching, he does massage, he does a whole bunch of stuff.
And from his time with the ATP, he has great relationships with a lot of the tournament doctors and other physios. If there's something that's if there is a chiropractic need or a medical doctor need, he's good at organizing that, too.
So, you know, Doug is dialed in. I don't really have to worry about a whole lot when he's around.

Q. When you play out here, the weather can be so different. You can play in the afternoon and it's 100. Then you play tonight, and the wind picks up it could be 55. How do you prepare for that? Do you say, I'm going to play no matter what and not let the conditions dictate how I play?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, there isn't another option, besides defaulting. I think the biggest thing is you probably do have to look at the weather reports and adjust your string tensions more than anything.
You know, it can be a totally different match depending on what time you play. I think the only thing I'm concerned about is what Tommy Haas is stringing his racquets at that weekend.
Then I just copy that and hope for the best. It's worked for him forever, so maybe it will work for me, too. (laughter.)

Q. Nice improv.
ANDY RODDICK: Thank you.
No, just string tensions I think is the only thing that really concerns me about that.

Q. How do you grade your season so far, and what are the next goals for you in the next couple of months?
ANDY RODDICK: It's been real good so far. You know, even if some of the matches I've lost I feel like I've played pretty well.
You know, a lot of the matches that have been on these kind of stages I've played well, and I have toughed some matches out. I feel like I'm playing better tennis, you know. I'm winning like a quarter of my return games so far this year, which is good for me.
You know, kind of winning points in different ways. You know, I'd like to just kind of continue on this path. I feel like it's going the right way.

Q. Do you have to really consciously work at trying to keep the weight off that you lost, or is it actually easier once you're playing matches?
ANDY RODDICK: Ah, well, I mean, it's something that I think is you know, you can't just I think it's just about creating new habits, which I feel I'm doing a decent job of.
You know, it's probably harder when you're playing matches, because when you're working out you're doing physical activity and playing tennis all in the same day, so you're getting a lot of work.
I think you just have to be diligent about what you eat and, you know, times you're eating and stuff. But I don't really worry about it as much during tournaments, because a lot of times you're going to have to put the carbs and starches into your body, so on and so forth.
I think it's a matter of not getting sloppy on off weeks and making sure you're



Offline BGT

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #330 on: March 16, 2009, 10:40:19 PM »
One picture per post just like Dallas and Chris. :))




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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #331 on: March 16, 2009, 10:40:48 PM »



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #332 on: March 16, 2009, 10:41:12 PM »
« Last Edit: March 16, 2009, 10:42:11 PM by BGT »



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #333 on: March 16, 2009, 10:41:33 PM »



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #334 on: March 16, 2009, 10:42:33 PM »



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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #338 on: March 17, 2009, 09:48:00 AM »
March 15, 2009

A. RODDICK/D. Koellerer

6 1, 7 6

An interview with:

ANDY RODDICK

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. I didn't know much about him, did you?
ANDY RODDICK: I had heard some stuff going into the match, but I hadn't really seen him play at all before.
You know, I was kind of Larry came out and watched about a set and a half of his match the other day, and, you know, I was just going on what I had heard a lot.

Q. What do you think of him?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah, I mean, he certainly tried everything in his power to get a win. Umm, I heard there was going to be, you know, possibly an injury time out or six.
And, you know, I kind of just knew that I was going to have to really stay focused and kind of stay the course and try not to get caught up in the histrionics of it all.

Q. You thought you played well?
ANDY RODDICK: I played okay. Um, it was when you get a night here and it's a little cooler, it's tough to make the ball move at all. So what you saw was a lot more kind of extended rallies.
I'm happy because I feel like I've certainly been doing that a lot better this year. Kind of added that option, so that's a good thing. There's certainly room for improvement, but a win is a win.

Q. What have you been adding to your game in the course of this year with the fitness and Larry? I mean, about three weeks into the year, what do you bring into your game?
ANDY RODDICK: I think it's just different options, you know. You can play different matches different ways. Tonight I was able to stay back. I wasn't really too concerned about getting into long rallies. I didn't mind it. Being able to move the ball around a little bit more. He wants me to maybe trust my instincts a little bit more and kind of get a feel for the match.
No, it's been working so far. You know, I know that I can win some points on my legs now. It helps a lot on return games, you know, kind of digging out that first ball after a return, and I think that showed.

Q. What do you think about Nicolas Kiefer, your next opponent?
ANDY RODDICK: He's certainly accomplished. He's a veteran. There's not going to be anything I'm going to show him that he hasn't seen before, and probably vice versa. I think we've played each other four or five times, you know.
He's certainly he plays aggressively, and he's going he's going to certainly he's tough. He's not going to be intimidated by a situation. He's played on big courts before and big matches. It's going to be tough.

Q. If you were in charge of marketing for the game of tennis, how would you make it more popular than it already is?
ANDY RODDICK: Well, I mean, you're going to have to I'm going to preface this by saying if you look at numbers, whether it's TV ratings or racquet sales, even in this economy, whether it's USTA memberships, you know, so on and so forth, tennis is doing pretty well.
We're not taking $175 million loans, this, that, and the other. So that being said, you know, I think they're doing an okay job. I'm always a fan of the US Open because on top of the tennis, I think you draw fans because it's an event.
You know, they have kick off concerts and there's stuff going on around the grounds. There's constantly music being played around the grounds. It's free entertainment for kids. There's places you can play. There's merchandise.
There's a whole punch of stuff going on that makes it fun, even if, let's say, you're not a hard core tennis fan. I think it certainly wouldn't hurt if that was, you know, a weekly thing. I think they do a pretty good job with it here with the tennis garden and the whole thing in the back. You can kind of come and hang out. I think the more of that the better.

Q. Tonight, as you mentioned, he's got quite a reputation, but what do you think of his game, and how do you think he'd do without all that extra stuff?
ANDY RODDICK: I don't know. I mean, he certainly, you know, tries hard. He never quit, you know. I'm not really sure that, you know, all that other stuff is super necessary. You know, probably lose you as many matches it was wins.
It's either going to pump the guy up to play better or you get under his skin a little bit. You know, I don't know if it's necessary. I don't know.

Q. You're one of the rare players who mentioned the economy, the bad economy. Is it difficult now to raise the money for your charity, funds? As I said, the economy is bad. You're nice to mention that. Other players don't.
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah.

Q. Is it difficult to raise the money for your charity? Do you feel that?
ANDY RODDICK: Yeah. I mean, I think it's noticeable. You know, more than anything, I think you just have to get more creative. I mean, I don't think people's spirits have changed in how much they want to give. It just may affect how much they can.
You know, we looked at different avenues, like we did a, you know, kind of an all night food drive in New York where it's through Facebook and you have 25,000 fans and you're trying to get each of them to donate a dollar.
You just kind of have to we're trying new and exciting ways to, clever ways, to raise money and raise funds. I mean, people are less likely to write blank checks. We're certainly conscious of that.
I mean, we try to give, you know, some free stuff, also. Obviously, at our events in Florida we have free kids day, you know, where you can come and get entertainment and there's moon walks and free tennis clinics and the whole deal.
So it is tough, but, you know, that just means you have to kind of come up with new ways.

Q. After the first set, which you won fairly comfortably and against an opponent who was barely breaking 100 miles an hour on his serve, were you surprised only to get one break in the second set?
ANDY RODDICK: One break would have been fine as long as I hadn't lost my own serve. I was surprised to lose serve. I don't think I should have lost that game. I'm a little upset with I remember hitting three pretty ordinary shots in that game.
You know, if you think about it, if I hold there, there's only one more opportunity for me to break and we're not having this discussion. So I'm probably more concerned with getting broken in the second set.

Q. Regarding the Dubai visa thing, do you think the response of the tennis world was appropriate, and what do you think it accomplished?
ANDY RODDICK: I think you're going to have to be more specific with your question. You know, I don't know if I am really aware what the response was. I mean...

Q. I'm asking it for a buddy. That's fine.
ANDY RODDICK: Okay. Sorry.

Q. As far as that event goes, what are your feelings about playing it next year?
ANDY RODDICK: It's not the thing that I didn't want to get lost in translation with that whole thing it's just an equal rights thing. I don't think you should mix sports and politics too much. It has nothing to do with Dubai as a country. I thought I was I definitely tried to go out of my way in saying when I was there I enjoyed my time. Everybody treated me great. I think it's a fantastic event.
It's just unfortunate that, you know, that circumstance took place. I don't feel there's a place for that in our sport. If anything, I mean, she's I don't really know Shahar that well, but from what I've heard, she would be an asset to everything going on there. She's pretty articulate. From all accounts, she's a nice girl.
It had nothing to do with anything political going on between the countries. I feel like just every person, if they're you know, it goes back to if you're good enough you should be allowed to play and not, you know, subjected to your nationality or race or gender or anything like that.
I just feel like it should be an open field in our sport.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports....



Offline yellowball

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Re: QUOTES ON, ABOUT, AND FROM ANDY RODDICK
« Reply #339 on: March 17, 2009, 12:34:10 PM »
I read that Andy was throwing around some M**F** words around during the match, directed at Koelleer.   :\