Author Topic: How about stringing machines?  (Read 1758 times)

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Offline ImaMadGoat

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How about stringing machines?
« on: March 13, 2005, 08:18:34 PM »
This is something I haven't seen brought up on our forums. I would really like to start stringing my own racquets. I have plenty of extra racquets to practice on, but I'm not sure what is the best valued stringer out there. I don't break often....but the I don't trust my coach or the local guy to string my racquet. I usually send it out to a certified stringer. I would eventually like to get certified as I want to have my own shop one day.

So whatdya think guys and gals?
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Offline MC ill Logic

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Re: How about stringing machines?
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2005, 08:45:48 PM »
THIS is the one I have, and it's great.  When I'm doing my own rackets, and I'm not really giving a crap, I can do a racket in 20 minutes.  I'm not sure how accurate the tension is but for the most part I'm satisfied.  During college away matches, I'd take it with me on the plane and my teammates thought my jobs felt "better" than those of the guy who usually did it.  

If you want to get certified, you may want to buy a more expensive machine, though.  I'm assuming you want to make money by stringing, otherwise I don't see the point in getting certified.  The machine I have now, I'm not so sure it was designed to handle stringing 15 rackets a day.

Offline Tennis4you

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How about stringing machines?
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2005, 09:37:54 PM »
Probably not meant for massive stringing.  I have the Klippermate, it is similar and similar in price too.  And I could care less when I do my own racquets.  I do not notice any difference when I go from one racquet to another in my bag.  I do wonder how accurate it is though.  Feels fine to me and I have heard no complaints when I string for others.
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Offline maranatha tennis

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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2005, 09:07:04 AM »
I love the Klipper also but have used most all of the other kinds, stand up constant pull, electronic and pneumatic. And the Klip does a good job if you are good, but the others make it easier for you to work and the industry standard is the great , and expensive, electronic. Heck even the kid at the Sports Authority uses a Babolat Star! The industry standard is still the crank type stand up model with 4 mounting points and you will be tested on such a machine to get certified. Now the only reason to get certified is to get hired. I know pros who will not even hire someone unless they are certified. so....

The real reason to string is for yourself. Or at least work for yourself. I string for my clients and friends and that is it. Sometimes alot, sometimes nothing.

PS

I am sorry I can't be here more often Scotty.

Offline Jamesdster

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How about stringing machines?
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2005, 09:08:46 AM »
I also have a Klippermate and love it.  Very inexpensive and does a good job.
I was at this casino minding my own business, and this guy came up to me and said, "You're gonna have to move, you're blocking a fire exit." As though if there was a fire, I wasn't gonna run. If you're flammible and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit.  - Mitch Hedberg

Offline maranatha tennis

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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2005, 09:19:02 AM »
I meant the standard for the USRSA is the stand up crank model.

But I have both at home but for the most part I choose to use the Klipper and I string gut with it for me! I don't know that my customers know the diff, I keep the Klip at home in my bedroom!

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Offline Arcforce

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How about stringing machines?
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2005, 05:43:12 PM »
How did you guys learn to string? I wanna get me a stringer too but I was always worried that I'd end up cracking expensive racquets instead of saving money by doing the job myself. Have you guys ever cracked a racquet?

Offline Tennis4you

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Re: re
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2005, 05:49:25 PM »
Quote from: "maranatha tennis"
I am sorry I can't be here more often Scotty.


No biggie yo.  Stop by when u have time, your posts are apprecited.
Good Luck on the Court!!!
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Offline maranatha tennis

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« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2005, 07:55:18 PM »
I would want to practice on a couple of frames from a thrift store yo. I learned by watching and then practicing on the same machine later.

Offline MC ill Logic

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How about stringing machines?
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2005, 09:34:49 PM »
I started stringing on my real rackets.  Unless you do something insanely inappropriate, breaking the racket just isn't going to happen.  

But whoever wants to string their own rackets, go for it.  I've saved so much money and it's very very easy.  After you do it once or twice you'll say to yourself "hmmm, that's exactly the way it should work."  You'll occasionally run into something that stumps you for a second...

(like if you run into a shared hole and you can't seem to get the second string to go through... or you forget what the pattern was after you cut the strings off... or you mount it off center... or you weave it incorrectly, instead of over and under you go over and over...or if you're using string from a reel, you miscalculate how much string you'll need, and get to the end only to realize you don't have enough string to tie the knot)

... but seriously it's really no more complicated than changing a tire.  For a serious player who plans on playing for the rest of his life, buying a $135 stringer is a no brainer.  You can string rackets for your friends for $10 a pop (plus cost of string) and it'll pay for itself in no time, and their hella durable.