Author Topic: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"  (Read 3960 times)

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Offline Swish

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Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« on: December 23, 2007, 10:46:57 PM »
By Peter Griffiths
Fri Dec 21, 10:19 AM ET
 


LONDON (Reuters) - Reading in dim light won't damage your eyes, you don't need eight glasses of water a day to stay healthy and shaving your legs won't make the hair grow back faster.
 
These well-worn theories are among seven "medical myths" exposed in a paper published Friday in the British Medical Journal, which traditionally carries light-hearted features in its Christmas edition. Two U.S. researchers took seven common beliefs and searched the archives for evidence to support them.

Despite frequent mentions in the popular press of the need to drink eight glasses of water, they found no scientific basis for the claim.

The complete lack of evidence has been recorded in a study published the American Journal of Psychology, they said.

The other six "myths" are:

* Reading in dim light ruins your eyesight

The majority of eye experts believe it is unlikely to do any permanent damage, but it may make you squint, blink more and have trouble focusing, the researchers said.

* Shaving makes hair grow back faster or coarser

It has no effect on the thickness or rate of hair regrowth, studies say. But stubble lacks the finer taper of unshaven hair, giving the impression of coarseness.

* Eating turkey makes you drowsy

It does contain an amino acid called tryptophan that is involved in sleep and mood control. But turkey has no more of the acid than chicken or minced beef. Eating lots of food and drink at Christmas are probably the real cause of sleepiness.

* We use only 10 percent of our brains

This myth arose as early as 1907 but imaging shows no area of the brain is silent or completely inactive.

* Hair and fingernails continue to grow after death

This idea may stem from ghoulish novels. The researchers said the skin dries out and retracts after death, giving the appearance of longer hair or nails.

* Mobile phones are dangerous in hospitals

Despite widespread concerns, studies have found minimal interference with medical equipment.

The research was conducted by Aaron Carroll, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, and Rachel Vreeman, fellow in children's health services research at Indiana University School of Medicine.


Offline Victor

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2008, 01:50:58 PM »
Interesting about the water, but I can only add that it is good for you :)
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2008, 04:45:01 PM »
Pretty funny. Now are all going to be the a-hole who goes around correcting everyone?

 :rofl_2:
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Offline yellowball

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2008, 06:20:10 PM »
Listening to the radio, driving today, I heard that "Antioxidants actually can increase your risk of cancer."

We need to just ignore most of the things these "studies" come out with. It always seems a couple of years down the line they do a study that comes out exactly opposite of what they said first. Never know what to believe.

Offline Swish

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2008, 06:33:00 PM »
Listening to the radio, driving today, I heard that "Antioxidants actually can increase your risk of cancer."

We need to just ignore most of the things these "studies" come out with. It always seems a couple of years down the line they do a study that comes out exactly opposite of what they said first. Never know what to believe.

That's the radio, they may be backed by parmaceutical companies that don't want people to take vitamins. It hurts their profits.

The studies are good but some are poorly designed and that invalidates the results.

Vitamins are good, besides were going to die anyway.  :)

Offline pawan89

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2008, 12:11:53 PM »
* Shaving makes hair grow back faster or coarser

It has no effect on the thickness or rate of hair regrowth, studies say. But stubble lacks the finer taper of unshaven hair, giving the impression of coarseness.

What about if you shave your beard before it grows all out the first time, it grows back in patches? I think I heard James Blake talking about Fish's beard doing this, it grows back in patches or something, I didn't believe it at all untill that point. The reason I just mentioned and the one you talked about is the reason my dad insists on me not shaving my beard or moustache until it grows all out the first time  :rofl_2: its annoying especially since its taking so long but I really don't care how I look so I could care less. its still annoying.


Offline Swish

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 12:23:39 PM »
* Shaving makes hair grow back faster or coarser

It has no effect on the thickness or rate of hair regrowth, studies say. But stubble lacks the finer taper of unshaven hair, giving the impression of coarseness.

What about if you shave your beard before it grows all out the first time, it grows back in patches? I think I heard James Blake talking about Fish's beard doing this, it grows back in patches or something, I didn't believe it at all untill that point. The reason I just mentioned and the one you talked about is the reason my dad insists on me not shaving my beard or moustache until it grows all out the first time  :rofl_2: its annoying especially since its taking so long but I really don't care how I look so I could care less. its still annoying.

Shave all you want!  :)
The process that makes hair grow doesn't know if the hair produced has been cut.


Offline pawan89

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2008, 03:36:07 PM »
* Shaving makes hair grow back faster or coarser

It has no effect on the thickness or rate of hair regrowth, studies say. But stubble lacks the finer taper of unshaven hair, giving the impression of coarseness.

What about if you shave your beard before it grows all out the first time, it grows back in patches? I think I heard James Blake talking about Fish's beard doing this, it grows back in patches or something, I didn't believe it at all untill that point. The reason I just mentioned and the one you talked about is the reason my dad insists on me not shaving my beard or moustache until it grows all out the first time  :rofl_2: its annoying especially since its taking so long but I really don't care how I look so I could care less. its still annoying.

Shave all you want!  :)
The process that makes hair grow doesn't know if the hair produced has been cut.


that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.


Offline Swish

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2008, 09:26:21 PM »
* Shaving makes hair grow back faster or coarser

It has no effect on the thickness or rate of hair regrowth, studies say. But stubble lacks the finer taper of unshaven hair, giving the impression of coarseness.

What about if you shave your beard before it grows all out the first time, it grows back in patches? I think I heard James Blake talking about Fish's beard doing this, it grows back in patches or something, I didn't believe it at all untill that point. The reason I just mentioned and the one you talked about is the reason my dad insists on me not shaving my beard or moustache until it grows all out the first time  :rofl_2: its annoying especially since its taking so long but I really don't care how I look so I could care less. its still annoying.

Shave all you want!  :)
The process that makes hair grow doesn't know if the hair produced has been cut.


that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.

Shave holloween morning, then no one will know who you are for halloween.  :gleam:

Offline DrJ105

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2008, 04:46:02 PM »
Actually hair follicles do have sensory innervation.  You can prove that by lightly touching the hair on your arm while not pressing hard enough to touch the skin.  I don't know if this enables the hair root to know how long hairs are.  I would think not.

[/quote]
that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.
[/quote]

Offline dmastous

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2008, 04:57:04 PM »
Quote


that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.
Actually hair follicles do have sensory innervation.  You can prove that by lightly touching the hair on your arm while not pressing hard enough to touch the skin.  I don't know if this enables the hair root to know how long hairs are.  I would think not.

I had always assumed that was more the nerves in the skin feeling the pressure from touching the imbedded hair.

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Offline DrJ105

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2008, 06:37:17 PM »
That might be as well.  I thought there were nerve endings actually attached to the root, but I could be wrong.  Let me pull out my histology books and see if they say anything  :).  I guess it's a moot point since any information it receives doesn't affect hair growth anyway.


Quote


that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.
Actually hair follicles do have sensory innervation.  You can prove that by lightly touching the hair on your arm while not pressing hard enough to touch the skin.  I don't know if this enables the hair root to know how long hairs are.  I would think not.

I had always assumed that was more the nerves in the skin feeling the pressure from touching the imbedded hair.

Offline DrJ105

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2008, 09:18:50 PM »
Found it:

"Networks of free dermal nerve endings surround most hair follicles and attach to their outer root sheath.  In this position they are particularly sensitive to hair movement and serve as mechanoreceptors."
Quote


that's what I thoght. how does the body know if the hair is cut or not externally. its like nails, or even hair on the head, the body as far as I know doesn't have  a way of knowing how long it is externally. The only thing I can think of is skin, but I don't see how that'd be any different now or later. oh well, I'll just wait.. maybe like halloween a year from now i'll have a full grown beard and mustache and then the next day i'll shave and no one can recognize me.
Actually hair follicles do have sensory innervation.  You can prove that by lightly touching the hair on your arm while not pressing hard enough to touch the skin.  I don't know if this enables the hair root to know how long hairs are.  I would think not.

I had always assumed that was more the nerves in the skin feeling the pressure from touching the imbedded hair.

Offline dmastous

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2008, 09:32:51 PM »
Found it:

"Networks of free dermal nerve endings surround most hair follicles and attach to their outer root sheath.  In this position they are particularly sensitive to hair movement and serve as mechanoreceptors."

That makes perfect sense.......

Umm......



What?  :confused1:

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Offline DrJ105

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2008, 09:35:20 PM »
hehe, that's what I thought when I first read articles about the physics of hitting a tennis ball!

It means that there are nerves attached to the part of your hairs that is below the skin, and this allows the body to sense when the hairs are being moved! How cool is that!!!!!

Found it:

"Networks of free dermal nerve endings surround most hair follicles and attach to their outer root sheath.  In this position they are particularly sensitive to hair movement and serve as mechanoreceptors."

That makes perfect sense.......

Umm......



What?  :confused1:

Offline OSU Buckeye

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2008, 02:14:16 PM »
Very Cool!   It is about time we get some real knowledge up in here!   Thanks Doc! 

Offline Dallas

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2008, 10:25:50 PM »
Very Cool!  It is about time we get some real knowledge up in here!    Thanks Doc! 

Hey!  I resemble that remark! :head-bash:

But yes, it's good to actually learn something other than tennis around here! :))

Offline dmastous

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2008, 11:10:34 PM »
Very Cool!  It is about time we get some real knowledge up in here!    Thanks Doc! 

Hey!  I resemble that remark! :head-bash:

But yes, it's good to actually learn something other than tennis around here! :))

What ever happened to CGW?

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

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Offline OSU Buckeye

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2008, 10:37:59 AM »
Very Cool!  It is about time we get some real knowledge up in here!    Thanks Doc! 

Hey!  I resemble that remark! :head-bash:

But yes, it's good to actually learn something other than tennis around here! :))

What ever happened to CGW?

I often wonder the same thing.     But, what brought that up? 

Offline dmastous

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Re: Revealed: The seven great "medical myths"
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2008, 03:21:26 PM »
Very Cool!  It is about time we get some real knowledge up in here!    Thanks Doc! 

Hey!  I resemble that remark! :head-bash:

But yes, it's good to actually learn something other than tennis around here! :))

What ever happened to CGW?

I often wonder the same thing.     But, what brought that up? 

Wasn't she in the medical profession?

Is a tree as a rocking horse
An ambition fulfilled
And is the sawdust jealous?
I worry about these things .

Kevin Godley & Lol Crème (I Pity Inanimate Objects)