Author Topic: Beginner racquet upgrade  (Read 2013 times)

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Offline akc102

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Beginner racquet upgrade
« on: March 15, 2008, 07:58:37 AM »
I am a beginning tennis player, using a Wilson Prostaff 6.6 OS that an X bought for me some years back.  I'd like to upgrade a little as my interest is great and I know I will continue to play.  The strings on my "stick" are strung so tight I am sure to take out an eye if one ever broke!!  I dont have several hundred + to spend, so I am looking for something used, a demo, on sale, or below the $100 mark.  As a beginner, I am not (yet) overly concerned about head heavy, head light...I am still too new.  Playing sports all my life, I have a good arm and feel that I can produce a decent amount of power for my skill level.  I'd think a racquet that was balanced and perhaps something on the slightly heavier side would work.  Although as a beginner, I COULD BE TOTALLY WRONG!!  From what I have written, any suggestions?  Thought I'd start demo-ing some thru my local pro shop as well as TW, but dont really know where to start.
Thanks!!

Offline Victor

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2008, 08:34:37 AM »
Tell us about your preffered playstyle... serve and volley, volley alot, spin-user, flat hitter?
I might get an estimate then!

And most of all, randomly pick out rackets and test them, and your partners ones to so you can see which you like!
« Last Edit: March 15, 2008, 08:35:34 AM by Victor »
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Offline Victor

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2008, 08:43:03 AM »
Some first hand tips

-Babolat, prince tend to be good starters, wilsons and heads are more of a raw diamond and harder to handle.
-You can take old line series for a good price, say Head Flexpoint (130) or liquidmetal (100) instead of the new microgel (180)

And most of all testestesttest
Dont fight about tennis, support tennis.

I just didn't think I would be seeing a clay court tournament where Roddick is still in it and Nadal is out.   -   Dallas -  31 May, RG 2009

Offline akc102

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2008, 09:08:24 AM »
Thanks for the reply V-
As a beginner I cant say I have a "preferred playstyle" yet.  My strength is playing from the baseline as opposed to the net.  I practice my topspin frequently and have a good handle on the mechanics of it.  I serve pretty well for my skill level, although that's something I practice, practice, practice.  I have no fear of an aggressive volley, or attacking with my backhand.  Would an "all court" racquet suffice for now?

Offline dmastous

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2008, 09:34:57 AM »
First of all, as a beginner, going out a buy a new racquet would a bit of a waste of $$$$.
There is nothing wrong with the Wilson Prostaff 6.6 that a few lessons, and some new string wouldn't cure. That would be my recommendation. New (less tight) string would cost around $30.
Then as you develop a playing style, or an awareness of what you dislike about the Pro Staff, you can more intelligently look for a new frame.
The most important question to answer in changing racquets is "why?". What do you not get in your currrent frame that causes you to go fishing? Does it lack power, or have too much? Is it too heavy, or too light? Sometimes these issues can be solved with new, or better string, or a different tension. Like the power. Then you need to begin to educate yourself with regard to head light/head heavy to understand what these concepts will give you. Do you want heavy frame (around 11.5-12 lbs) or a light one (around 10-11 lbs). There are trade offs. Heavy frames will be sluggish, but give you free power. Once you get them going it doesn't take much effort to make the ball go. Lighter racquets will need more swing, and more racquet head speed, but will be very maneuverable and feel a bit better. Typically light racquets will be head heavy, and heavy racquets head light, but not always. There is a term called swingweight which is essentially the mass of the racquet in motion. But it's all meaningless if you don't know what you want/don't want in a frame, and you won't know that until you've hacked around a bit.
As for where would you start when you do start looking for a new frame, you've nailed it. TW demo program, or a similar demo program at your local tennis shop. Usually they will charge you like $10-$15 to take out 2 or 3 frames at a time to make a comparison.

Is a tree as a rocking horse
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Offline CTDeuce

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2008, 03:01:15 AM »
Im certainly not suggesting you purchase what I use because it does take a good amount of mechanics do use the racquet precisely.  With that being said I use the HEAD MicroGEL Extreme Pro which is normally around $170.  I got 3 of them used each for $80 or less...and all in amazing shape.

Basically just trying to show you that no matter what you choose to use, it won't be hard to find that racquet used for a decent price.  Good luck in deciding. 
Millenium Sport Technologies Representative
www.millenniumsport.net
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x2 Head Liquidmetal Radical @ 60lbs w/ Luxillon ALU power rough
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Beginner racquet upgrade
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2008, 12:00:48 PM »
I think DMast has got it right.  Save your $$$$, put in some new strings and take a few lessons with the dough you saved.  That will do more for your game than a new stick.

Hot Tip-  when hitting with friends ask to try their racquets out so you can begin to feel the differences.  Then in a year or so if you're still playing and hot for a new stick, you'll have demoed dozens of racquets for free!!!

Good luck and keep swinging!
CONK da ball!!!