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Offline Emma

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #260 on: September 09, 2009, 01:55:24 PM »
I quite agree with you. Hi btw and welcome. Sex sells and it's huge these days but movies sold back on those days too, but since the 70s, things have changed and quite significantly so. Romance is all lost. Even in real life, sex comes first, people tend to establish the relationship last. Who to blame, really? Or what to blame. The recent comedies are so cheesy and lack romance and full of clichés. I wonder if the trend will ever change and if it's going to get only worse. The trend certainly points that way. Apparently men's number one priority is sex while women's, sleep.
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #261 on: September 17, 2009, 09:48:24 AM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:
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Offline wilsonboy

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #262 on: September 17, 2009, 01:36:41 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

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Online Babblelot

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #263 on: September 17, 2009, 02:01:33 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

You're one to talk?

I will kill you...
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #264 on: September 17, 2009, 02:03:46 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:
Knock it off Serena! :)>>>>

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I will kill you...
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Offline wilsonboy

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #265 on: September 17, 2009, 02:17:46 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

You're one to talk?

I will kill you...
Knock it off Serena! :)>>>>

You don't love me anymore Babs?  :))
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Offline monstertruck

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #266 on: September 17, 2009, 02:18:49 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

You're one to talk?

I will kill you...
Knock it off Serena! :)>>>>

You don't love me anymore Babs?  :))

Babs loves everybody. ;-()
CONK da ball!!!

Online Babblelot

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #267 on: September 17, 2009, 04:14:43 PM »
Romance is acceptable if done tastefully. I just don't wish to see annihilation cheesy. The abstraction of affair is absolutely absent on western ability these days. But if you watch abounding of the old movies, you will see how accurately they were done. It's accurate that 50 to 60 percent of my favourite movies are from the 30s, 40s, 50s and the 60s. Even the 70s and the 80s had some absolutely abundant movies. It's sad that affair has now become all about sex and what not.


What a random post  :rofl_2: :rofl_2:

You're one to talk?

I will kill you...
Knock it off Serena! :)>>>>

You don't love me anymore Babs?  :))


 :)) :)) :)) :)~ :)) :)) :)) :)) :))
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Offline Soderking

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #268 on: September 24, 2009, 03:44:19 PM »
Ok, I was an "art film" minor in college, so get ready for some really snooty picks!  ::)))

My favorite films (the year of the film may not be 100% right, it is what I can remember):

-Eraserhead (1978) by David Lynch (Yea, I tripped in college, so what?)
-Aguire the Wrath of God (1972) by Warner Herzog
-2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) by Kubrick (like I said, you've got to see it while tripping  :spot on: )
-Chinatown (1974) by Roman Polanski
-The Seventh Seal (1957) by Ingmar Bergman
-Manhatten (1979) by Woody Allen
-Momento (2001) by Christopher Nolan
-Short Films by Maya Deran (1940's) (including "Meshes of the Afternoon")
-Vertigo (1964) by Alfred Hitchcock
-Videodrome (1982) by David Cronenberg (also love "Shivers". "Rabid", "The Brood", "eXistenz", etc.)
-El Topo (1970) by Alejandro Jodorowsky
-The Manchurian Candidate (1962) by John Frankenheimer (see the original)
-Reservoir Dogs (1992) by Quentin Tarentino
-Solaris by Andrei Tarkovsky (1972) (Also love "The Stalker" and "Andrei Rublev")
-Apocalypse Now (1979) by Francis Ford Coppola
-L.A. Confidential (1997) by Curtis Hanson
-The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976) by Nicolas Roeg
-Mean Streets (1970) by Martin Scorscese (obviously, "Good Fellas", "Taxi Driver", "Raging Bull", "The King of Comedy", etc.)
-Blade Runner (1982) by Ridley Scott
-The Age of Gold (1930) by Luis Bunuel
-The Conversation (1974) by Francis Ford Coppola
-Dawn of the Dead (1979) by George Romero
-Blue Velvet (1988)  by David Lynch (Ok, I love Muholland Drive, Lost Highway, Inland Empire too...and Twin Peaks is my favorite tv series along with Patrick Mcgoohan's "The Prisoner")
-The Godfather, Part 2 by Francis Ford Coppola
-Wings of Desire (1987) by Wim Wenders (also love "Paris, Texas")
-Being John Malcovic (1999) by Spike Jonze


Cult Faves little known:

-The Shooting (1967) by Monte Hellman and starring Jack Nicholson (movie mesmerizes me)
-Walkabout (1971) by Nicolas Roeg
-Dead Man (1996) by Jim Jurmansh
-What the Bleep Do We Know?! (2004)
-The Killing (1956) by Stanley Kubrick (great, great movie! Also love Dr. Strangelove, Barry Lyndon, Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket and loved his swansong "Eyes Wide Shut". He is greatness!
-The Hunger (1983) by Tony Scott with David Bowie, Susan Sarandon and Catherine Deneuve (Goth epic)

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Offline Lugburz

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #269 on: September 24, 2009, 03:56:39 PM »
Nice to see there one of the Jim Jarmusch films  ;-()  btw, I enjoyed every movie made by him  :cool:
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Offline Soderking

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #270 on: September 24, 2009, 04:03:01 PM »
Nice to see there one of the Jim Jarmusch films  ;-()  btw, I enjoyed every movie made by him  :cool:


I do too. He is so fantastically "understated" in all his works. I also love "Stranger than Paradise" and "Night on Earth". The movie "Dead Man" had a profound effect on my interests in meditation and death when I saw it. It is a film I've watched multiple times. It really surprised me....one of those films where half way through you're thinking "this is a masterpiece" kind of like "Memento".
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Online Babblelot

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #271 on: September 24, 2009, 04:11:37 PM »
Quite a list, Soderking. Have to admit, I've seen few. I know people have their favorite and tend to hate another, but I enjoyed all three Godfathers. Memento is on my expanded list of favs.
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Offline Emma

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #272 on: September 24, 2009, 09:24:49 PM »
Soderking, great selection of movies. I have seen most of them I must admit and they are on my all time favourite list as well. I am glad you liked both Solaris and The Stalker - both excellent movies. Have you seen the Hollywood version of Solaris though? It wasn't as good as the Russian one but still, not too bad.
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Offline Soderking

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #273 on: September 24, 2009, 10:08:49 PM »
Soderking, great selection of movies. I have seen most of them I must admit and they are on my all time favourite list as well. I am glad you liked both Solaris and The Stalker - both excellent movies. Have you seen the Hollywood version of Solaris though? It wasn't as good as the Russian one but still, not too bad.

Hi Emma,

Thanks so much! There are so many more that hit me after I posted. The films "Picnic at Hanging Rock", "Last Year at Marienbad" and "Altered States" are also in my top 20 for certain. I also love His Girl Friday, All About Eve, The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman with Elliott Gould as Phillip Marlowe), The Maltese Falcon, Petulia, and Kiss Me Deadly (1954).

I love the Tarkovsky Russian version of "Solaris" and saw it a good decade before the remake came out. It blew me away that Director's under the former Soviet Union we're given so much artistic freedom, as I had grown up thinking this was not possibly the case. So seeing that film and Tarkovsky's other works was a real eye opener to me. The remake really had no chance to capture the inspiration of the original, because Tarkovsky uses time and non-linear flows of event to leave the viewer disoriented and yet absorbed in the mystery, and his pace is too slow for Hollywood. But the way he lets one reach their own intepretation and meaning using archetypes in much the same way Kubrick masterfully does is an artistic quality of genius that can't be duplicated. I felt the same way about "The Stalker". His use of images and symbols for subconscious feelings and resonance is masterful.
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Offline Emma

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #274 on: September 26, 2009, 01:30:42 PM »
Soderking, great selection of movies. I have seen most of them I must admit and they are on my all time favourite list as well. I am glad you liked both Solaris and The Stalker - both excellent movies. Have you seen the Hollywood version of Solaris though? It wasn't as good as the Russian one but still, not too bad.

Hi Emma,

Thanks so much! There are so many more that hit me after I posted. The films "Picnic at Hanging Rock", "Last Year at Marienbad" and "Altered States" are also in my top 20 for certain. I also love His Girl Friday, All About Eve, The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman with Elliott Gould as Phillip Marlowe), The Maltese Falcon, Petulia, and Kiss Me Deadly (1954).

I love the Tarkovsky Russian version of "Solaris" and saw it a good decade before the remake came out. It blew me away that Director's under the former Soviet Union we're given so much artistic freedom, as I had grown up thinking this was not possibly the case. So seeing that film and Tarkovsky's other works was a real eye opener to me. The remake really had no chance to capture the inspiration of the original, because Tarkovsky uses time and non-linear flows of event to leave the viewer disoriented and yet absorbed in the mystery, and his pace is too slow for Hollywood. But the way he lets one reach their own intepretation and meaning using archetypes in much the same way Kubrick masterfully does is an artistic quality of genius that can't be duplicated. I felt the same way about "The Stalker". His use of images and symbols for subconscious feelings and resonance is masterful.

Hi King,

I have also seen His Girl Friday, All About Eve, The Maltese Falcon, and Kiss Me Deadly. Have you seen Sunset Blvd? It's quite good. I also liked The Quiet American quite a bit but that's more recent. I have a lot of films from the past that I but unlike you, I can't remember all the names. I did see most of Hitchcock's films.

What happened with Solaris though, I went to Blockbuster just last year to look for a really good Sci-fi movie and Solaris was right there; albeit the American version. I saw it and loved it without knowing the origin of the film even though I thought George Clooney was quite the miscast. You could see why I would love a movie like that regardless because the concept was so original. Anyway, after watching the movie I did a bit of digging and that's when I came to know about the original Solaris. I watched it immediately and noticed all the differences. And then through Solaris, I came to know about the Stalker. Both movies are so unique and like you, I was completely blown away. I found them both to be quite haunting and fascinating. Tarkovsky became one of my favourite directors since then.

I did see a movie the other night, Savage Grace and thought the subject matter was too bold for me. It was based on a true story though but very disturbling nonetheless.
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Offline wilsonboy

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #275 on: September 26, 2009, 02:09:09 PM »
I want to see Jennifer's Body. That looks fun. :)
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Offline Soderking

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #276 on: September 26, 2009, 02:28:34 PM »
Soderking, great selection of movies. I have seen most of them I must admit and they are on my all time favourite list as well. I am glad you liked both Solaris and The Stalker - both excellent movies. Have you seen the Hollywood version of Solaris though? It wasn't as good as the Russian one but still, not too bad.


Hi Emma,

Thanks so much! There are so many more that hit me after I posted. The films "Picnic at Hanging Rock", "Last Year at Marienbad" and "Altered States" are also in my top 20 for certain. I also love His Girl Friday, All About Eve, The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman with Elliott Gould as Phillip Marlowe), The Maltese Falcon, Petulia, and Kiss Me Deadly (1954).

I love the Tarkovsky Russian version of "Solaris" and saw it a good decade before the remake came out. It blew me away that Director's under the former Soviet Union we're given so much artistic freedom, as I had grown up thinking this was not possibly the case. So seeing that film and Tarkovsky's other works was a real eye opener to me. The remake really had no chance to capture the inspiration of the original, because Tarkovsky uses time and non-linear flows of event to leave the viewer disoriented and yet absorbed in the mystery, and his pace is too slow for Hollywood. But the way he lets one reach their own intepretation and meaning using archetypes in much the same way Kubrick masterfully does is an artistic quality of genius that can't be duplicated. I felt the same way about "The Stalker". His use of images and symbols for subconscious feelings and resonance is masterful.


Hi King,

I have also seen His Girl Friday, All About Eve, The Maltese Falcon, and Kiss Me Deadly. Have you seen Sunset Blvd? It's quite good. I also liked The Quiet American quite a bit but that's more recent. I have a lot of films from the past that I but unlike you, I can't remember all the names. I did see most of Hitchcock's films.

What happened with Solaris though, I went to Blockbuster just last year to look for a really good Sci-fi movie and Solaris was right there; albeit the American version. I saw it and loved it without knowing the origin of the film even though I thought George Clooney was quite the miscast. You could see why I would love a movie like that regardless because the concept was so original. Anyway, after watching the movie I did a bit of digging and that's when I came to know about the original Solaris. I watched it immediately and noticed all the differences. And then through Solaris, I came to know about the Stalker. Both movies are so unique and like you, I was completely blown away. I found them both to be quite haunting and fascinating. Tarkovsky became one of my favourite directors since then.

I did see a movie the other night, Savage Grace and thought the subject matter was too bold for me. It was based on a true story though but very disturbling nonetheless.


Yes, I love "Sunset Boulevard" too, and it's been an extremely long time since I saw it. I have not seen the "Quiet American" and just read about it for the first time just now. I love Graham Greene novels, especially "The Power and the Glory" with the "Whiskey Priest" and the Thomas Hardy like play on morals of current society, individualtiy and the oppression of spirit by authority and traditional judgements. One of my favorite bands, Prefab Sprout, wrote one of my favorite songs, "Don't Sing", in tribute to the "Power and the Glory"



"An outlaw stands in a peasant land, in every face see Judas.
The burden of love is so strange.
The stubborn beast and the whiskey priest, are hiding from the captains.
The burden of love is so plain.
Are they happy to see you?
No, you always bring trouble.
Cast a shadow on Mexico-denial doesn't change facts.
Like most I'll come when I want things done,
please God don't let that change.
The anguish of love at long range.
Should've been a doctor, oh, then they can see what they're getting.

Oh no, don't blame Mexico,
that's the feast that the whisky priest may yet have to forego.
Rob me a colour, make the sound duller, but never go away.

Through teeth of sharks the Autumn barks, and Winter squarely bites me.
Don't ever do this again.
Dawn breaks in the Southern States, and blindfolded he rests,
the burden of loves last request.
That's the feast that the whisky priest may yet have to forego.

Oh no, don't blame Mexico,
they ask for more than you bargained for and then they ask for more.
Oh no, don't blame Mexico,
that's the feast that the whisky priest may yet have to forego.
They ask for more than you bargained for and then they ask for more.
Rob me a colour, make the sound duller, but never go away. "
================
The Quiet American (1958) interesting entry in Wikipedia:

"Set in Saigon during 1952, as the Vietnamese national liberation forces are delivering some major strikes against the French colonial rulers, the film unfolds along the framework of a complex love story and murder mystery[1] with political intrique.

The film departed from Greene's premise at the end of the book, sanitizing Pyle's moral culpability, and portraying the Communists as actually responsible for the terrorist acts that, in the novel, were provocations by anti-Communists. This removed the anti-American sentiment of the book. It is also important to note that the movie refused to allow Fowler to win back Phuong at the end."

I'll check this out. Thanks! I haven't seen "Savage Grace" either, but films generally don't handle incestuous relationships very well. I love how "Chinatown" very subtly reveal this as the major issue with the Faye Dunnaway character. Also, I love "Murmur of the Heart" by Malle (1971). That is an intense and wonderful film. That fillm may be the best one I've seen covering this issue.

I had a self-devised film-art minor in college, and I have to give a particular professor credit for teaching me and others to appreciate the slow pacing, and heady depth within much of the underground European classics. I think one of things that makes the Tarkovsky films like Solaris and the Stalker so mesmorizing is their pace that can completely absorb if you like a great book. Also, it's the beautiful, surreal cinematography that shows you just enough to stimulate your imagination, but doesn't throw things in your face with over the top special effects. It's strange, but I find this approach of letting my imagination do much of the work to be much more unsettling and fascinating. I think that is why when a Director does something like "Memento", "Dead Man" or "LA Confidential" nowadays, it stands apart from the rest of the films, because these films use the same kind of non-narrative story telling that defy one's expectations, and because your brain is being stimulated to look at reality and time in a different manner, the archetypical significance of the characters and the images on the screen resonates in a much more absorbing way. Anyway, it seems to me that watching many foreign or older films ironically is much more stimulating, because the means by which they conveyed reality was so creative, and not just based on "eye candy".

Anyway, I'm glad you share my love or cult cinema. There was several great books by Danny Peary that I owned that listed great cult classics and gave various interpretations for these films. It was via these books that I discovered so many hidden gems like the Jack Nicholson/Warren Oats surreal western "The Shooting" (1968; Roger Corman produced I think), which has recently undergone a major reassessment as being a classic that has influenced many modern directors. Kind of like the Velvet Underground (or Nick Drake) being the band that noone knew about in the late 60's other than people who we're starting new bands in the 70's.

I have many of these films available for downloading on SoulSeek. I am "owljustice".
« Last Edit: September 26, 2009, 02:36:48 PM by Soderking »
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Offline Emma

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #277 on: September 28, 2009, 03:52:09 PM »
Re: The Quiet American - I was more referring to the 2002 one though, King. I thought that was a bit better than the 1958 one but probably it's better if you saw the old version first.

Chinatown is far superior than Savage Grace. It's not that they didn't handle the matter delicately and the movie itself isn't so bad (I thought the director was more focused on the location, costume and the visual effect which were all stunning), but the main character development was poor. I couldn't figure out for the life of me why Babara, the lead character was so perverted. There wasn't much about her past life. It picks up from the time her son was already a few months old. Because of that, the story still remains as a mystery and tragic of course. I did feel sorry for the son who was confused both mentally and sexually and you could see why he did what he did, but in the end, it left me with a bitter feeling. I did not feel sorry for Barbara at all because of the way she was presented and perhaps, that was the point. She was a sociopath and that's that; however, I don't believe that one is born that way so that's why I was very interested in her past but oh well.

I like any movie that's out of the ordinary. I don't need to see something that I see in every day of life. Where's the fun in that? I am always grateful to the directors who make such movies. Hats off to them. My least favourite film is though that has anything to do with drug or drugdealers. That's a huge turn off for me.
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Offline TheEternalCowboy

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #278 on: October 03, 2009, 01:02:04 AM »
Anyone hear of the film "Paranormal Activity"?  It's being billed as one of the most frightening films of all time, and based on what I've been reading from people who have seen it, it may live up to the hype.

http://www.paranormalmovie.com/

Offline Soderking

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Re: Cinema
« Reply #279 on: October 03, 2009, 01:16:28 AM »
Anyone hear of the film "Paranormal Activity"?  It's being billed as one of the most frightening films of all time, and based on what I've been reading from people who have seen it, it may live up to the hype.

http://www.paranormalmovie.com/


It has a 93% Fresh rating at Rotton Tomatoes, which collects all the reviews for a film. This is an EXTREMELY high percentage, higher than many really great films get and the highest for any film that has collected 25+ reviews that is currently out. So that is extremely promising. This is the time of the year for good horror flicks:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/paranormal_activity/#
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